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Old 02 June 2009, 09:11   #11
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Originally Posted by bedajim View Post
What make of steering is it ?
Admiral Hydrive - just downloaded the instructions and that's the method they give.
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Old 02 June 2009, 12:52   #12
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just downloaded the instructions and that's the method they give.
Do you have the link for them?
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Old 02 June 2009, 13:37   #13
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Lough Lomond
wheres that then ?
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Old 02 June 2009, 13:52   #14
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Found this on the web somewhere: Applies to Seastar steering pumps, but may work for yours as well:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
I have always bleed my steering system using the bleeder valve at the ram on the engine. I would do both upper and lower stations while continuing to fill the port with non-aerated oil... but my steering always seemed to be a little spongy and felt like it had air in it....

Well, a local tech showed me a tip that I had never seen before and I was a bit skeptical until I did it and saw it work... I will attempt to explain this the best I can..

Attach the fill plug fitting, hose and bottle(I use a empty and dry water bottle that has the same threads and cut the bottom off of) to the fill port on the helm. Fill with enough oil to fill the hose and a small amount of
the bottle.. you shouldn't need much.

Turn the wheel all the way to starboard, when the wheel stops, give it about a quarter turn to port and then go back all the way back to starboard(the ram should not move). Do this twice. You will see air bubbles start to shoot up the clear tube and exit the bottle... Now go all the way to port and repeat this... Continue to do each side with 2 to 3 quarter turns until no more air bubles come out the tube.

I'm not sure where these bubbles are coming from. But I could not get them out with the conventional bleeding using the bleed valves. This method builds up pressure in the lines and is forcing the air out of somewhere.

My steering is the smoothest and firmest it has been in 3 years.
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


jky
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Old 02 June 2009, 15:37   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
Found this on the web somewhere: Applies to Seastar steering pumps, but may work for yours as well:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
I have always bleed my steering system using the bleeder valve at the ram on the engine. I would do both upper and lower stations while continuing to fill the port with non-aerated oil... but my steering always seemed to be a little spongy and felt like it had air in it....

Well, a local tech showed me a tip that I had never seen before and I was a bit skeptical until I did it and saw it work... I will attempt to explain this the best I can..

Attach the fill plug fitting, hose and bottle(I use a empty and dry water bottle that has the same threads and cut the bottom off of) to the fill port on the helm. Fill with enough oil to fill the hose and a small amount of
the bottle.. you shouldn't need much.

Turn the wheel all the way to starboard, when the wheel stops, give it about a quarter turn to port and then go back all the way back to starboard(the ram should not move). Do this twice. You will see air bubbles start to shoot up the clear tube and exit the bottle... Now go all the way to port and repeat this... Continue to do each side with 2 to 3 quarter turns until no more air bubles come out the tube.

I'm not sure where these bubbles are coming from. But I could not get them out with the conventional bleeding using the bleed valves. This method builds up pressure in the lines and is forcing the air out of somewhere.

My steering is the smoothest and firmest it has been in 3 years.
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


jky

Have used a similar tip from my Mechanic. Except he suggested attaching a lenght of tubing to the helm port and then to the bottle and suspend at least 3 ft. above helm. Go through procedure you described and then leave over night and repeat. Works great.
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Old 02 June 2009, 17:23   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mbryant View Post
Do you have the link for them?
http://www.hydrive.com.au/site/product-ah.html

The admiral helm is the most common.
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Old 19 July 2009, 09:07   #17
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
I have air in my system - about to bleed it. The steering is very "notchy" and jerky - I assume those are the symptoms with most makes.

The bleeding process needs lots of oil on mine - 2.5 litres. Basically you open a valve on the end of the ram - keep adding oil and spin the wheel pretty fast - it's a 3 man job.
CP, I've just had a similar symptom appear on a SeaStar system - fine steering to starboard, notchy and stiff to port. Did the bleeding and refilling sort you out? Any useful advice on the refilling?
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Old 19 July 2009, 09:14   #18
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Well mine was like that both ways.

Yes it did cure it - basically you get someone to spin the wheel - someone else to open and close the bleeders - and someone to keep topping the oil up - admiral instructions were pretty good.

I bet there is an easier way but as it was my first time thought I would do it properly.
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Old 19 July 2009, 11:00   #19
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I bet there is an easier way but as it was my first time thought I would do it properly.
Thanks - will check it out!
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Old 21 July 2009, 11:30   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
I have air in my system - about to bleed it. The steering is very "notchy" and jerky - I assume those are the symptoms with most makes.

The bleeding process needs lots of oil on mine - 2.5 litres. Basically you open a valve on the end of the ram - keep adding oil and spin the wheel pretty fast - it's a 3 man job.
I just bled my Seastar system. In my case, I had been using Automatic Transmission Fluid, and wanted to get back to regular hydraulic oil. Noticed afterwards that there are a couple of leak points: one at the helm shaft, and one end of the steering ram. Unfortunately, the hydraulic seals were on order at the time, so will have to do the procedure again soon.

I made up an adaptor to sit above the filler hole on the helm, and plumbed that into a plastic pitcher I used to enlarge the reservoir. A piece of tubing off the bleed valve at the ram went into another pitcher to hold the purged oil.

Spun the wheel one way, opened the bleed fitting on the extended ram side, and started turning the other way. After about a pint of fluid bled out, bubbles stopped appearing at the bleed, and I found that by gently slowing the wheel turn, the bubbles would not be sucked back into the ram, which gave me time to close the bleed valve. Repeated the procedure on the other side; went pretty smoothly.

Then, on a tip from someone else (found on some obscure boating forum), with both bleed screws closed, I turned the wheel all the way to one side, then the other way for a half to a full turn of the wheel, and back to the stop. Repeating this several times got a lot of smallish bubbles out of the helm (no idea where the air came from.) Repeated this turning the wheel the other way, and got more air out. All in all, it took about a half hour of working the wheel near-lock at either side to get the bubbles to stop appearing.

Steering was quite smooth and responsive afterwards (though it didn't lighten up as much as I anticipated it would.)

Sometime soon, I'll replace the helm shaft seal and the ram end seals, and hopefully that will take care of the leaks I've got. We'll see...

jky
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