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Old 12 February 2008, 17:38   #11
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I would agree with that Matt , and you described it better than i could have done .
I think the modern engines with coated bores need mainly the rings to bed in properly so they don't use oil .
even VW give you oil with a new van and tell you expect some considerable usage untill its run in .
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Old 12 February 2008, 18:05   #12
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Actually, I was gonna make a comment about tolerances in a modern engine & running in. Because the other thing I've read is that modern auto motors are manufactured to sufficient tolerances, and in particular, plateau honing of the bores, that they should need virtually no running in.

Have also heard the suggestion that you should just thrash a motor from the outset to get the cylinder pressures up and force the rings to bed in properly.

But don't take my word for it. Again, I aint brave, especially if I've put it together myself.

I've researched oils (and appopriate use of) to death and just end up going in circles depending on what product they';re trying to sell you.
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Old 12 February 2008, 21:03   #13
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Originally Posted by Matt View Post
Actually, I was gonna make a comment about tolerances in a modern engine & running in. Because the other thing I've read is that modern auto motors are manufactured to sufficient tolerances, and in particular, plateau honing of the bores, that they should need virtually no running in.

Have also heard the suggestion that you should just thrash a motor from the outset to get the cylinder pressures up and force the rings to bed in properly.

But don't take my word for it. Again, I aint brave, especially if I've put it together myself.

Not quite a straight thrash, but there is a specific procedure/sequence of loading you can use IF your nicely rebuilt engine is machined to the correct tolerances.

I'm not going to post what it is though as I'm guaranteed someone will try it on an engine and blow it up...
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Old 13 February 2008, 02:20   #14
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Originally Posted by Matt View Post
The claim is that on high quality synthetics the film strength is so high that the bores & rings don't wear enough to bed the rings in. So by using a mineral oil for the running in period, enough wear occurs to bed the rings in properly, at which point you can switch to a synthetic.
Stands good for BMW boxer engines... None of mine, so far, were really run in til around 15/20K.. at which point they stop using oil and it's time to switch to semi synths...
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