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Old 04 July 2011, 07:34   #1
sib
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Rib driving technique in strong following sea..?

maybe it`s just me but I find it much easier driving the rib into a headwind than with a tailwind and surfing.

has anyone got any tips for driving with a following sea ? I trim up a bit to try and avoid a stuffing, the boat is 5.8m long

any hints much appreciated

thanks
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Old 04 July 2011, 08:25   #2
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zig zag - over the waves if possible, advice if running for cover is to go head on to seas, since it might be more uncomfortable but is safer, and when you reach your destination you almost guarantee entry to safe haven.

If a big wave catches you up behind you there is real danger of the boat capsizing/swamping.
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Old 04 July 2011, 08:54   #3
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It depends!

The frequency of the waves (distance between them) is the critical factor. Obviously lots of trim is the answer, but you need power and lots of it to make it work for you. Depending on the tendencies of your individual boat you will need more or less trim and power combined to keep the nose up and out of trouble, the secret is know your boat (lots of practise in changing conditions) and always put the power on before you hit the bottom of the wave.

In really bad conditions or breaking waves it is best policy to stay on the back of a wave, if possible never allow a breaking wave to get any where near the back of the boat - it will end badly!

Hope that helps a bit,
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Old 04 July 2011, 09:16   #4
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Once it gets so rough that the boat is slamming, or nose diving into the wave in front, adjust your speed to stay just behind the crest(s). When a wave breaks ahead of you, accelerate over the remains so as not to be overtaken by the one behind and to catch up with the next one in front.

As said, practice in moderate conditions as the effect scales up!
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Old 04 July 2011, 09:19   #5
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Hi SPR

thanks.

If the wind is directly behind you and your destination directly in front of you, would you still zig-zag or aim straight and throttle on/off ?

any advice much appreciated..
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Old 04 July 2011, 09:30   #6
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I would zig zag to be honest, each case on it own, better getting there in good shape a bit longer than get there all sore and no fun, and if things get really bad i would run for cover back to where i came for or to closer port...

Big of passage planning, what happens if things get up? alternative safe haven etc .

As the rest said modify speed to suite conditions, practice in "safe" eviroment. I play in the bay in rough conditions to get expereince...one dont need to venture far to get big waves in scotland!

regards

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Old 04 July 2011, 09:37   #7
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Originally Posted by sib View Post
maybe it`s just me but I find it much easier driving the rib into a headwind than with a tailwind and surfing.

has anyone got any tips for driving with a following sea ? I trim up a bit to try and avoid a stuffing, the boat is 5.8m long

any hints much appreciated

thanks
IMHO this is some of the best RIB fun you can get, a force 6 on the tail is fantastic if you know how to use it

Sort your weight in the boat, if it moves tie it down.. set the trim and grab the throttle like its part of your body.. because the wave has a shallow back compared to the front, you drive up the wave ... have confidence .. let the boat come off the top and use the hull to absorb the 'splash' into the back of the next one .... go fast enough to leave the wave .. dont fall off the front of it .. you need to have constant power off it at speed .. sure .. you might stuff it if you havent read things right, thats why the throttle should be part of you and theres lot of floaty bits round you to keep you right.. but when you get it right .. its as good as any fair ground ride Ive ever been on .. I run like this often and have done about 25 NM of this once .. with a light stuff at one point but got off the boat looking for more
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Old 04 July 2011, 10:25   #8
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It's a balance depending on the wave length, wave form and size, and the characteristics of your boat. At the risk of stating the obvious, a rib lifts its bow when power is applied, it also does this when power is removed but these are not equivalent because in the second case you have reduced forward motion. Also, a boat will turn most easily on the crest of a wave because the hull length in the water is shorter. Use these characteristics to your advantage.

Firstly, watch the sea surface and look ahead because it is possible to drive around some of the bigger waves or sets of waves.

If the waves are not so big you can't keep going at a reasonable speed but you start jumping then attempt to apply some power as you land and avoid backing off the throttle at that point. Temper this though because there will always be a big one which is best missed. Trim can be in or out depending on your speed and the wave shape and you may wish to adjust it to suit as you travel over varying water.

If the waves are so big you need to slow considerably but you can still travel faster than the waves then you have to work hard and watch the sea carefully, generally you will apply up trim (but this is not a hard and fast rule) to hold the bow a wee bit high. Power up the back of the wave and just over the crest, pull back a tad on the throttle as you pass over the crest until you are just about down the wave front and fitted into the trough then apply plenty of power to lift the bow up and onto the back of the next wave.
Avoid applying power too late.

If the seas are big enough that driving over the waves is just not worth the effort or maybe not possible then travelling at approximately the wave speed is much more relaxing. To do this power onto the back of the wave in front and kinda hover there while the wave rises then folds or subsides then make your way forward onto the back of the next wave. Don't linger, the wave which just subsided will rise again behind you in a short while. It may take considerable power to stay on the back of a steep wave.

All this is only a guide though since each wave and each sea will be different and practise is what you need.
Making way in a following sea can be exhilarating and much more pleasant than pounding into steep head seas. The odd fright will keep you alert but try not to put yourself into a situation where you are constantly frightened and not enjoying your boating.
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Old 04 July 2011, 11:21   #9
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zig zag - over the waves if possible, advice if running for cover is to go head on to seas, since it might be more uncomfortable but is safer, and when you reach your destination you almost guarantee entry to safe haven.

If a big wave catches you up behind you there is real danger of the boat capsizing/swamping.

But beware the combination of big head seas and strong head winds !
This to me is more disconcerting than big following seas alone !
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Old 04 July 2011, 11:54   #10
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thanks everyone, sound advice

i`m visualising it and even pretending to throttle on/off which has coused much amusement in my office..
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