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Old 23 August 2002, 13:01   #1
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Size versus an easy life !

I'm just catching up on some old posts and have just read Matiboy partially regretting his move to 5.8m because of the issues of launching his Rib solo. Having just returned from an enjoyable break on the south coast my mind has returned to the prospect of moving up to a medium sized Rib, but have recognised the practicality issues. At the moment with my Sib I don't need a trailor and have no experience here. We've really enjoyed the freedom of easy launching and I recognise this is going to change with a Rib.

Could people give me views on weights/sizes that can easily be dealt with on launching/ retrieval by one or two people (non Charles Atlas) also other thoughts on Trailor types. I'll be looking (sometime soon hopefully) at possibilities between 4.5m & 5.5m and it would be used for fun family Ribing, no wild, long distance trips (so should I avoid going for a deep V for easy launch?). I'd appreciate your experienced views.
Thanks
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Old 23 August 2002, 17:01   #2
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Hi Chris,
Planning a trip tomorrow to Aran Island -west coast of ireland
I have a 5 m lencraft rib with a yamaha 50 2strk.I can launch and retrieve my boat on my own in most conditions on slipway.I would not worry about shape of hull except get a deep v!
The trailer is the answer to easy launching and rollers and swinging cradle and your ability to get into water if necessary.Hope this helps
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Old 23 August 2002, 18:21   #3
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I keep my SIB on a trailer ('cos of the solid floor) and find that at launch and recovery time, the RIBsters get the job done quicker and easier than me. That's mainly due to their roller-coaster trailers being better than my bunked trailer (need that as the keel/underfloor is soft).

Recently I asked a friend if he wanted a hand recovering his 6.5m Scorpion. I ended up just watching as he singlehandedly completed the whole job without even putting one foot in the water

HTH,

Richard.
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Old 24 August 2002, 11:26   #4
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Thanks for those posts, it sounds as if launching/retrieving say, a 5.5m Rib, isn't as bad as I'd imagined.

I've heard references to "break-back " & "piggy -back" trailors, what is the best type of trailor for a 5 to 5.5m Rib ? Do you keep the trailor attached to a car or release it for the final launch ? I'm still interested in hearing from those of you who have had at one time or another problems with medium size ribs just to understand the circumstances to avoid.
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Old 24 August 2002, 15:48   #5
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Most trailers seem to be very good these days. I don't have a rollercoaster trailer but my 4.7m RIB just slides on. I have no problems launching/recovering my RIB on my own, the main problem is what to do with the RIB while you get the car!

I would certainly get a deep V RIB, they are much more comfortable in rough weather, even if itís just the chop coming out of a harbour. You can also turn tighter corners, good if you are trying to get people off a ringo

It depends on the slip as to whether you can use the car or not.

If the slip has a shallow gradient the car is useless. By the time you have enough water to get the boat off the trailer the car is underwater too.

I prefer steep slips when launching on my own. You can then use the car to launch and recover with out having to unhitch the trailer.

I would recommend avoiding shallow gradient muddy/gravel slips as you can't use the car to pull them out and unless you have 6 very strong people you won't get the boat out the water, unless you resort to winching the trailer out.

Daniel
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Old 25 August 2002, 05:24   #6
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Quote:
I've heard references to "break-back " & "piggy -back" trailors, what is the best type of trailor for a 5 to 5.5m Rib ?
I wouldn't bother with a break back trailer, as they don't seem to offer much real advantage, and the mechanism tends to seize solid anyway.

With this size of RIB you only need a single axle trailer. Go for a trailer with rollers, and you will find it's surprisingly easy to launch and recover.

Given good conditions and a bit of practise you should be able to do it solo (I've launched and retrieved a 7.5m RIB on my own a few times, without getting my feet wet), although you'll find it easier with two of you -- one to back the trailer doen the slip, the other to drive the boat onto the trailer.

If conditions are less than perfect though, my top tip is don't try to stay dry! Bite the bullet and get in the water (a drysuit is a plus here) and manhandle the boat onto the trailer. Trying to tiptoe around, balancing on the trailer is guaranteed to make life difficult. Find a busy slipway tomorrow (bank holidays are always best!) and observe different "techniques" . . .
Quote:
Do you keep the trailor attached to a car or release it for the final launch ?
If the slipway is steep enough, then you will find that there is enough water under the boat before you start to get your car wet. On a shallower slipway it is far better to use a rope between the car and the trailer. It may seem like extra hassle, but it really is worth the extra couple of minutes effort to set up.

John
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Old 25 August 2002, 17:44   #7
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size v easy life

break back trailers are useful. i used one with my previous osprey 5.6. with this you can launch into shallow water solo. I now have a substantial 4 wheel trailer carrying an avon 5.4 with a yamaha 115 and loads of tat in the boat. It is too heavy for me to push off the trailer with my arthritis unless the water is really deep. I attach the painter to an eye midway on the trailer, back into the water and stamp on the brake and off she comes. by this time the water in the nissan patrol is up to my knees but never mind. Another method is to use a solid towbar between truck and trailer. if you have a good front bumper, fix a towball to this and watch your boat, trailer and bumper dissappear into the harbour. There really are loads of ways to do it, like sex really. keep your rollers well greased.
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Old 26 August 2002, 16:07   #8
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Launching worries ?

The 6 metre plancraft rib I can easily launch & recover onto the trailer single handed, this a deep vee rib and is probably also one of the heaviest ribs around for its size.

Simple reason it is so easy to recover is roller coaster trailer with winch. I say it is easy to recover onto trailer, however what's NOT SO EASY, and the bit that gives you a hernia, is when the boat is on the trailer, how do you pull about 300 ton single handed up a shingle slip to try and connect to your car 40 feet away.

This is generally achived by some other helpfull boaters, but if you are on your own then you have to have a long decent rope available to pull the boat clear of the water and then reverse the car up.

With practice can be done quickly. But to summarise the size of rib you are looking at buying can easily be done single handed providing you have a decent trailer.

What I havnt mentioned however is I have since changed ribs again and i am probably now the smallest rib on ribnet @ 3.1 metres, even smaller than Keith !
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Old 27 August 2002, 03:58   #9
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Re: size v easy life

Quote:
Originally posted by davidmanning
I attach the painter to an eye midway on the trailer, back into the water and stamp on the brake and off she comes. by this time the water in the nissan patrol is up to my knees but never mind.
Looks like we can always rely on David for advice on how not to do things!

John
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Old 27 August 2002, 07:24   #10
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To be fair

I've used the 'ol reverse sharply and stamp on the brakes technique myself when short handed. It does work but care is needed not to overdo it! I learned this from Paul Lemmer so maybe on second thoughts it isn't the way to do thingsQ
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