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Old 27 July 2010, 15:01   #1
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Country: UK - England
Town: Blakeney
Boat name: Lindy
Make: Avon
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu 9.8
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Avon Repairs

I want to reglue a few overlaps on my Avon Rover SIB. I'm not sure whether to use the 1 part glue or if to go for the 2 part.
Also, I'll need to keep the overlaps apart while the glue loses its tack. I shouldn't touch them with my fingers, so I wonder if anyone has an idea how I might keep them separate for the time needed?
The overlaps are mostly on the factory fitted patches for ropes, etc. They have peeled at the edges. Also the flap from tubes to floor needs a bit of glue.
Any advice would be very much appreciated!
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Old 27 July 2010, 19:32   #2
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Country: USA
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Make: zodiac futura mk2
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The one part glue is for emergency repairs. I would only use it for temporary repairs. Use the two part correctly and you will get a very strong bond. here is a link to proper PVC gluing techniques. Hypalon instructions are also on this website, see the links at the bottom of the page.
http://www.shipstore.com/SS/HTML/INFO/INFOGLUE.html

Often you can just pull the edges back with the accessory, use a thin piece of wood to prop up a bigger flap or if necessary use a thread and needle. I have used thread through the material on non tube repairs to keep the edge open and the small hole just seals up when the material is bonded.

You should always pull on seams around an unbonded area to see if the open section will get bigger. You will often find the surrounding bond is ready to fail. It is disheartening to extend an open seam, but better now than later!

The floor to tube bond is very important. Be sure to clean and properly prep the surfaces to be bonded. New glue does not stick to old glue. I repaired my floor to tube seam with the tubes inflated. This seam takes a lot of abuse. Be sure the humidity and temp are within the acceptable range. You want as strong of a bond as you can get!

Using the thread technique:
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Old 28 July 2010, 02:06   #3
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Country: UK - England
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Avon repair

Thank you very much for the advice and for taking time to reply: I'm confident enough to have ago now.
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Old 28 July 2010, 12:33   #4
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Be sure to post some pictures of your repair! I learn something new every time I see a repair being made or discuss techniques with others.
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Old 28 July 2010, 12:42   #5
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Since you are working on the floor to tube seam I thought I should add a comment. The glue in the narrow crevice on the sides of a floor seam repair will often not go off as fast as the rest of the exposed glue. I usually let it go a little longer and reactivate the open surfaces with a solvent wipe. Still, in those little crevices the glue may not be tacky enough to have a good initial bond. If you just let the glue cure you can end up with a leak or seep where the old glued seam and new repair come together. To avoid this, when I glue repairs like this I add pressure to hold the still wet glued surfaces together until the glue has cured. I use Polymarine and Sta Bond on PVC mostly. The glue will cure and the seams do hold. Here is a picture of the painters extension I use to apply pressure to these critical spots and ensure a good cured bond at the edge of the repair. In the example the extension is applying pressure to the section of my repaired speed tube cover where the seam was too tight to allow the glue to set up fully. A little pressure at the edges of the repair can be a good thing. Large flaps, patches and accesories don't usually have this sort of restricted space. Good luck!
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