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Old 13 February 2014, 15:30   #1
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MAIB report info

This has just come through a colleague and is worth a read

http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources...ieve_Flyer.pdf
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Old 13 February 2014, 16:49   #2
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Quite a lot of discussion on this one on post 'importance of DSC' (posted 10th jan)

With regards to MAIB currently on a social media drive
All reports, fliers and digests can be found in the website www.maib.gov.uk
Also the new face book account www.facebook.com/marine accident investigation branch
On twitter #marine accident investigation branch
And their own you tube channel - search you tube for 'marine accident investigation branch' and see a video of some of the Milly trials.
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Old 13 February 2014, 16:57   #3
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Hadn't seen that report before, how tragic to loose a life for a press of a red button , must be devastating ........
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Old 13 February 2014, 17:12   #4
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Hadn't seen that report before, how tragic to loose a life for a press of a red button , must be devastating ........
Sometimes, there are only seconds. Make 'em count skippers!

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Old 15 February 2014, 05:09   #5
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Sometimes, there are only seconds. Make 'em count skippers!
Even wearing lifejackets one of the crew briefly submerges for a few seconds then seems to surface with the rest of the floatsom looking at the vid in slow motion seems like he gets pulled under wonder if he got caught up in something , thanks wilk for posting .
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Old 15 February 2014, 06:47   #6
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I'm very interested in the reactions/responses of skippers and crews to developing problems. I've asked a lot of nosy questions from the various SAR types that I know.

Certainly, men will often attempt to recover a situation well past the point where they should be beginning full on emergency procedures. I guess it is an attempt to "normalise" a situation and be seen to be coping with it (Monty Python "it's just a flesh wound").

This can take the form of PAX not wearing lifejackets AFTER a Sinking MAYDAY has been sent. In the video above, the crew have called for help but have no handheld VHF nor have they deployed the liferaft. I have to guess that they spent time trying to deal with the flooding instead...

I have seen cases where boats were awash and PAX still didn't have LJs on.

It is COMMON for the CG to get a phonecall from a trawler asking if someone could bring them a pumpset as they had a "bit of a leak" but not to make a big fuss about it....

Last year a local fishing boat SANK near it's home port. The only comms were from one crew member PHONING his mother to say goodbye. No comms were made to the CG. Presumably the skipper was "coping" until he hit the water...

The DSC button is there for a reason, USE IT early and cope later.
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Old 15 February 2014, 07:55   #7
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I'm very interested in the reactions/responses of skippers and crews to developing problems.........guess that they spent time trying to deal with the ... The DSC button is there for a reason, USE IT early and cope later.
I think your spot on, I also think the "it'll be ok" stiff upper lip attitude doesn't help, and I'm sure the is some feelings of embarrassment too. If in doubt... Get the help out! They would prefer that too!
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Old 15 February 2014, 08:25   #8
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This is precisely why I am so interested in this phenomenon - I don't know what causes it and I'd like to recognise that "tipping point" in a crisis and know that no matter how I feel about it, the time has come to call for help.

I'm certainly as susceptible to this reaction as anyone else. I've looked back at some situations and shuddered at the stupid risks I took, with my own life and those of others.

I think the silliest was crawling into a smoke filled building dragging a fire extinguisher to fight a machinery fire

Although breaking down the door of a basement paint store from which smoke was issuing, only to find a 20L drum of thinners surrounded by smouldering dustsheets was a close second

Working to clear ice from a flooding 10m high flat roof, in the dark, without help, safety gear or railings wasn't too bright either.

And I can think of a few instances where I tried to "normalise" the situation for people who were having heart attacks


So, for me now, it's all about where a thing MIGHT go next if I can't turn it around pronto. I was trying to explain this to someone recently and ended up drawing on advice I read years ago:

Always determine if taking an action will leave you with options after you take that action. If the action fails to resolve your problem, are you completely fkkd?

An example: If you open a hatch and find a hull full of seawater, are you going to commence pumping until you save the boat or sink? Or are you going to call it in first and then pump like a good'un?
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Old 15 February 2014, 10:38   #9
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This is precisely why I am so interested in this phenomenon - I don't know what causes it and I'd like to recognise that "tipping point" in a crisis and know that no matter how I feel about it, the time has come to call for help.

I'm certainly as susceptible to this reaction as anyone else. I've looked back at some situations and shuddered at the stupid risks I took, with my own life and those of others.

I think the silliest was crawling into a smoke filled building dragging a fire extinguisher to fight a machinery fire

Although breaking down the door of a basement paint store from which smoke was issuing, only to find a 20L drum of thinners surrounded by smouldering dustsheets was a close second

Working to clear ice from a flooding 10m high flat roof, in the dark, without help, safety gear or railings wasn't too bright either.

And I can think of a few instances where I tried to "normalise" the situation for people who were having heart attacks


So, for me now, it's all about where a thing MIGHT go next if I can't turn it around pronto. I was trying to explain this to someone recently and ended up drawing on advice I read years ago:

Always determine if taking an action will leave you with options after you take that action. If the action fails to resolve your problem, are you completely fkkd?

An example: If you open a hatch and find a hull full of seawater, are you going to commence pumping until you save the boat or sink? Or are you going to call it in first and then pump like a good'un?
Very interesting.

The only thing we have to rely on when the sh1te hits the fan is the sum of our prior experiences, combined with stuff we've read on forums, in trade press, etc, that's buried in the deepest, darkest, recesses of our brains.

I worked as a volunteer skipper for the Ocean Youth Trust and managed to lose a fighting-fit 22 year old volunteer Bosun over the side in a force 8 off Puffin Island in the Irish Sea in November 2010. We were never more than 50 metres from the guy and I managed to get the (86') yacht back alongside him within a couple of minutes but the first thing I did as events unfolded was hit the red DSC button on the radio to alert the CG.

It took us 8 minutes to recover the guy back on board (the helicopter strop was useless because he'd lost all strength in his arms so it kept sliding off him) but the radio call to HMCG to cancel the helicopter was the most satisfying radio comm ever. We still had to keep a very careful eye on the guy for secondary drowning symptoms, delayed shock etc but I was soooo glad we'd called the CG immediately because unfolding events consumed my thoughts/actions.

Trying to recover the guy, once alongside him, was challenging to say the least so the overiding advice is to contact the CG asap and then, as events unfold, you can always contact them to cancel any assistance but if you try to sort it yourself, delaying any call for outside help, you really do run the risk of waiting too long before admitting things have got out of hand.
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Old 16 February 2014, 12:39   #10
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.... so the overiding advice is to contact the CG asap and then, as events unfold, you can always contact them to cancel any assistance but if you try to sort it yourself, delaying any call for outside help, you really do run the risk of waiting too long before admitting things have got out of hand.
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