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Old 08 November 2019, 07:10   #1
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Fuel Stabiliser

Any tips for adding fuel stabiliser?

I know it seems obvious - pour it in the tank! - but my Mercury 225 2 stroke was only serviced in August, Mercury main dealer advised wont need another service in the spring but recommended I just add fuel stabiliser for the winter.

I'm looking for guidance as to how/where to add it. I think my (180l) onboard tank is probably at least half full, should i just add to the fuel tank and run the engine for 5 minutes? Is the idea to stabilise the fuel in the tank or tank plus engine - if the latter then surely the stabiliser is unlikely to work its way through to the engine?

Or someone just tell me if i'm over thinking this!!!!
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Old 08 November 2019, 09:34   #2
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i've just used wynns stuff in the past but i've had water problems which has cost me a fortune to get to the bottom of now i know what the problem is i've ordered this stuff

https://aquafax.co.uk/product/n-5595...ditioner-250ml
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Old 08 November 2019, 13:50   #3
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I used to use evinrude 2+4 fuel conditioner and never had any problems with fuel related issues. Then I stopped using it, and Iíve not had any fuel related issues
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Old 08 November 2019, 15:02   #4
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Originally Posted by Pikey Dave View Post
I used to use evinrude 2+4 fuel conditioner and never had any problems with fuel related issues. Then I stopped using it, and Iíve not had any fuel related issues
Quoting Kenneth Williams:
"I'm sprinkling woofle dust! I'm sprinkling woofle dust to frighten away the wild elephants!" And he was supposed to say "There are no wild elephants around here" and I would say "Well, this isn't real woofle dust."
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Old 08 November 2019, 15:16   #5
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I have a 70l tank I add the correct amount of stabiliser quikstor is my preference.......add it, fill tank, drive to beach, go for jolly, go home.......

If I can’t get to beach drive round a bit to mix it up....run on hose to get stabilised fuel through the lines to injectors..... for £3-4 a year cheap insurance.......

Pointless if fuel is already old...........wont revitalise old fuel
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Old 08 November 2019, 15:36   #6
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i used to use honda stabiliser with petrol inboard mercruisers ,both carb and injection ,however since i have had ribs and outboards i hav,nt bothered ,and never had a problem . My winterisation plan now is to take the boats out once a month /6 weeks ,or run on muffs in the garden . Think the most important thing is to make sure there is no way water can enter fuel tank !
Must say i am down south so not sure whats best in North
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Old 08 November 2019, 16:04   #7
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Hereís a better idea take the boat out and use it then the fuel wonít go off
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Old 08 November 2019, 16:45   #8
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The only thing I do now is brim the tank for the winter layup. Reduces the chance of condensation in the tank.
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Old 08 November 2019, 17:34   #9
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Hereís a better idea take the boat out and use it then the fuel wonít go off


🤣🤣🤣🤣
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Old 09 November 2019, 03:40   #10
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I used to use them but have been put off these days by so many experts in the field calling them nothing more than a big con.
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Old 09 November 2019, 05:12   #11
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The only thing I do now is brim the tank for the winter layup. Reduces the chance of condensation in the tank.
fuel set breaks down water, i'll update the aspen fuel thread after tuesday when i see the engine for myself and for the reason of using this stuff.
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Old 09 November 2019, 12:00   #12
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I used to use them but have been put off these days by so many experts in the field calling them nothing more than a big con.
Iím usually very sceptical but have seen issues with old fuel , not saying stabiliser would have prevented them, but hopefully would help, buying fresh fuel regularly and using it is the best way for certain. But Iíd rather spend £5 on stabiliser than potentially have fuel issues or loose £20-90 worth of fuel due to not being able to get out on the water
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Old Yesterday, 22:22   #13
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I’m usually very sceptical but have seen issues with old fuel , not saying stabiliser would have prevented them, but hopefully would help, buying fresh fuel regularly and using it is the best way for certain. But I’d rather spend £5 on stabiliser than potentially have fuel issues or loose £20-90 worth of fuel due to not being able to get out on the water
Don't get me wrong I also bought several different engine oil and petrol additives which I religiously put in my outboard and landcruiser tow vehicle.

My first time of questioning all this good stuff was when my Toyota 3lt Diesel engine and fuel system was stuffed at just 170000km. I had bought this vehicle from new and after a second opinion from a highly respected precision tuning centre, I was surprised to get told I should not of used any additive, even though some services had them added onto my service costs and recommend I purchased more from them ( from 4x4 centres). That vehicle was sold for scrap at just 4 years old ( just outside of warranty which was apparently void due to using additives).

My mobile outboard mechanic told me to stop using stabiliser in my fuel as it's just a waste of money. Other outboard dealers with shops sell it but when asking different manufacturers of outboards at the Sydney boat whether they recommend it to be used, they stated only use the fuels and oils recommend in the service manual.

I have a very good friend who's an oil specialist, traveling all over the world advising manufacturers on oils etc. I asked if he uses additives in his boat fuel as he rarely gets chance to use it, and no he doesn't use any, even though the company he works for sells several varieties of it.

As mentioned, I know nothing of this stuff, only that those who sell it say I need it. I stopped using it two years ago and have yet to have any issues, even in the lawn mower that only gets used 2-3 times at most each year and has fuel in the can from about 4 years ago. Yes I'm sure there will be a backlash of the usual experts telling me how wrong I am, which is quite possibly right but for now I'm saving my money and not buying into it. Yes I know this fella in the video is talking about car engines but many of our outboards are also car engines. A clear bowl water filter or a filter with an alarm is going to sort out any water problems.

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Old Today, 04:13   #14
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I think there is a difference between fuel stabilisers and fuel additives. The additive is claimed to improve performance / reliability etc and the stabiliser is intended to reduce the effects of varnish and gum which block up the fuel system.

The manual for my Mariner outboard advocates the use of stabiliser if the engine is not being used.

One thing I'm not sure about is whether the stabiliser negates the corrosive effects of ethanol that is mixed with the fuel. My brief bit of research (googling) suggests ethanol absorbs water so if any water is present, the ethanol will absorb it and then unleash corrosion regardless of whether the fuel has been stabilised.

For my outboard I'm going to drain the existing fuel and then run it on Aspen plus treating it to a bit of fogging oil. Hopefully this will minimise the risk of any fuel related issues.
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Old Today, 05:10   #15
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As you accept JonP that guy is talking about cars... and mostly "wonder additives" that clearly are not needed. I have long held that view with cars. Use the correct spec oil & change it on time or earlier... avoid tiny out of the way fuel stations with minimal fuel throughput. And then don't worry.

However the far more intermittent use of many boats (perhaps not yours) and different consequences of a breakdown do mean there is a possibility of an additive helping.

For the small cost (admittedly with small OBs) I'm happy to add that stabiliser additive just in case it helps.
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Old Today, 07:46   #16
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I've got devices built into the engine that mixes the petrol with air and ignites it..........works a treat.
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Old Today, 15:22   #17
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May have been posted before and no idea what it will do other than fuel the fire....

https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp-co...gehandling.pdf

But certainly suggest there is a quite limited lifespan of fuel in equipment tanks doesn’t mention adding anything (other than more fresh fuel) though...
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Old Today, 15:44   #18
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Bear in mind whilst at sea air is being drawn into the tank in more humid conditions, that condensates and ethernol picks it up recently talking to two dealers and Suzuki marine about my problem water is becoming more of a problem fuel set for me from now on
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Old Today, 16:26   #19
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Originally Posted by Fenlander View Post
As you accept JonP that guy is talking about cars... and mostly "wonder additives" that clearly are not needed. I have long held that view with cars. Use the correct spec oil & change it on time or earlier... avoid tiny out of the way fuel stations with minimal fuel throughput. And then don't worry.

However the far more intermittent use of many boats (perhaps not yours) and different consequences of a breakdown do mean there is a possibility of an additive helping.

For the small cost (admittedly with small OBs) I'm happy to add that stabiliser additive just in case it helps.

My family live on the IOW and claim they only have one variety of petrol ( not sure if it's true ) here we have e10 10% blend, regular unleaded 91, 95 octane and 98 octane. Pretty much every boat and engine dealer state to stay away from e10 due to the adverse effects of ethanol.
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Old Today, 16:26   #20
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May have been posted before and no idea what it will do other than fuel the fire....

https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp-co...gehandling.pdf

But certainly suggest there is a quite limited lifespan of fuel in equipment tanks doesn’t mention adding anything (other than more fresh fuel) though...
I was wrong it does

Quote:

Long term storage
When preparing to store a boat for extended periods e.g. two months or more, it is best to completely remove all fuel from the tank. If it is difficult or not possible to remove the fuel, maintaining a full tank of fuel and including a fuel stabiliser to provide fuel stability and corrosion protection is recommended. A partially full tank is not recommended because the void space above the fuel allows air movement that can bring in water through condensation as the temperature cycles up and down. This condensation can potentially create operational problems.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffstevens763@g View Post
Bear in mind whilst at sea air is being drawn into the tank in more humid conditions, that condensates and ethernol picks it up recently talking to two dealers and Suzuki marine about my problem water is becoming more of a problem fuel set for me from now on
Well I will continue to add stabiliser when putting away for any length of time need to try and get out and burn through soMe more fuel if I can.......
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