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Old 31 December 2014, 16:49   #1
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2 or 4 wheel

hey folks,

as some may know, i have a new boat sorted and i still can't decide on the trailer.

couple of things that bother me to varying degrees and looking for some expert opinion based on your own experience.

ideally i want to put the ribcraft 6.8 on a single axle trailer for a few reasons, but namely-

1. my dads current car will be legal to tow it and staying under 2000kg will be important for my own needs in the future. i have an xtrail just now but i do 60 miles per day so a big car to tow is not an option. 1800-1900kg single axle means more choices in cars for work duty and towing.

2. if i buy 4 wheel trailer my storage fees instantly double, i need to keep the boat where it is now, i like the place. but is it worth paying double for?

3. i would buy the tyron bands on a single axle to protect against blowouts or punctures.

4. if i buy a single axle it will be damn close to the max permissible weight (the boat will be weighed on forklift before i buy anything so i know exactly my overhead. but it will probably be circa 1350kg with fuel on it and normal bits'bobs based on what i can find. i am concerned about the life expectancy on a trailer so close to the limit...i.e bending???

so....the question really is, what should i do.

thanks gents for the help...appreciated.

cheers
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Old 31 December 2014, 16:55   #2
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My advice based on personal experience: Man up and buy the twin axle
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Old 31 December 2014, 17:27   #3
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Seems to me it is ease of maneuvering and lower cost versus redundancy and high cost (both purchase and maintenance). Do you intend to tow long distance regularly? Do you need to manoeuvre in tight spaces?
My single axle under a 'big' heavy build 6.5m has been fine, no 'bending' or reliability issues.
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Old 31 December 2014, 17:53   #4
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Hi Ian,

In reality i probably won't tow more than a few hundred miles per year. my "normal" towing distance is circa 10 miles to the river clyde or 20 miles to loch lomond.

but i would like to take the boat further afield if the notion takes me.

where the boat is kept can get tight for space yes (hence the double price charging). what i normally need to do is phone and they get the boat ready for me to take away.

cheers
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Old 31 December 2014, 18:00   #5
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As we mentioned last week twin axle all the way for me
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Old 31 December 2014, 18:35   #6
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Hi Ian,

In reality i probably won't tow more than a few hundred miles per year. my "normal" towing distance is circa 10 miles to the river clyde or 20 miles to loch lomond.

but i would like to take the boat further afield if the notion takes me.

where the boat is kept can get tight for space yes (hence the double price charging). what i normally need to do is phone and they get the boat ready for me to take away.

cheers
So, you are not normally towing far, occasionally further, and you need to manoeuvre in tight spaces. Sounds just like my normal use. Single axle and carry spares if towing further. Never needed the spares with proper maintenance.
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Old 31 December 2014, 20:29   #7
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Weighing the RIB fully laden will ultimately tell you what route you're going to have to take. If you go for one of the renowned trailer makers using the maximum load weight of the trailer shouldn't be a problem. I know that if you asked Arthur at degraff for instance to beef everything up, he would.
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Old 01 January 2015, 04:55   #8
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I would personally go for a 2000kg twin axle for various reasons:

1. It will be more stable to tow than a single axle.
2. You have redundancy in case of a blow out, bearing failure, etc.
3. I expect you will be pushing the weight limit for a single axle by the time you add the weight of the boat, engine, fuel, accessories, etc. While this shouldn't cause any problems for a properly built trailer, you risk being overloaded if you are ever stopped or worst still involved in a accident which could then have insurance implications.
4. There are plenty of diesel hatchback/estate cars on the market which will happily pull 2000kg and still give good economy for your normal driving.
5. For manoeuvring by hand in a tight space, the jockey wheel can be would up high lifting the front axle off the ground and effectively making the trailer as manoeuvrable as a single axle.

We could offer:
South Coast Boat Trailers - R4/2000EL Twin Axle Multi Roller Boat Trailer
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Old 01 January 2015, 09:50   #9
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we've towed our Revenger 715 (7m+) on a SBS 1800 EL single axle trailer for approx 7 years with no real issues, certainly no punctures or blowouts, we went for a single axle for the same reason you have mentioned, storage at home was a bit tight for manoeuvring with a twin axle, I've looked at replacing it with a twin axle but have decided to refurbish the original trailer
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Old 01 January 2015, 11:21   #10
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Originally Posted by SW Boat Transport View Post
I would personally go for a 2000kg twin axle for various reasons:

1. It will be more stable to tow than a single axle.
2. You have redundancy in case of a blow out, bearing failure, etc.
3. I expect you will be pushing the weight limit for a single axle by the time you add the weight of the boat, engine, fuel, accessories, etc. While this shouldn't cause any problems for a properly built trailer, you risk being overloaded if you are ever stopped or worst still involved in a accident which could then have insurance implications.
4. There are plenty of diesel hatchback/estate cars on the market which will happily pull 2000kg and still give good economy for your normal driving.
5. For manoeuvring by hand in a tight space, the jockey wheel can be wound up high lifting the front axle off the ground and effectively making the trailer as manoeuvrable as a single axle.
I've done a lot of towing over the years, boats & caravans, single & twin axle & prefer twin axle every time for the reasons given above^^
Point 5 is especially worth taking on board if you have a twin axle!
I've had a tyre go on a twin axle caravan - delivering brand new - on the motorway & only realised when people passing me were pointing downwards. No effect on the stability whatsoever.
If you can't get the front axle off the ground - more of a caravan thing due to their layout & not now so much of an issue as many have motor movers - then you will need to move it around by using the towing vehicle as you will be trying to get one wheel on each axle to slide sideways. That said, if you're on hard standing - concrete or tarmac - a tray under one wheel on each axle helps them to slide.
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