Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 20 June 2016, 10:38   #11
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by office888 View Post
Even if we assumed Seadog built to a 2:1 safety ratio (which is on the low side, most manufacturers chase a 3:1 or 5:1), that would put even the light duty hinges at 600 lb capacity. Then, we'll assume the load is divided evenly amongst both hinges, so we'll times this by two. Meaning, the hinges would have had to seen in excess of 1200 lb of loading to fail.

If you have 2 or 3 no-so-smallish people on the seat and the boat leaves the surface and slams back down, I could see 1200 lbs being reached pretty easily.

Your math seems very reasonable and believable, though I'm not sure the failure criteria is all that straightforward in realistic terms. It's also going to see some degree of side loading, repeated stress, etc.

But yeah, bottom line is that the supports are pretty underbuilt for serious ocean use...

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 June 2016, 11:06   #12
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 7,590
RIBase
Golden rules of RIBs
If it can fail, it will fail
If it looks sh1t, it is sh1t.

That seat was never going to last.


Sh1t happens
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4: See rule#5
Pikey Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 June 2016, 13:01   #13
RIBnet supporter
 
mick's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Wakefield
Boat name: Bouncer
Make: Redbay Stormforce
Length: 6m +
Engine: 2x Honda 90Hp
MMSI: 235025718
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by office888 View Post
I know that part. Looks like you have the 300 lb limit version.

Here's the 500 lb limit version:
https://www.amazon.com/Sea-Dog-Line-.../dp/B002IV8J66

Wife's ironing board has better brackets on than that 🙄🙄
__________________
mick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 June 2016, 13:26   #14
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: S. Carolina
Boat name: D560
Make: Avon
Length: 5m +
Engine: 2016 Merc 115hp CT
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,120
Quote:
Originally Posted by mick View Post
Wife's ironing board has better brackets on than that 🙄🙄
It's pretty much the standard setup stateside, to run brackets like that for a transom seat.

__________________
Richard
Gluing geek since 2007
office888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20 June 2016, 13:36   #15
RIBnet supporter
 
jambo's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Girvan & Tayvallich
Boat name: Breawatch
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Mercury 150 F/stroke
MMSI: ex directory!!
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 5,787
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by office888 View Post
It's pretty much the standard setup stateside, to run brackets like that for a transom seat.

Certainly would not feel safe on that in calm conditions never mind a slight swell. Not fit for purpose!!
__________________
jambo
'Carpe Diem'
Member of the ebay Blue RIB cover club
Member of SABS ( Scottish West Division)
jambo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 20 June 2016, 14:10   #16
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Glousta
Length: 7m +
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 3
The Sea Dog brackets are not the same as the ones used by Zodiac. The diagonal braces on the SD brackets are stamped to give them rigidity while those used by Zodiac are flat. This again comes to my point that I feel Zodiac uses the cheapest parts they can to put their boats together. Cheap stainless, not bedded ,corrodes..... Good stainless, properly bedded, resists corrosion. That is the standard for a good salt water boat. A Bayliner with tubes.

I agree that the boat does have a badge claiming it is ABYC compliant. I know a lot about ABYC standards and have worked to meet them. Zodiac boats are not compliant. The simplest example is the exposed positive terminal on the battery. The Deustch connectors should be good but they are in a wet location and corrode. My Lights stopped working after a month and I had to clean a grease the connectors. There is also an extra set of these connectors wired in because the harness is not long enough as it isn't made for the TTop.
__________________
tdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 June 2016, 15:09   #17
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdog View Post
The simplest example is the exposed positive terminal on the battery.
I know that's a ABYC requirement, and is also suggested by the USCG 9or USCG Aux - don't remember which now), but my personal view is that it's not as big an issue as in, say, a car, due to the non-grounded hull. In a car, any piece of metal hitting the cathode and any exposed metal will cause a short. In most small boats, you have to hit the anode and cathode (or any connected point) with the offending metal. Much less likely.

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 18:23.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.