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Old 24 February 2008, 02:54   #1
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50:1 Mix Storage

I have a 12 Ltr tank of 50:1 mix

I was talking to someone the other day and they said that this mix does not store well.

Its been in the garage for thw winter

Is it safe to use ?

If not ..... what on earth do you do with it?
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Old 24 February 2008, 04:09   #2
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The general concensus is that 50:1 won't last more than a couple of months in a can. Like all these things its not as simple as that and it depends on how tight a seal was on the can, how much air was in it to start with etc - and possibly even if it is a steel or plastic can.

The risks are that the volatile compounds which generally ignite easiest have been lost (evaporated) and so it will be harder to start the engine and that the oils will have started to form gums which block filters/carbs. If there is any chance water got in there (including by condensation) then you might have bacteria growing too! So if you have a different way to use the fuel, e.g. in a lawn mower that would be a safer option.

If you really want to use it in your outboard I would mix it with fresh fuel and oil first. But there will be people on here who will tell you they have used much older fuel no problem. Are you willing to take the risk if you need to call out the lifeboat to get home though?
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Old 24 February 2008, 06:49   #3
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Be very careful about using old outboard fuel in a lawnmower, strimmer, chainsaw, etc. 2str outboard oil is not suitable for them. I knackered my strimmer after just occasional use over two years. First thing the dealer said was, 'You've been using outboard fuel, haven't you?' He sees it all the time.

I think outboards must run cooler than other engines and the oil can't cope with higher temperatures.

I would just add some fresh fuel to the older stuff and use it in the outboard. Or, maybe, add small quantities of the old to the new.
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Old 24 February 2008, 06:57   #4
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Quote:
But there will be people on here who will tell you they have used much older fuel no problem.
I ran my Mariner 15 on some premixed fuel that we know was at least 2 years old. It had been stored in a metal fuel tank in a shed. The engine started first pull with it with no adverse affects.

Mixing it with fresh fuel is probably the way to go though.
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Old 24 February 2008, 08:38   #5
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Originally Posted by alystra View Post
Be very careful about using old outboard fuel in a lawnmower, strimmer, chainsaw, etc. 2str outboard oil is not suitable for them.
good point alystra
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Old 24 February 2008, 17:28   #6
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Thanks Guys

All good stuff

Ta
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Old 24 February 2008, 18:21   #7
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Should be OK as long as you've added fuel stabiliser before storing it.
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Old 25 February 2008, 07:10   #8
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I'll second Tim's post - Started (& ran) the old Johnsorude on a year old mix.
Soyeah, add some fresh & should be OK.
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Old 25 February 2008, 09:47   #9
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Or put it in your car... provided you car runs on petrol and not diesel

As long as you've got a 1/2 of a tank or more in the car it'll be diluted and will not be a problem, been doing that for years.
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Old 25 February 2008, 19:24   #10
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Diesel cars go great in the winter with a bit of petrol in them - it thins out the cooking oil nicely!!!
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