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Old 22 July 2006, 17:36   #11
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There's a lot of it about! Girl on L2 instructor course elsewhere for which I went and did the moderation told me that a notation for 7.2 metres on the chart actually meant it was 7 metres deep at high water and 2metres deep at low water! Not a clue on bouyage, variation etc. She had done a level 2, an advanced and two days of an instructor course at three different coastal centres around the country and basically knew nothing. So confident was she in her knowledge and ability that she argued the point when I told her her knowledge was sadly lacking and she had to pass as she had a course for 6 people booked for her to teach the next weekend! Hmm madam I dont think so I'm afraid!
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Old 23 July 2006, 12:34   #12
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I Know what you mean. The other things that bugs me is the amount of Powerboat Instructors that can only drive RIBS and havn't got a clue about hard boats, there should be a section od an instructor course on hard boats.

Also on another note where would an Examiner draw the line on classrooms??? we have now a local centre in a beach hut with no toilet or showers and somone using their front room as a classroom.

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Old 23 July 2006, 20:18   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jono Garton
we have now a local centre in a beach hut with no toilet or showers and somone using their front room as a classroom.
That's a nice piece of misinformation if ever there was. There's a career waiting for you as a spin doctor for the labour party now that Alistair Campbell has retired.

For the record, the beach hut is a superb location on Abersoch beach for a vibrant sailing school. www.abersochsailing school.co.uk They also have access to toilets/showers as per RYA guidelines and have recently passed their RYA annual inspection.

The front room comment is directed at me and our new centre in Pwllheli which has also passed a recent RYA inspection with flying colours.

What Mr. Garton neglects to say is that you can enjoy en suite accomodation in a guest house run by ribsters, a good breakfast and straight into a fully equipped classroom with an excellent range of teaching aids and equipment .




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Old 24 July 2006, 04:58   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavelength
...Not a clue on bouyage, variation etc. She had done a level 2, an advanced and two days of an instructor course at three different coastal centres around the country and basically knew nothing.....
Perhaps she was thi....er, challenged.
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Old 24 July 2006, 15:42   #15
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somone using their front room as a classroom.
and the point is what? If he does a good course, is insured correctly and the customers are happy -and someone makes a good brew well fair enough.
As far as the hard boat bit is concerned all instructors start somewhere and their experience grows-its very easy to pull the ladder up after getting the ticket. If the rib man teaches in ribs and is good at it then the job is done. Different folk have different skills for different clients-a diver is best equipped for teaching diving clients as he knows the problems. People who are not aware of the problems faced by sea anglers launching small cuddy boats thru breakers and having to return to the same open beach during winter cod fishing should not be teaching them-it is far different to normal ribbing and a mile away from using a big hardboat. I do have a problem with folk who get a level 2 ticket-go immediatly for an instructors course and then start teaching in their own boat with no experience of working at different centres to see the good and the bad practises. We had someone on here wanting to do that just recently did we not with an obvious lack of knowledge. On the hard boat thing-I'll put a post on re my daughters recent escapades to show how some young instructors are exceptionally good at hardboats
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Old 24 July 2006, 16:01   #16
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Originally Posted by davidmanning
What Mr. Garton neglects to say is that you can enjoy en suite accomodation in a guest house run by ribsters, a good breakfast and straight into a fully equipped classroom with an excellent range of teaching aids and equipment .
Nice bit of marketing there! Certainly sounds more appealing than the portacabin with tressel tables where I did my L2. Although surely the centre is secondary to the time spend on the water, quality of instruction (and in my opinion student to instructor ratio) and boats used. I was surprised that it was possible to get a L2 without driving displacement craft as well as planing craft.
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Old 24 July 2006, 16:11   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmanning

What Mr. Garton neglects to say is that you can enjoy en suite accomodation in a guest house run by ribsters, a good breakfast and straight into a fully equipped classroom with an excellent range of teaching aids and equipment .

DM
Sounds perfect to me
Wake up shower, Breakfast, walk a couple of feet to the classroom .
Perhaps a touch of the green eyed monster there Jono
You should try operating in the Solent Jono, now this is where the real competition is, but even so most of us get along fine even push clients each others way when we are booked up .
And try and remember Jono you were once a Instructor with not much experience yourself , it takes time to develop the skills needed for different types of boats and some Instructors will only ever work with Ribs don't mean to say they are no good though does it.
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Old 24 July 2006, 16:19   #18
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If I had a recommendation it would be for the Safety Boat course to include RYA sailing 1 & 2,
safety boat crews/instructors should really be sailors of some sort to appreciate the tricks of the wind on sails. We had a lifeboat crew injured a few weeks ago when a windsurfing rig took him by surprise when they turned it into the wind and it flipped on them. An experienced sailor/ windsurfer would no doubt have been more ready for the violence the sail came over with cos it was certainly blowin a hoolie at the time and most windsurfers have had a crack from the rig on a few occassions to remind them of the consequences of backing the rig upwind
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Old 24 July 2006, 16:36   #19
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Originally Posted by tim griffin
You should try operating in the Solent Jono,
He did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tim griffin
now this is where the real competition is,
I suspect he would be in agreement with you here Tim.
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Old 24 July 2006, 17:18   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavelength
safety boat crews/instructors should really be sailors of some sort to appreciate the tricks of the wind on sails. We had a lifeboat crew injured a few weeks ago when a windsurfing rig took him by surprise when they turned it into the wind and it flipped on them. An experienced sailor/ windsurfer would no doubt have been more ready for the violence the sail came over with cos it was certainly blowin a hoolie at the time and most windsurfers have had a crack from the rig on a few occassions to remind them of the consequences of backing the rig upwind
Plenty experienced sailors have been taken by surprise by the boom too. Perhaps this needs covered (maybe it is, i'm not rya safety boat trained) in the SB training - although there are likely so many other things to think about it is easy to forget the invisible one.

Personally though (as a former dinghy sailor) I always preferred SB crews who were more focussed on what they do with the powerboat and their safety responsibilities rather than those who were frustrated sailors stuck in a rib for the day. Also remember that the SB course is supposed to be for canooing, wind surfing etc - surely we can't expect them to all be BCU 2* trained, and windsurf trained etc too. I would rather they used that time to improve their boat handling, rescue/recovery skills and first aid. The latter is particularly important IMHO. And in my experience rarely at the level you might expect and probably never practiced in the three years between requalifying.
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