Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 20 February 2011, 21:11   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset
Boat name: Seabadger
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140
MMSI: -
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 504
Outboard voltage output regulator

I have an early 90s Mariner 40, 2stroke outboard, serial number 6EM...

The voltage output varies from 8volts at low revs to 16+ volts flat out.

Ive been reading lots of posts on here regarding similiar stories.

Ive re-wired my boat so that the feed from the engine goes to a large 75amp 12volt car battery then an isolator switch, then a fuse box, then feeds off to the instruments.

I still not that the voltage reading on my Lowrance equipment varies significantly at different engine speeds and Im sure this cant be good for the fish finder / gps etc..

Would a standard voltage regulator such as this on on Ebay Item no. 310281692683

Fitted in line with the positive lead from the engine, stabilise the voltage to more consistent 12 ish volts, or do I need something else?

Thanks
__________________

__________________
diver 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 02:52   #2
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Don't think a 12V regulator would work, as it won't have enough input to give you an output when the motor's not running.

Lowrance stuff is supposed to work from 10 to 17VDC, so as long as you stay within that range, your Lowrance unit should be happy (if it doesn't, I think the unit simply shuts down.)

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 05:02   #3
DJS
Member
 
Country: UK - N Ireland
Boat name: *
Make: replacement soon!
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 143
[QUOTE=diver 1;389686]
Would a standard voltage regulator such as this on on Ebay Item no. 310281692683

Fitted in line with the positive lead from the engine, stabilise the voltage to more consistent 12 ish volts, or do I need something else.

Hi There

Voltage in this range (16V) may be a little high and I would check this independently with a multi-meter as normal voltage is between 13.5 and 14.5/15V. If the voltage is too high it will eventually damage the Battery.

If you were only putting in 12 volts into your battery it would eventually become flat. Therefore the system has to generate more voltage than the battery's rated voltage to overcome the internal resistance of the battery and thus permit charging. The variance in the regulator is there to take account of the draw you are putting on the battery and the residual level of charge. In essence if you are drawing significant amps form electronics or draining the battery from constant short stop starts, this will result in a higher charge rate. It would also be useful to check the condition of the battery by using a high rate discharge or specific gravity test for each cell.

Ill hang up my cagoul now and all the best
__________________
DJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 05:22   #4
Member
 
donald463's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Stranraer
Make: No Boat now
Length: no boat
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
I had this problem with a Suzuki 15 HP outboard causing Plotter to display overlaod voltage. I fitted a 24v to 12v regulator designed for lorries etc between outboard charger lead and battery. Ran all electrics directly from battery. Problem solved never more than 13.8volts. More than enough to keep battery charged.
Item number: 170447617324 is similar. Also check out solar/wind regulators.
__________________
donald463 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 05:34   #5
DJS
Member
 
Country: UK - N Ireland
Boat name: *
Make: replacement soon!
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 143
[QUOTE=donald463;389707] Ran all electrics directly from battery. Problem solved never more than 13.8volts. More than enough to keep battery charged.


All electrics should be from the battery-perfect
__________________
DJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 11:55   #6
Member
 
donald463's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Stranraer
Make: No Boat now
Length: no boat
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 120
All electrics should be from the battery-perfect [/QUOTE]

Manual start outboard and only nav lights and fish finder NO battery fitted when purchased.
Not the best way to make newbies welcome!!
__________________
donald463 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 12:24   #7
DJS
Member
 
Country: UK - N Ireland
Boat name: *
Make: replacement soon!
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by donald463 View Post
All electrics should be from the battery-perfect
Manual start outboard and only nav lights and fish finder NO battery fitted when purchased.
Not the best way to make newbies welcome!! [/QUOTE]

I think something has got lost in translation here as I was agreeing with your previous post!

Oh and welcome:
__________________
DJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 February 2011, 15:11   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Make: HumberOceanOffshore
Length: 8m +
Engine: Volvo KAD300/DPX
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,962
Check your wiring harness. The charging output on some of those engines was simply AC and intended for powering nav lights. From memory, the AC output was via a pair of green cables which came down from under the flywheel. If this is the case, the output needs to be rectified to convert it to DC (though it will be bumpy DC) then it requires a voltage regulator for battery charging. The fluctuating DC will be smoothed by the use of a battery.
__________________
JW.
jwalker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 23 February 2011, 19:24   #9
Member
 
Vandad's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 8m +
Engine: 250hp
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 195
DO NOT TRUST YOUR lowrance!!!!

I had exactly similiar problem! On the screen it was showing random number up to like 18V! and I thought my regulator is dead! It was just loose connection in the actual device NOT the main electrics!

Buy a voltmeter, check your battery voltage when the engine is off. It should read between 11.5V - 13V. (11.5 means your battery is not fully charged).

Once you switch on the engine, it should go up to about 14V (or even 14.5V)

ANDDDDD

You must see a difference between low idle voltage and when you rev the engine.


Hope it helps.
__________________
Vandad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16 March 2011, 11:37   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset
Boat name: Seabadger
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140
MMSI: -
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 504
The engines have the pre-described green wires coming out from beneath the flywheel these then link to a black box of electronic wizardry on the engine then continue to the battery...

When I use a voltmeter to check the voltage I get a reading of 26volts for AC and 14 volts for DC at fast tickover.

What is the best way to determine if it is DC or AC voltage? I only have a basic voltmeter...

Thanks
__________________

__________________
diver 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 21:37.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.