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Old 10 November 2005, 12:44   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
HOW??? Are you in the correct gear with your foot pressed down on the clutch then?

ANY gear will provide some engine braking - obviously the lower the gear the more the effect.
when pressed down on the clutch the engine is pulled apart waiting to be put into gear......
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Old 10 November 2005, 12:47   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
Obviously I drive vehicles a bit harder than you.
As you said, possibly it's driving technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
How can you blankly state "you are wrong" because you own ONE of these??? I had BOTH the manual and the auto a short time apart - ok maybe I drive harder than most but I drove the auto the same as the manual - and there ARE differences.
Easy. You stated your point as though it was fact that all of these vehicles had that characteristic. Had you said that in your experience of driving one of these vehicle it was what you found to be the case, who am I to argue with that?

Quote:
Because on long downhills you can get brake fade which is pretty scary!!!
Well yes, but you'd have to be seriously brutal with disc brakes to get them to the point of fading. I've seen mine red hot and still working fine. Drums would be a different story and it may be one of the reasons changing down to a lower gear is still recommended for heavy vehicles.

Whilst it is good practice on particularly steep hills, just as a vehicle control measure, the majority of british main roads do not have inclines steep enough to require it.

Your comment about changing an auto manually into a lower gear when approaching a junction and also not manually changing down into too low a gear, indicate that you're not particularly experienced in driving vehicles with auto boxes. In the first case that is entirely unnecessary and in the second case the auto box will not change down into a gear which is too low, even if you move the gear lever to a low position.
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Old 10 November 2005, 12:53   #53
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Ah Ha.

I knew I had seen Codprawn some where. He was the twit in front of me who suddenly went from 70 to 55 without showing any break lights 1 mile before a roundabout, then from 50 to 30 at 1/2 mile still without lights.
Must have been the 5th - 3rd change and then 3rd to 2nd.

Anyway back to auto boxes (sort of).
Torque converters sort of work in one direction and even less in the other. Pulling the lever back just makes the converter slip and has little effect on road speed.
How do I know? I have just been out and tried it.
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Old 10 November 2005, 12:57   #54
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Cod, a question for you. While I'm aware of the rule/advice about using engine braking in preference to using the vehicle brakes and it is a long standing recommendation, explain to me the difference?

In one case, the engine is providing a load which acts upon the drive train and thence upon the wheel through the wheel mounting flange. In the second case the brakes are providing a load which is acting upon the wheel through the wheel mounting flange.
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Old 10 November 2005, 12:57   #55
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Driver training notes for Ambulance drivers…

You take your foot off the pedal in the middle and

A) It’s surprisingly quiet (We’ll talk about “starting the engine” when you’ve mastered the basics)
B) The big van starts to roll (We’ll discuss that levery thing down by the side of your chair later)
C) Your colleague in the back starts to laugh nervously…

You press your right foot down on the right pedal and

A) The engine gets louder
B) The big van goes quicker
C) Your colleague in the back slips and sticks the needle straight in your patients eye

You take your right foot off the right pedal and

A) The engine gets quieter
B) The big van goes slower
C) Your colleague in the back misses the vein again

You press your right foot hard down on the pedal in the middle and

A) Those black rubbery things called tyres start to make a peculiar noise
B) The big van screeches to a halt
C) Your colleague in the back smashes into the bulkhead along with your patient.....................
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Old 10 November 2005, 13:00   #56
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Quote:
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Well yes, but you'd have to be seriously brutal with disc brakes to get them to the point of fading. I've seen mine red hot and still working fine.
Agreed. But the do stop being quite so effective when hot enough to melt the hub caps.
Rented Montego somewhere just north of Chez Codprawn back when the RAC Rally was a real one. We had to stop at a pub and let them cool.
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Old 10 November 2005, 13:01   #57
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Completely unrelated but just had this sent to me....
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Old 10 November 2005, 13:06   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
As you said, possibly it's driving technique.

Well yes, but you'd have to be seriously brutal with disc brakes to get them to the point of fading. I've seen mine red hot and still working fine. Drums would be a different story and it may be one of the reasons changing down to a lower gear is still recommended for heavy vehicles.

Whilst it is good practice on particularly steep hills, just as a vehicle control measure, the majority of british main roads do not have inclines steep enough to require it.

Your comment about changing an auto manually into a lower gear when approaching a junction and also not manually changing down into too low a gear, indicate that you're not particularly experienced in driving vehicles with auto boxes. In the first case that is entirely unnecessary and in the second case the auto box will not change down into a gear which is too low, even if you move the gear lever to a low position.
I have a hell of a lot of experience with autos - in fact I have probably driven over 500,000 miles in autos. Both onroad and offroad.

I don't ALWAYS use an autobox like a manual - mainly on long steep hills etc although I do change down on roundabouts etc to avoid kickdown which can unsettle the handling. A toyota Supra twinturbo is a classic example of this - if you get unwanted kickdown in the wet you are in trouble.

I have often had brake fade - yes it is far more common with drums but the only vehicle I have with drums is the 110 and that is only at the rear. I have even provoked a Ferrari 360 into brake fade but I was really trying!!!

As to British main roads not needing it I can think of plenty in Wales that do!!!

I had read that you can't put an autobox into too low a gear but I have NEVER tried - I have too much mechanical empathy for that!!!
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Old 10 November 2005, 13:14   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
I have a hell of a lot of experience with autos - in fact I have probably driven over 500,000 miles in autos.......
I don’t know how that is possible when you don’t get up until midday and then spend the rest of your time on here O Great one maybe the power of the farce is very strong with you or perhaps it is virtual driving while in your bedroom Learn us how you do it O great one .
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Old 10 November 2005, 13:16   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
in fact I have probably driven over 500,000 miles
Sounds to me like you need lessons. You don't seem to understand the basic principles of defensive driving or that there may be driving techniques of which you are unaware.

Now, don't tell me. You've never had an accident.

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