Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 18 June 2009, 14:22   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Isle of Tiree
Boat name: Seaquest
Make: Redbay
Length: 6m +
Engine: Volvo penta
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 70
rib harness

iv been out in my rib in some serious, maybe even stupid conditions lately , great fun doing jumps etc but feel as if i should be strapped to the boat some how . all i have is the foot straps at the min . is there some sort of quick realise harness u can buy out there
__________________

__________________
fraztiree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 June 2009, 17:00   #2
CJL
Member
 
CJL's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Make: Ribcrafts
Length: 5m +
Engine: 150hp/2x115hp
MMSI: 235090215
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 2,115
RIBase
Send a message via Skype™ to CJL
I wouldn't fastening yourself to the RIB. Try improving your toe straps for a more secure feeling first and foremost.

Falling free is probably the best scenario if it all goes Pete Tong.

Yachts float the right way up in most cases and ribs do not. If your fastened to the rib and it remains inverted with you trapped it has the potential to go wrong very fast ..... even with an air pocket.

Chris
__________________

__________________
www.northernexposurerescue.org.uk
A registered charity supporting events across England and Wales
Follow us on Vimeo and Facebook
CJL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 June 2009, 18:01   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
I agree - an auto lifejacket is designed to right you even if your knocked out - how would you get out from under the rib???

I have noticed quite a few of the suspension seats that are being fitted to RIBs now have 5 point harnesses - the same applies!!!
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18 June 2009, 18:29   #4
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
I agree - an auto lifejacket is designed to right you even if your knocked out - how would you get out from under the rib???

I have noticed quite a few of the suspension seats that are being fitted to RIBs now have 5 point harnesses - the same applies!!!
but its about balancing different risks isn't it?

- risk of ejection from the craft
- risk of musculoskeletal injury in rough water
- risk of head/facial injury from hitting console
- risk of capsize
- risk of being trapped under a capsized boat, unconscious

and the likely consequences... in the OP's part of the world if he is singlehanded then ejection from the boat could be very serious (e.g. even with a PLB it will be a long time to rescue).

Even fractures/bleeding following a console collision in that part of the world would be very serious and would probably be much more likely than capsizing - assuming the boat is well balanced and the skipper suitably experienced.

If we can fire lifejackets automatically presumably we can fire self righting bags. Likewise if liferafts can autorelease presumably so could a 5 point harness.

So I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand - although if its making you scared perhaps its time to throttle back? wingbacks on the seat might offer more security too...

Am I right in thinking that raceboats only "strap in" if they have air on board and rescue boats with divers?
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 01:25   #5
Member
 
Leapy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Sheepy Parva
Boat name: Sadly Sold
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
but its about balancing different risks isn't it?
Exactly...seat belts in cars 'tie' you to the crash signature of the vehicle because that is more forgiving and manageable than doing the windscreen taste test. The same would apply to a boat...the use of damped seats - such as the Ullman type or any other seat for that matter - would be augmented by occupants being connected to the damped movement of the seat. That should assist in the further mitigation of spinal or other injuries. But, just as in a car where (say) fire after a roll-over might suggest a quick exit is required - assuming the roll-over is survived or that the occupant is conscious - there are scenarios where ease of egress is essential from a boat too, as was highlighted above.

From a personal experience viewpoint, ejection from the boat or interaction with the console architecture, has been far more likely than the boat itself capsizing.

You pays your money...
__________________
Leapy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 03:51   #6
Member
 
Cookee's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Salcombe, Devon, UK
Boat name: BananaShark
Make: BananaShark
Length: 10m +
Engine: 2xYanmar 260 diesels
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 4,225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
but its about balancing different risks isn't it?

- risk of ejection from the craft
- risk of musculoskeletal injury in rough water
- risk of head/facial injury from hitting console
- risk of capsize
- risk of being trapped under a capsized boat, unconscious

and the likely consequences... in the OP's part of the world if he is singlehanded then ejection from the boat could be very serious (e.g. even with a PLB it will be a long time to rescue).

Even fractures/bleeding following a console collision in that part of the world would be very serious and would probably be much more likely than capsizing - assuming the boat is well balanced and the skipper suitably experienced.

If we can fire lifejackets automatically presumably we can fire self righting bags. Likewise if liferafts can autorelease presumably so could a 5 point harness.

So I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand - although if its making you scared perhaps its time to throttle back? wingbacks on the seat might offer more security too...

Am I right in thinking that raceboats only "strap in" if they have air on board and rescue boats with divers?
Raceboats only have harnesses and air if they have a canopy, and then they are compulsory.

I would suggest IMHO opinion that in the original situation throttling back is the only sensible answer - driving the boat hard enough to be thrown out or hit stuff inside the boat is not really all that sensible. If you are driving a boat hard enough to hurt yourself being strapped in is not the sensible option, I think a bigger boat and or more throttle control are what is needed!

.............. Did I just agree with Codders?
__________________
Cookee
Originally Posted by Zippy
When a boat looks that good who needs tubes!!!
Cookee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 03:59   #7
Member
 
chewy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Up Norf
Make: Avon SR4,Tremlett 23
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yam 55, Volvo 200
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,217
Throttle control seems to be the answer.

I wouldn't want to be strapped or tied to the boat at all. In most cases of capsize the occupants are thrown clear of the boat.

The auto self righting bag sounds like a good idea but if you've gone over once you want the head in the sea which needs a sea anchor.
If you look at the RNLI RIB's they have a sea anchor in the bow with a pull cord on the stern to release it. Once the sea anchor is released you can inflate the righting bad manually and know she'll right with the bow to sea.

On the off chance you did get trapped in the hull you wouldn't want it righting with you under it.
__________________
chewy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 09:11   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
Ocean Dynamics had one of their big jet ribs capsize a few years ago. The boats weigh a few tons and there is a lot of metal work - you most definitely wouldn't want to be under one.

The passengers all sit on the tubes - they were wearing lifejackets and also canoeing/rafting type helmets. A brilliant idea by the late Shaun White.

The conditions were extremly rough to flip one of those boats and yet there wasn't one bad injury.

Being thrown clear is definitely the best way to go. I wonder how many would have made it if they had been trapped inside.

You have to remember that if a boat flips suddenly you will be very disorientated - that coupled with cold water shock and a gasp of air and you are DEAD!!!

And yes Cookee I believe you did - maybe married life is mellowing you somewhat...............
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 09:21   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
zero/zero ejection seats - the only way to go ................
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 June 2009, 09:30   #10
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Ocean Dynamics had one of their big jet ribs capsize a few years ago. The boats weigh a few tons and there is a lot of metal work - you most definitely wouldn't want to be under one.
I don't want to be under any boat thats upside down. I have been under boats that are light enough for me to lift on shore - but in the water that would be impossible - so I'm not sure I understand what the weight of an upturned boat has to do with it.
Quote:
The passengers all sit on the tubes - they were wearing lifejackets and also canoeing/rafting type helmets. A brilliant idea by the late Shaun White.
but it would generally be agreed that ending up with a boat load of passengers in the water is not a brilliant idea!
Quote:
Being thrown clear is definitely the best way to go. I wonder how many would have made it if they had been trapped inside.
I think you are also comparing dissimilar scenarios: inexperienced passenger v's experience crew who can train for escape if required.
Quote:
You have to remember that if a boat flips suddenly you will be very disorientated - that coupled with cold water shock and a gasp of air and you are DEAD!!!
my point was being thrown out of a boat (whether capsized or not) in the wrong part of the world with the sort of weather where that is likely to happen you are quite likely dead anyway - just a slower death. As I think I alluded to in my earlier post - if you are going hard enough to capsize, or to be thrown overboard - you are probably pushing too hard.
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 22:20.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.