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Old 25 June 2003, 05:50   #1
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Bilge Pumps

I seem scrap a lot of Bilge pumps both Auto and Manual, mostly made by Rule. does any body have any view on good or bad makes of pumps.

We do clean the filters and stuff, I am trying a new make called Pirranna at themoment which seem quite well made.

Does anybody know of a a good float switch.
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Old 25 June 2003, 11:03   #2
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We have Rule pumps fitted to most of our boats.

Reliable , efficient, easy to maintain and clean.

Reasonably priced.

Not something we shout about in the pub but now that I think about it ... Yes we like them !!

Best wishes,

Stuart
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Old 01 July 2003, 14:14   #3
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What type of float switch are you after? how are you mounting it? Rule do their own ,about £15 I think or you could go for an industrial one ,horizontally or vertically mounted, which would last indefinately. Then there is the type that is tethered to the pump by its cable. I'm not sure if I have ever used one small enough for a RIB though.
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Jizm


Horizontal type:
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Old 01 July 2003, 14:15   #4
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Or vertical type:
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Old 01 July 2003, 14:17   #5
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Or free floating type: (quite large though).
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Old 01 July 2003, 14:35   #6
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Where can I get these from?
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Old 01 July 2003, 14:50   #7
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Which type are you after? I may have the horizontal type in stock. RS components in Hedge End supply all three.
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Old 01 July 2003, 15:48   #8
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Dear bilge pump sperts

After the float has dropped to a level where is cuts the pump out should the contents of the pipe which hasnít been expelled out of the boat return into the bilge or should there be a non-return valve in the pump to stop this happening.

After shutting off I have noticed that my Johnson pump returns the water back into the bilge. The amount of water is not enough to kick the pump in, but this gets on my nerves, as I really want the engine bay to be dry.

As to why the water is in there in the first place is still under investigation.

Cheers

Mark
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Old 01 July 2003, 16:11   #9
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Mark
I had this problem with my Avon.
You do need a non-return valve, positioned next to the pump itself, on the "out" pipe.
That fixed it.

Water also ALWAYS used to enter between the two hulls, despite initially there being "absolutely no way it could get in". But it did. Loads of it. And of course the only way to drain it was to lift the boat out of the water, tip it up, and take out the 4 inch long, high quality, hugely expensive, brass ("this will definatley not leak water into your boat, sir") bung.
So eventually I had one pump on a float switch operating in the inter-hull gap and another sitting at the lowest point in the outboard engine well at the stern. Both pumps wired to be permanently live.
Worked beautifully that. Until one day some seaweed got caught in the float switch, jamming it permanently open and burned the pump out before draining the battery.
Ho Hum.
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Old 01 July 2003, 16:29   #10
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bbilge pumps

I dont like the idea of pumps as they are permanetly connected to the battery,you might think just because the pump is off this dosent matter much, however before we fitted battery switches to the boat we had serious electrolisis taking place at the anodes .Bear in mind this is with everything off, there are often times when fumbiling around in the console with wet hands especially if you have cuts you can touch off things and due to moisture etc etc get shocked from the 12 volt system, its not a shock but a tingle.But more importantly it shows that with stuff switched off you can, in damp conditions get stray current flow or Leakage.This leakage is deadly when it comes to electrolisis as it excells it.Pumps which often submerge in water and have water flowing tro their casings are bound to suffer from electricial leakage, especially pumps as they are often in damp bilges or partially covered in water until the float mechasim switches.I feel that fitting pumps permanetly wired to your rib is dangerous as it is an electricial load which may stick on, or worse, potentially leaks electrically and apart from running a battery down in a fault situation, is in damp conditions potentially leaking current is causing increased electrolisis .My work takes me to domestic houses ,schools, offices etc and you would not believe the amount of leaks from equipment leaking current considered normal in bone dry conditions.I am talking miliamps here but thats all that is needed to electroplate for instance never mind electrical corrision which is a huge problem on boats.i would steer clear of auto wired pumps
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