Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 15 August 2023, 09:18   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: N. Devon
Boat name: (Not Another) Nutkin
Make: Highfield
Length: 6m +
Engine: Outboard, Honda 135
MMSI: 232036183
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,998
RIBase
Off to find a pasty

We failed to get a pasty last weekend - but did have fun (see below) so hoping to give it a go again this weekend (20/8(

Leaving Plymouth mid morning to find a (hoepfully) Cornish pasty at Fowey - if any one is peckish feel free to shout.


13/8/23
After a couple of weeks away from the water, a small weather window appeared in the forecast so it was off to get the Highfield Patrol 600 wet and some sea miles captured.
Plan A was to drop in at Plymouth, head over to Fowey for the obligatory pasty then run back via the coast. The forecast gave a steady F4 with occasional F6 gusts with a metre wave height – should eb a doddle really.

Arriving at Saltash it looked lovely, limited water movement, some nice blue bits in the sky and a great tide to launch into. As we headed down through Plymouth sound a band could be heard, which seemed strange for a Sunday, until we rounded a bend and could see a frigate returning home, fully decked in flags, with sailors manning the port side, the band we could hear playing and the families waving. Unfortunately, we couldn’t get close enough to take any pictures worth having, but it was great to see.

After clearing the dockyard the first failure of the day was encountered – Jolly Jacks restaurant stops serving breakfast at 11.30!! As it was now 11.45 we were met with blank stares and gutted crew, but a large tea and some superb camembert and calamary soon solved that bit ��

Heading out further into the Sound itself the Patrol finally found some waves to play in. The wind was certainly as per the forecast, and the hull easily pushed through the wind blown chop that was being generated.

Heading out past Fort Pickelcombe the sea state changed again, the protection offered by Rame head disappeared and the wind proved that it may say F4 in the forecast but the amount of white caps and the size of the swell meant we were ploughing into a F5. Trimming the engine in to keep the nose down a touch the Patrol’s hull shape meant we had a lovely dry ride, the double spray rail pushing the water out and away. Cutting through the waves the spacing meant a sensible airtime and landing without too much crashing. That said, there was no way we fancied 18nm of crash, bang and wallop.
Was this failure number 2 of the day or just a sensible approach to sea faring?

We went with option 2 – didn’t need to be there, so wasn’t going to be.

The joys of boating in Plymouth in there is always something to see. Cawsand had some great yachts sheltering from the weather, and half of the UK dive fleet enjoying the silt, sea grass and rocks. HMS Protector was enjoying the warmer UK waters and with lovely looking building being converted at Fort Bovisands.

The other good news is there are plenty of tea and cake option – and one of the best is the boatyard at Weir Quay. Its only a short trip up river, and they sever a superb tea and cake – and it would have been rude not to.

All in all a dry day, (we managed to dodge the showers), 28 nm’s of fun (on 23l of fuel) with some lovely boats and coast line to sit back, enjoy and cruise.

Oh – and if anyone sees a spare wheel in a hedge, it’s mine. I’m pretty sure it was there when I left Saltash but……………………


#DareToExplore
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mine.jpg
Views:	50
Size:	161.0 KB
ID:	143361   Click image for larger version

Name:	red boat.jpg
Views:	45
Size:	13.1 KB
ID:	143362   Click image for larger version

Name:	S3.jpg
Views:	50
Size:	147.8 KB
ID:	143363   Click image for larger version

Name:	s2.jpg
Views:	45
Size:	137.2 KB
ID:	143364   Click image for larger version

Name:	T1.jpg
Views:	49
Size:	95.4 KB
ID:	143365  

__________________
Andy

Bude Dive Club - www.budediveclub.co.uk
GAFIRS - www.gafirs.org.uk
treerat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15 August 2023, 10:15   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: suffolk
Boat name: not yet
Make: Gemini
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 140
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,228
Thanks for the report on your rib outing ,always good to get out and see your regular surroundings and check the best availiable food stops ,would hope to join you in the future for a pasty run maybe one day , in the meantime i will enjoy your tales and photos ,and try not to dream about beachmaster wheels
__________________
Orwell boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 August 2023, 14:52   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: N. Devon
Boat name: (Not Another) Nutkin
Make: Highfield
Length: 6m +
Engine: Outboard, Honda 135
MMSI: 232036183
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,998
RIBase
Sunday the 20th August saw yet another attempt to get a Fowey pasty fail!

Plan A was to leave Saltash and head to Fowey, via the Eddystone lighthouse. My two crew had travelled down from Dorset for the experience, weíd all grown up together canoeing, lifeguarding, rescue boating and diving but so far hadnít met up this end for a day trip. Iíd promised the best views and a pasty but should have known better.

The forecast was pretty good, a f3/4 SW wind and no rain. We left home for the 45 minute journey down to Saltash slipway and boy was that forecast wrong. Rain of biblical portions fell on us, the road ahead was struggling to cope and massive flooded puddles appeared, quick check and nope Ė still no rain forecast! Working on itíll blow over we continued and had a quick and successful launch.

Iím undecided on the current Extreme trailer though. With the Galaxy trailer and the Indespension before it, I only needed to get the lower wheel nuts wet to launch and retrieve. This meant bearings lasted well (4 years on the Galaxy) and breaks even better (6 years at sale). The Extreme seems to need to go lower to get the Patrol on and off. Itís a bigger boat but Iím not expecting the same sort of lifespan Iím used to as the constant submerging of key parts will take its toll so much quicker.

The dock yard is full of big grey ships, yet only two were in the port itself, those visible were in dry dock or mothballed alongside. With little to look at the three of us headed off down river towards the first stop of the day, Mayflower Marina. They have a great cafť on site that is superb for tea, cakes and at this time of the day Ė breakfast. A quick radio request for a short stay and a berth was located, breakfast enjoyed and the nicest of loos tested before we started the journey West, out through the Western entrance and onto the lighthouse. We didnít get far.

Oddly enough I enjoy an airborne Highfield Patrol. With the high rise bow she cuts through well before driving out and over the crest, flying briefly before landing and throwing the spray wide, keeping helm and crews dry. However the thought of 30 odd miles of bouncing, flying and landing didnít fill us with joy. The wind was at the upper end of what was promised but the tail of the previous days storm (Betty)was still throwing up some large swell and with the wind over the tide, we decided an inshore history trail would be more beneficial and less painful, with a combined age on board of 153 itís a sensible consideration!

First up was Fort Picklecombe. It was built near an earlier earthen battery dating back to the start of the 19th century. Constructed between 1864 and 1871, the fort was armed with forty two 9-inch and 10-inch muzzle loading guns, which were mounted in a semi-circular arc of two-storey casemates faced with granite blocks and iron shields. In the 1890s, it was rearmed with two 6-inch breech-loaders and two light quick firing guns. Not a single shot has ever been fired in anger from the fort and its now apartments with their own harbour.
We then flew into Cawsand bay (it really was lumpy) and had a good look at Hawkins Battery. From the sea it looks very much like other coastal forts however itís really just a high angle battery though that was constructed between 1888 and 1892. Initially supplied with four 9-inch Rifled Muzzle Loading (RML) guns on high angle mountings, these guns could provide high angle fire, plunging shells onto the more lightly armoured decks of enemy warships attempting to enter Plymouth Sound.

WW2 saw the location re armed and then sold late 50s, today the location is a holiday camp where the battery remains complete and serves a great cream tea in their cafť!
We moved further into Cawsand Bayand followed the bay past the old Pilchard houses and converted forts (no idea of the name) to see if we could get an Ice Cream (as the sun was now out) but unless we wanted to swim in Ė no joy.

Heading along Rame head there are plenty of historic buildings to look at, wonder what it was used for an understand what its in use for today. First up is Pier Cellars which was once a Brennan Torpedo station, defending Cawsand Bay and the Western access to Plymouth Sound and The Breakwater. A 2nd Brennan was housed at Drakes Island and had a cross fire action with the one based here. The historic fort is covered in earth from above and was an active torpedo test site into the late-1800s. This site is currently used by the Torpoint naval base during initial training.
Brennan torpedoes were designed to be fired from shore onto waterways, as a means to defend against sea-based attacks, and were named after Louis Brennan, the Australian who designed them. Pier Cellar remained an active Brennan torpedo station until 1903 after building work to include a searchlight was completed in 1896, and an iron landing dock in 1898.

The Degaussing Range is next with a building that will make a superb property one day but today shows little interest for the passer by.

Rounding the headland next up was Polhawn Fort, we could find very little information but the finishing touches were made to Polhawn Fort in 1867 (when it was known as Polhawn Battery) and it was built to prevent hostile landings along Whitsand.

With low cloud covering the cliff tops we struggled to see Tregantle fort which is still in use today as a shooting range and where construction commenced in 1859 and was completed in 1865.
When originally designed it had provision for 35 large guns. By 1893 the guns consisted of five RBL 7 inch Armstrong guns and nineteen RML 64-pounders, together with a number of 32 Pounder Smooth Bore Breech Loading (SBBL) guns.

It was also designed with barrack accommodation for 2,000 men in two-tiered casemates at the rear of the Fort. In the event, far smaller garrisons have been based there, with only six gunners in 1882. The fort also had a high angle battery built alongside and the area is still in use today for range shooting by HM forces.
The sea state was still pretty lumpy as we turned and an enjoyable trip towards the Mew stone was enjoyed, as the swell was now behind us. Trimming the nose of the 600 up allowed for a comfy ride with minimal bouncing.
Staying well outside of the shallows we headed up the River Yealm as we could be almost certain of a windless area. The two Dorset boys were soon taking pictures as the anchorage opened up in front of us, the further you head in, the more sheltered and scenic the river becomes. Unfortunately there wasnít enough water to get to the pub at Newton Ferris, so a U turn and back down river was the plan. As we left the estuary the wind and swell had dropped enough to get the cameras out whilst underway Ė and some interesting video footage was taken Ė more practice required me thinks!

We retraced out steps past Wembury and the Mewstone and headed to Fort Bovisand.
In 1816, a stone jetty and slip were built for boats from sailing warships anchored in Plymouth Sound to collect fresh water from the nearby reservoir.
In 1845, the first fort at the site, named Staddon Height Battery, was started. It still exists in the upper part of the present fort.

Work started on the main part of the fort in 1861. Originally intended to have two stories of casemates like Fort Picklecombe, the design was altered during construction to a single storey of 23 granite casemates with armoured shields. The casemates were arranged in an arc and initially housed 22 9-inch Rifled Muzzle Loaders (RMLs) and one 10-inch RML gun, with accommodation for 180 men. Underground there are large deep tunnels to store artillery ammunition safe from enemy gunfire. It was completed in 1869
In 1942, the remaining four 12-pounders were replaced by two twin 6-pounders, to combat E-boats. A three-storey observation tower to direct the fire of these was built at the same time. The following year a Bofors 40 mm anti-aircraft gun was installed.

Today work has started on breathing new life into the area, a major construction project is underway that will bring a new dive centre, visitors centre, marina and luxury housing to the site.

The day wasnít over and following helm time and man overboard drills for those that hadnít used a rib is some 20 years it was time for a pint. The Mountbatten Centre is an ideal location, a quick phone call and a pontoon space was confirmed and as the sun was now properly out a cold pint was enjoyed along with toasted tea cakes of all things.

Leaving the pontoon behind a fast run across the Hoe and back into the Tamar, remembering that thereís a speed limit, before recovering at Saltash.

As the weather was so changeable, we had waterproofs on, off, back on and then off. The rear seat locker on the Highfield was ideal for these when not in use. The space is huge, even with the shower tank in there too, and each of us had a 40l holdall with kit required for the day within along with the standard boat bits of flares, first aid kits, drinking water and so on.

Having a rope locker in the bow and a 2nd storage locker directly behind meant it was really simple for the crew to grab lines, mooring buoys and fenders as required. The storage on board really has been thought about and works well.

The performance, with three large (old) blokes on wasnít really impacted, the picture below shows a great day out, in superb company with an impressive fuel return for a 6m, 135hp package. Although we failed to get our pasty (again) we were able to use Google as we moved from location to location to understand what we were looking at and the history behind it.

It just goes to show that plan B days can be as much fun as plan A, especially when a great rib is involved and lifelong friends.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20230820_111648_HDR.jpg
Views:	30
Size:	168.8 KB
ID:	143415   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20230820_163855_HDR.jpg
Views:	36
Size:	140.7 KB
ID:	143416   Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20230820_113546_HDR.jpg
Views:	30
Size:	285.6 KB
ID:	143417   Click image for larger version

Name:	7.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	167.1 KB
ID:	143418   Click image for larger version

Name:	8.jpg
Views:	25
Size:	161.6 KB
ID:	143419  

__________________
Andy

Bude Dive Club - www.budediveclub.co.uk
GAFIRS - www.gafirs.org.uk
treerat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03 September 2023, 08:14   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Somerset
Make: Takacat
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 243
A great account of all that Plymouth has to offer. I spent my teenage years in Tavistock, so it brings back some good memories. To show my age, I sat on Plymouth Hoe, with thousands of others to watch Francis Chichester return from his round the world voyage!
The whole area is steeped in history, and as you have described, has loads to see.
I havenít been out on the water there since I changed boats- Looking at this I need to rectify that.
Iíve mostly launched from Queen Anneís battery( convenient when coming off the A38 for me).
I fancy coming down for a couple of days. Do you know whether The Mountbatten centreís accommodation is available to public, or only for residential courses? If so , I could launch there.
Thanks for your account, and pictures
__________________
Old seahorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2023, 08:53   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: N. Devon
Boat name: (Not Another) Nutkin
Make: Highfield
Length: 6m +
Engine: Outboard, Honda 135
MMSI: 232036183
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1,998
RIBase
Hello

They do rent out the accomadation, you can also use their pontoon - not sure on the current costs but last time i looked to stay it wasn't much different to one of the local air bnbs.
__________________
Andy

Bude Dive Club - www.budediveclub.co.uk
GAFIRS - www.gafirs.org.uk
treerat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2023, 08:58   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Somerset
Make: Takacat
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 243
Thanks Treerat. Iíve used the slipway before. Iíll contact them about accommodation. Itís a bit of a haul for a day out, so staying over would give me more time on the water.
__________________
Old seahorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT. The time now is 13:55.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.