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Old 19 February 2012, 14:34   #21
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If there was a risk of buggering the transom through towing with the engine up I'd be really worried the transom wouldn't be strong enough in general, the extra load created by having the motor up towing can't be any worse than bouncing around in a big sea.
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Old 19 February 2012, 14:55   #22
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If there was a risk of buggering the transom through towing with the engine up I'd be really worried the transom wouldn't be strong enough in general, the extra load created by having the motor up towing can't be any worse than bouncing around in a big sea.
Especially not with all the horsies neighing as well - I'd rather find out it was due to fall off on land...

The Etec has a trailering support which is about half way up so that's what I use.
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:13   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thomas
If there was a risk of buggering the transom through towing with the engine up I'd be really worried the transom wouldn't be strong enough in general, the extra load created by having the motor up towing can't be any worse than bouncing around in a big sea.
With the motor up bouncing down the road is putting forward and aft forces on the transom trying to bend it. Over time, if you try to bend something backwards and forwards it is more likely to fatigue.

With the motor down the forces are more up and down which in my opinion is less likely to fatigue the transom. There isn't the continual leverage trying to bend the transom backward and forward unless you are wave jumping.

When we check for a wrotten transom, we tend to have the motor up and rock it back and forth to see the flex. It doesn't work so well with the motor down. When up it acts as a large lever.

Of course having it down only works if you have enough clearance to the road.
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:17   #24
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When the motor is in use (ie trimmed down) the strain is on the mounts etc. When trimmed up most of its weight is then balanced like a sea-saw across the transom. Leverage does the damage.

I guess you go with what you've been told. If Ribcraft tell you that, I assume they will cover any damage caused to the transom too likewise with Yam etc.

Trimmed down with a block of wood the risk is taken away altogether and I like that option.

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Old 19 February 2012, 15:18   #25
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Originally Posted by kubcat

With the motor up bouncing down the road is putting forward and aft forces on the transom trying to bend it. Over time, if you try to bend something backwards and forwards it is more likely to fatigue.

With the motor down the forces are more up and down which in my opinion is less likely to fatigue the transom. There isn't the continual leverage trying to bend the transom backward and forward unless you are wave jumping.

When we check for a wrotten transom, we tend to have the motor up and rock it back and forth to see the flex. It doesn't work so well with the motor down. When up it acts as a large lever.

Of course having it down only works if you have enough clearance to the road.
Snap. It took me longer to type out though!

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Old 19 February 2012, 15:24   #26
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Suzuki hand book

I have just read Suzuki handbook it says engine down if enough clearance or part down with support of a transom saver bar or similar, I have 5 year warranty with Ribcraft so I will need to Re-check with them again.
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:33   #27
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I have just read Suzuki handbook it says engine down if enough clearance or part down with support of a transom saver bar or similar, I have 5 year warranty with Ribcraft so I will need to Re-check with them again.
On a new build I'd say your fine either way. On a 5 or 10 year old hull is where the debate would be of any real significance.

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Old 19 February 2012, 15:35   #28
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I do agree and I will change how I tow from now on but would still like to think my transom is strong enough to cope however I tow it.
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:39   #29
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Here is a yamaha option
Yamaha F115 Accessories, Yamaha F115 Outboard Trailering Support

And also
Leave outboard tilted while towing? - Yamaha Outboard Parts Forum
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:40   #30
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My Yamaha manual says "The motor should be trailered in the normal running position. If there is insufficient road clearance in this position, then trailer the motor in the tilt position using a motor support device such as a transom save bar"
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Old 19 February 2012, 15:48   #31
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I'm gonna stick to a lump of wood at that money

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Old 19 February 2012, 15:56   #32
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What about this on ebay ?

item 180815583482
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Old 19 February 2012, 16:02   #33
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What about this on ebay ?

item 180815583482
eBay - The UK's Online Marketplace

Pacer marine- very helpful people
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Old 19 February 2012, 18:05   #34
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Just my tuppence worth:

I trailered my twin 90 Etecs in as downward position as was safe. The built in brackets are NOT for road use. I used a carpeted piece of timber to hold the engines in the chosen position, i.e. skegs just about 18" off the road.

This left the engines kinda balanced over the transom...
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Old 19 February 2012, 18:27   #35
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is what I'm thinking let's see the angles of the dangles
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Old 20 February 2012, 00:18   #36
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is what I'm thinking let's see the angles of the dangles
Good idea...plus, photos of the damage done to a transom from running with the engine up
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Old 20 February 2012, 04:41   #37
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I tow up with a Nice block of wood wupporting the engine as if you use the engine tilt lock its way to high and sticks almost horizontally out.Also the Tilt lock is not desgined to take the weight and loads of a engine being towed and the forces created if you go over a bump etc.
Its just for locking the engine up when the boat is at rest to keep it out the water.
Clearly states in the Manuals " DO NOT TOW WITH THE ENGINE RESTING ON THE TILT LOCK ARM"
I have seen them break, bend or even crack the whole transom mount.

On my engine If its ocassionaly on the tilt lock this causes oils and petrol to leak out.
I expect on a 4 stroke it would not be the best thing for the engine.

So I tow with a specialy chosen block of wood between the engine and the transom brackets.
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Old 20 February 2012, 05:18   #38
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Lightboards must be attached to the trailer not the load. However its more visible where it is so I doubt you'd have problems with the Rozzers!
Boats are a bit of an exception- otherwise every single sailing dinghy with a lighting board on it's pintles would be illegal......

Look at the back of any 7.5T van. How many have the number plate way up top with it's own light, but the tail lights are always 0.5<height<1.5m from the road.....


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I put a block of wood between the engine bracket and the engine when towing. This means the engine is halfway up and doesn't put load on the engine lock.
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Originally Posted by lakelandterrier View Post
I turn the battery isolator off & remove the key whilst towing to prevent any "accidents" with electrics or someone knocking or playing with the tilt. I suppose the transom has to cope with the same weight of engine whatever position it's in.
Ditto on both counts.

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Originally Posted by thomas View Post
If there was a risk of buggering the transom through towing with the engine up I'd be really worried the transom wouldn't be strong enough in general, the extra load created by having the motor up towing can't be any worse than bouncing around in a big sea.
Yep. Think of the force at the prop to shove a ton or so of boat through the water. The engine is realatively well balanced round it's pivot point when fully up.....

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Originally Posted by kubcat View Post
With the motor up bouncing down the road is putting forward and aft forces on the transom trying to bend it. Over time, if you try to bend something backwards and forwards it is more likely to fatigue.
Agreed there are different forces at play to motoring along at sea, but if you think most engines are vaguely balanced round their piviot point when up, and assuming the forces from the trailer are vaguely vertical, it strikes me that there is less chance of transom twist with the engine up?

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Originally Posted by kubcat View Post
When we check for a rotten transom, we tend to have the motor up and rock it back and forth to see the flex. It doesn't work so well with the motor down. When up it acts as a large lever.
Probably because you can get a better grip and swing on it more easily when it's up..... It's just as big a lever when down, just more awkward to give it a good shove!

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Originally Posted by Boats&Outboards View Post
When the motor is in use (ie trimmed down) the strain is on the mounts etc. When trimmed up most of its weight is then balanced like a sea-saw across the transom. Leverage does the damage.
But if it's being held up on a trim ram, the leverage is transmitted about as far down the clamp as you can get it on the most equilateral triangle it can form..... Yes, if it's a manual tilt engine and it's all being held up on a piddly wee pin of course it's going to bend. I've seen bent tilt pins on auxes where the boat lives on a mooring!

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Originally Posted by Boats&Outboards View Post
Trimmed down with a block of wood the risk is taken away altogether and I like that option.
Yep, I have the lump of wood holding the engine as good as full up (speed humps need to be missed!), battery off. The block of wood also has a loop of rope with a snap shackle and engine lashed down to the trim pin in case the hydraulics fail and it works loose the block of wood tie also means I donlt give the car behind a nasty suprise as a 4"x4"x11"-ish lump of timber makes an attempt on joining them in the driver's seat..... Steering is bungee'd hard port so the moving bit of the steering cable is inside the clamp and not picking up all the airbourne cr@pfrom the road on the grease.
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Old 20 February 2012, 05:26   #39
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I'd only disagree that most engines are not well balanced when tilted right up. All am the weight is at the powehead which is balanced over the transom. Whilst your right the ram is holding the weight up When hitting bumps in the road that can flex the transom caused by the sea-saw motions.

Like most have said if your transom cannot take that then there's something wrong anyway but I'd rather not put it to test.
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Old 20 February 2012, 06:14   #40
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I'd only disagree that most engines are not well balanced when tilted right up. All am the weight is at the powehead which is balanced over the transom. Whilst your right the ram is holding the weight up When hitting bumps in the road that can flex the transom caused by the sea-saw motions.

Like most have said if your transom cannot take that then there's something wrong anyway but I'd rather not put it to test.
Ok, maybe I should have been a bit more concise.

Any manual tilt engine I've used has been reasonably balanced when up.

It's an FxD balance. Powerehad = heavy bit but close to pivot. Leg = relatively light, but much further away. Think of carrying a small engine - where is the handle?


I get the feeling we're all singing much the same tune here, just in a different key!
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