Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 23 June 2003, 12:33   #11
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Newfoundland
Length: no boat
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 2,097
Quote:
Originally posted by Manos
This reply doesn't help, does it??
Errm, NO!
__________________

__________________
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 12:38   #12
Member
 
Country: Greece
Town: Gloucetsreshire
Boat name: GATO DI MARE
Make: MAR.CO
Length: 9m +
Engine: Yamaha 200Vmax
MMSI: 235027678
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,339
Send a message via MSN to Manos Send a message via Yahoo to Manos Send a message via Skype™ to Manos
Right then
Have to get the books out
__________________

Manos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 13:03   #13
Member
 
Country: Other
Make: FB 55
Length: 10m +
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 1,711
Quote:
Originally posted by Alan
Errm, NO!
Agreed.
I am really quite keen to have 'expert witnesses' as this decision (hard or soft schnoz) surely is important enough to assist in considering what to go for if you are in the market for a new rib - probably on the larger side -ok, Alan W?
__________________
Charles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 13:07   #14
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Bristol
Make: none
Length: no boat
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 283
Further to my earlier post.

It was Tony Lee-Elliott writing in Rib International Mag June 2003 issue.

When writing about the Nose of RIBS

A part of the article is about how the forces encountered in a stuff can in a good design be used to keep the tubes on the hull.

quote

' when the nose of a RIB is rammed deep into the back of a wave in what is called a folowing sea, the force of the action tries to lift the nose of the collar and sepearte from the still plunging hull. This is called a STUFF and the force of the whole action can be reversed and put to good use and so pulling the bows down onto the hull by simply applying two strops of strong two inch webbing. The first runs from mooring line bow eye up and backwards over the nose, down to floor inside the bows to be tensioned to a U bolt set in the floor. The second strop runs at right angles through the bow eyelet, up and around each side, over the top of the collar to join each end with the first strop on the same floor mounted U bolt'
__________________
Regards

Martin
mstacey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 14:42   #15
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Hamble
Length: 9m +
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 2,317
Quote:
Originally posted by mstacey

'and so pulling the bows down onto the hull by simply applying two strops of strong twwo inch webbibg. The first runs from mooring bline bow eye up and backwards over the nose, down to floor inside the bows to be tensioned to a U bolt set in the floor. The secondstrop runs at right angles through the bow eyelet, up and around each side, over the top of the collar to join each end with the first strop on the same floor mounted U bolt'
As Mike Ring does with his ribs!
__________________
Dirk Diggler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 14:43   #16
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Milford Haven
Boat name: Various
Make: Commercial
Length: 10m +
Engine: Screw / Voith / Jets
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 791
Send a message via MSN to Alex Brown
Re: Re: The case against.......

Quote:
Originally posted by Charles
I do realise that many people have ribs simply because they are crap at berthing etc and use the tubes as a great big fender. This surely is not a reason to have a soft nose.
Not so much on the safety side, but when my *new* (damnit) engine was having random stalling sessions (mostly when berthing), I had a couple of head ons with walls whilst dropping or picking people up. Only at very very low speed, but a hard nose would have probably cracked, whilst the tubed bow just bounced off and all was well - ie, no damage to anything on the front of the boat.

I have only managed to nearly stuff my boat twice into the water - the first time was an accident on a misjudged wave (not taking power off quick enough), and the 2nd time cos there were 4 adults at the bow of the boat, and I guess it was inevitable - we slowed down pretty quick when doing this . In both cases, we didn't get water in the boat, but it was about a few centimetres from coming over and in.... it looked pretty spectacular as the water went in both directions to the side of the boat mind Also, in both cases, the tube was inflated to the right pressure, and didn't even show a hint of folding back. From some other comments, it must also come down to the construction of the boat..... the Humber seems quite strong up front, and there is what seems to be a fair bit of extra fabric around the bow to re-enforce this.

-Alex
__________________
Flickr Photos
Youtube Videos
Alex Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 16:06   #17
Trade member
 
Andre's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West Sussex
Boat name: Grey Mist
Make: Parker 800 Baltic
Length: 8m +
Engine: 2xMercury Diesel 170
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 3,457
RIBase
Send a message via Skype™ to Andre
Quote:
Originally posted by Alan Priddy
And for those "Old hands" Does anyone remember Mikes Deacons first hard nose rib in Scotland? That came off as well!
Alan P

Alan
Was that during "Round Scotland 1998" cos I was there and do recall a rib stuffing a wave and the tube coming off. The next wave shatted the console and most of the instruments popped out

Not something I would want to experience

Andre
Andre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 17:14   #18
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Blackpool
Boat name: To Exi
Make: new sib 4 man
Length: 8+ft
Engine: Mariner 4hp long shaft
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 1,012
Look No Tubes? Whatwe we gona doo ?

Well for what its worth,my opinion on the subject is its all down to how the boat is designed and its used?,and how the tubes are fixed on to the tube carrier and there expected loads / impact.

As some are aware we decided for tubes as apposed to a hard nose.
I questioned should we fit a 2ft wide bow metal bridle that could be bolted top and bottom,so as to give full enclosure of the bow tube,just in case?.

But I was quite rightly told,they had no problems with fixings and if needed they use them with a detachable rubber bridal for tug work,pushing logs down the rivers ect.

I had heard some tales of stress cracks appering on some hard nose boats,being driven at speed in bad conditions.I also heard of tubes comming off in moderate seas on some boats.

After a quick look into this I felt that the common denominater was a tube glued on to a flimsy fixing point ,or not fixed properly to the hull or abused.As if fixed with glue onto a descent carrier it should be ok as most still work fine and some commercial avons 20yrs on.

Avon,and Zodiac and Delta havent had these problems as far as I am aware, as if they had then maybe as they want to keep there commercial markets they would of changed it,or it would start to cost them real money ?so it must be IMHO design of fixing .

As a builder can change his design if needed to a hard nose and some havnt?,some have.

So my take on the subject is,Its down to what sort of tube carrier you have and its fixing points to the hull and if designd correctly to take the loads then tubes are no problem .Ours can come off and the sea is faced with a metal watertight bow, with the advantages of cushining and flex and front end boyancie you get with a tube.

As far as a hard nose is concerned then it doesnt have the same boyancie area as a tube or flex when inverted,but does give you a big bow locker and will cut through a sea dependant on its design.

I am not saying that a hard nose is crap as it gives more room in the bow and slices but can crack if wacked hard.

They are using tubes with no problems commercialy in Canada as they are here, and they push twin 250s all day long at crazy speeds.

Last wk I spoke to a commercial opperater who was in my oppinion being straight with me, he said that his normal tubed bow alli ribs had done 80,000 offshore miles with no problems and the boats are out every day and he owns three of them.

The tubes are machanicly fixed into a half moon shapes cradle at 6oclock all the way round to 12 oclock with bolted strips running there full length top and bottom and can be detached if required by unbolting.

I think of you sell hard nose ribs then you will say its very important to have one ?, if you dont then you have to decide and look into the fixing arangments/attachment method of tubes to the boat .

After that look at the boats that the tube came off or detached and then take a rational view as to the reason this happend?

There could be several reasons for it.

Its not IMHO as simple as one is better than another.




__________________
www.eurocommuter.com
crazyhorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 18:01   #19
Member
 
Country: Greece
Town: Gloucetsreshire
Boat name: GATO DI MARE
Make: MAR.CO
Length: 9m +
Engine: Yamaha 200Vmax
MMSI: 235027678
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 3,339
Send a message via MSN to Manos Send a message via Yahoo to Manos Send a message via Skype™ to Manos
Thought that Canada will feature somehow CH
Still reading RIB Int'l June edition about what is the best RIB to get and still 'understand noooothing'. Will keep loooooking
Manos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2003, 18:06   #20
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Blackpool
Boat name: To Exi
Make: new sib 4 man
Length: 8+ft
Engine: Mariner 4hp long shaft
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 1,012
Manos the best rib to get is the one that makes you happy.
__________________

__________________
www.eurocommuter.com
crazyhorse is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 15:50.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.