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Old 28 September 2016, 11:21   #11
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Re radar. Indeed, old tech radar could fry your head, assuming you were close enough, in the transmission plane, had it running continuously. Modern 3&4 G broadband radar is relatively safe.
You must have seen the installs that have the ray-dome mounted at eye-level less than a meter from standing crew. It might be "relatively" safe but it contravenes the manufacturers instructions and it contravenes common sense.
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Old 28 September 2016, 14:06   #12
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Odd that you recommend a satellite messenger over a PLB. If you have VHF, mobile phone then you have "run of the mill" comms covered. A PLB is indeed a "sh1t or bust" device, but surely that's what you need? If it's all going pear shaped I want to send for the cavalry, not start texting a third party & relying on them to send help.

Re radar. Indeed, old tech radar could fry your head, assuming you were close enough, in the transmission plane, had it running continuously. Modern 3&4 G broadband radar is relatively safe.


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Pikey,

Sorry, I left out a sentence I meant to include that when your out of general comms range; beyond vhf & cell services. We use to use a sat phone for those times but a cheaper, smaller and somewhat better method now is the Satellite Messenger Device (SMD). There's nothing wrong with PLB's but it cannot send an “Okay” message, and it cannot receive messages; it also does not confirm receipt of the emergency signal.

I will say a SMD is excellent with the addition to having a PLB (5 watt).

SMD can be used just like a PLB although not through COSPAS-SARSAT instead through 112 in Europe, it's just gives you more options with more levels of communication, (and receiving) and sending out tracking positions and more detailed info without blindly calling for the calvary when not really needed but there is a relatively small fee for that you can pay just for one month or a yearly subscription. Paying for that one month on the big adventures makes sense, just have to remember to pay it prior to untying the docklines.


In regards to Radar, how many ribs have a tower directly above passengers & helm to mount a radar? While true that todays radars are much better than their older sisters (can be said for most things) most A frames are at head height and aft putting passengers & helm area directly and squarely in the forward looking 20 degree peak power zone that is something that every manufacturer strongly does not recommend.

If there is already a tower above the helm, then that would be good for radar.

I will lastly say sadly it surprises me how many ribs go out on the ocean without fresh flares or even a first aid kit.
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Old 28 September 2016, 14:28   #13
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I would say the majority of things that are going to spoil your day in a RIB involve floating debris, fishing buoys and other small vessels that don't appear on radar, AIS or other devices.

Does having loads of technology on board help or hinder your safety in the environment RIB's tend to operate in?

It's no criticism of anyone, just an alternative view.
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Old 28 September 2016, 14:47   #14
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Pikey,

Sorry, I left out a sentence I meant to include that when your out of general comms range; beyond vhf & cell services. We use to use a sat phone for those times but a cheaper, smaller and somewhat better method now is the Satellite Messenger Device (SMD). There's nothing wrong with PLB's but it cannot send an “Okay” message, and it cannot receive messages; it also does not confirm receipt of the emergency signal.

I will say a SMD is excellent with the addition to having a PLB (5 watt).

SMD can be used just like a PLB although not through COSPAS-SARSAT instead through 112 in Europe, it's just gives you more options with more levels of communication, (and receiving) and sending out tracking positions and more detailed info without blindly calling for the calvary when not really needed but there is a relatively small fee for that you can pay just for one month or a yearly subscription. Paying for that one month on the big adventures makes sense, just have to remember to pay it prior to untying the docklines.


In regards to Radar, how many ribs have a tower directly above passengers & helm to mount a radar? While true that todays radars are much better than their older sisters (can be said for most things) most A frames are at head height and aft putting passengers & helm area directly and squarely in the forward looking 20 degree peak power zone that is something that every manufacturer strongly does not recommend.

If there is already a tower above the helm, then that would be good for radar.

I will lastly say sadly it surprises me how many ribs go out on the ocean without fresh flares or even a first aid kit.

You forgot the inverse square rule😏


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Old 28 September 2016, 15:16   #15
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I would say the majority of things that are going to spoil your day in a RIB involve floating debris, fishing buoys and other small vessels that don't appear on radar, AIS or other devices.

Does having loads of technology on board help or hinder your safety in the environment RIB's tend to operate in?

It's no criticism of anyone, just an alternative view.
Zero argument there. 99.5% of days being badly spoiled are by exactly what you described.
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Old 28 September 2016, 15:32   #16
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Maybe worth mentioning to the detractors of AIS that many "points of local interest" such as navigation buoys, lighthouses and Coast Guard stations are now equipped with AIS transponders...

An extra layer in our defences against the Big Sleep
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Old 29 September 2016, 06:09   #17
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Thanks to everyone for your replies. I'm pleased that I've already got a Chartplotter (iPhone, iPad with Navionics app), 2 x DSC VHF's, Echomax , PLB, flares etc. so pretty well covered.

AIS could be useful, from a pure interest point of view but also so others can see you and where you've been ( hopefully not the wife&#128514 As regards Radar I've been looking at the Lowrance 3G/4G broadband which according to Lowrance is very safe from an emissions perspective and actually 5 times better than a mobile phone. Saying that I agree it is more nice to have opposed to need, but using the boat for night passages and have travelled from Penzance to Scilly in thick fog across the Lands End TSS , both AIS and radar could be useful!

I suppose the other safety device beyond all the electronic aids is always to wear life jackets and use the kill cord! The lifeboat (and helicopter) on Scilly was out twice this summer to rescue people who had been thrown out of their boats not wearing life jackets and using their kill cords- one family are extremely luck to be alive!
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Old 29 September 2016, 06:33   #18
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Having had both radar & AIS, if I had to, I would choose AIS over radar. Radar is only as good as the operator & needs to be higher than can usually be achieved in a RIB to be effective. A custom tower or A frame is really needed to make it worthwhile.
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Old 29 September 2016, 08:41   #19
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I'm the opposite to PD. I have both radar and AIS but would choose radar every time. I don't find operating the radar at all difficult and it is the only device which actually shows you what is out there. If a boat does not have an AIS tranmitter or it is off or transmitting incorrect info (which they do) you won't know. If in fog, you need to know what is around you so you know what you may crash into rather than only considering avoiding what might crash into you. Also, I've been in situations in a fog where the chart is wrong or where a buoy is off station - the radar lets you look carfully at your surroundings to determine where you actually are. In good visability I often see boats on the radar long before I spot them by eye. Even small targets can be seen, birds, creel pot markers, logs etc. and at night spotting a creel buoy is defo worth knowing about.
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Old 29 September 2016, 09:21   #20
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I'm the opposite to PD. I have both radar and AIS but would choose radar every time. I don't find operating the radar at all difficult and it is the only device which actually shows you what is out there. If a boat does not have an AIS tranmitter or it is off or transmitting incorrect info (which they do) you won't know. If in fog, you need to know what is around you so you know what you may crash into rather than only considering avoiding what might crash into you. Also, I've been in situations in a fog where the chart is wrong or where a buoy is off station - the radar lets you look carfully at your surroundings to determine where you actually are. In good visability I often see boats on the radar long before I spot them by eye. Even small targets can be seen, birds, creel pot markers, logs etc. and at night spotting a creel buoy is defo worth knowing about.

I think these are very much the reasons Why I have been. Onside ring radar - at night and in fog. I have had one situation where I came across an uncharted ledge at night which may have been different had I been using radar. Do you have yours mounted like PD? Or just on the A frame?
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