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Old 28 April 2012, 08:35   #11
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Originally Posted by lifeboatman3 View Post
Wash with fresh water then remove the plugs. Then trunning it over but for the first time be very gentle pulling the starter cored. If you go too hard it can cause hydrolic squeeze as the water cant get out fast enough which can crack and bend things. Pull about 50-70 times, which isnt that hard as the pluggs are out. Put the pluggs in finger tight and crank 10 times. Pluggs out and crank again 20-30 time to get the last of the water out. You can blow on the pluggs to dry and dip in some petrol and then put them back in tights and put the caps back on. The prime the fuel bulb and choke out and if poss get someone to hold the throttle flat out and give it a go.
The more time you spend getting the water out the better chance of starting. This is what we do with the Lifeboat's 50hp Mariners.
For general SiBBErs as above but on some engines if its fitted with a carb theres usually a small drain screw on the bottom of the bowl that can be Slackened to drain out any fuel/water that can be purged out using the priming bulb ,
(as a matter of intrest some of the older d class engines had a larger handle/valve fitted in place so it wasent as fiddly with a screw driver )

reason i am saying this is you shouldednt get any water in the fuel tank if your using a sealed flexi /bladder tank on say a zapcat but for anyone else that capsizes with a normal fuel tank a slight amount water can and usually does get drawn in through the air blead screw on the fuel tank owing to the water tempeture then cooling and causing a vacume in the tank ,
that is is if the tanks not strapped down or it can touch the water level.
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Old 28 April 2012, 12:22   #12
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bottom plug is all that is needed on the three cylinder 2 stroke. Open the carb to get as much fuel through as possible and turn it over a good few times. Plug back in and get it running and keep it running for a good amount of time to get it hot. Touch wood I have never had to do this with my zapcat but I have done it on other peoples. Best to try to stay the right way up ;-)
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Old 01 May 2012, 16:33   #13
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Hi, I'm new on here and have no experience with outboards but I do have a book out from the library called outboard maintenance by ed sherman. He talks about saving drowned engines towards the end and on top of draining the carbs and getting the water out of the cylinders as already mentioned, he also recommends removing all the electrical equipment, rinsing, drying, dowsing with wd40 and then drying again before reinstalling. Even then apparently if the coils on the engine aren't completely epoxy sealed then these could still fail prematurely.
Hope that helps
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Old 01 May 2012, 17:00   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adriatic305
Hi, I'm new on here and have no experience with outboards but I do have a book out from the library called outboard maintenance by ed sherman. He talks about saving drowned engines towards the end and on top of draining the carbs and getting the water out of the cylinders as already mentioned, he also recommends removing all the electrical equipment, rinsing, drying, dowsing with wd40 and then drying again before reinstalling. Even then apparently if the coils on the engine aren't completely epoxy sealed then these could still fail prematurely.
Hope that helps
most modern engines are A bit more water resistant and forgiving than the older points ignition ones , but you only need some salt crystals left in a hidden void ,cracks in the epoxy seals on coils ect or getting inside a grommet or wiring connections for it to start corrosion issues or bad electric problems a few months later even if using copies amount of wd40 and the like .
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