Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05 September 2012, 15:48   #1
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset
Boat name: Seabadger
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 435
Stupid Engine Mounts!!!

Just before heading out for the airshow I noticed there was significant play in the outboard - on checking the lower engine mounts (cylindrical metalastic bushes) had failed causing the leg of the engine (1998 Merc 90) to slide back and forth about 70mm.

Already noted a lot of corrosion around the top mounts / top of the steerer tube when I bought the boat and could see that the lower mounts were rough so no big surprise and glad that I noticed they had failed.

However this is the 3rd outboard I've changed mounts on and I still can't understand

1) why manufacturers don't use stainless bolts and mounts that don't require engine block removal (can anyone tell me if there are any 100hp + outboards which have changeable mounts without the powerhead removal - I might buy one next time!)

2) how stupidly expensive the mounts are! 250 for 4 mounts and a gasket!! Last time I took the old to about a dozen motor factors some of whom could almost but not exactly match the mounts with bushes from various cars. The equivalent car bushes were retailling at about 10 each, I know they are more massed produced but even so think 70-80 each is too high! Is there a solution to make mounts out of something / use rigid mounts/ something cheaper? I've ordered these ones now, but would be keen to know for next time.

I think the poor roads here may partly to blame, towing back and forth from kimmeridge and poole the roads are pretty poor in places. The engine tilted up is going to sway a lot. There isn't really a clever way to support it as far as I can see - tilt up and lock - anyone suggest any better?

Sorry for the moan. Rant over!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P9050004.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	154.7 KB
ID:	71877   Click image for larger version

Name:	P9050005.jpg
Views:	153
Size:	181.2 KB
ID:	71878   Click image for larger version

Name:	P9050008.jpg
Views:	174
Size:	172.6 KB
ID:	71879  

diver 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05 September 2012, 17:07   #2
Country: UK - England
Town: Northampton
Make: RibTec
Length: 5m +
Engine: Outbaord mariner 75
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 506
Tilt up and lower onto wooden block between engine and saddle.

ratchet strap across tilted engine to stop it moving.

will post a piccy when I take it out next as its lowered at the moment.


jezza2011 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10 September 2012, 06:27   #3
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,538
It's not a new problem. Same thing with a 1970s Clamshell / Blueband 50 / 60......

I think the problem is to make them look "sleek" above the water line, the mounts are hidden inside. Why they can't design the mouts to last is another rant.....
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities

Copyright 2002-2015 Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:08.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.