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Old 08 December 2005, 18:02   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene
Could someone please post some pictures of the Inverkip area, posible with some nice calm water to show the wife.
There are various pics on these links...

http://www.rib.net/forum/showthread....ighlight=clyde

http://www.rib.net/forum/showthread....ighlight=clyde

http://www.rib.net/forum/showthread....ighlight=clyde

http://www.rib.net/forum/showthread....ighlight=clyde
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Old 09 December 2005, 08:03   #42
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Nice to revisit that write-up!


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Old 09 December 2005, 11:40   #43
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Ribnet conference 2006

We think this is an excellent idea and are keen to join in. We would prefer South Wales as Dylan has suggested but would consider Scotland.

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Old 09 December 2005, 11:56   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Kennett
No problem. OK, hands up who wants to go?


John

John

What I really had in mind was a poll indicating locations

say

Inverkip Scotland
South Wales

This will give an idea how many are up for a conference and which location has the majority vote. Once selected then the local members should undertake the organisation.

I only started the thread anyway got the Littlehampton cruise with Phil Chitty to set up cos yes we will be doing one and that will be subject of a seperate thread in January 06
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Old 09 December 2005, 13:22   #45
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Gary - Thank for the pictures, looking great

Bogi - Your are welcome to give me a shout, the boat is in storage, but we could have a small get together

Andre - DFDS are outrageous when traveling with your boat, if it's more than 6 meters, then it would be better (read a lot cheaper) to drive true france (again).

On the other hand I could "just" launch in "Harboøre", and then sail direct across the pond.

Will try to be there anyway, to area looks great

Rene
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Old 09 December 2005, 14:42   #46
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Scotland sounds good to me. Can we make it end of may/begining of june cos its our lass's birthday and she'll think im taking her away!!!

I think it would be great to have a mass get together, for me something like Thurs thru till monday. Living on the costa del mansfield it takes me 5.25 hrs of driving to get to bellshill, glasgow with the truck so we aint gonna be far out now iv got TD5 power.

I just need to know in plenty of time so our transport manager dont get snotty

Martin
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Old 09 December 2005, 16:00   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene
Bogi - Your are welcome to give me a shout, the boat is in storage, but we could have a small get together

On the other hand I could "just" launch in "Harboøre", and then sail direct across the pond.

Will try to be there anyway, to area looks great

Rene
I will be in Vejle and Egebjerg (Holbæk) Wednesday and Thursday, Friday in Copenhagen will PM you further details.

Rene cruise the little pond and show them how we Scandinavians traveled in early days and how to travel in style...........

Bogi
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Old 09 December 2005, 18:42   #48
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IF Gavin is up for it I would Go..... we proably would tow to Belfast , and cross by sea ... what Do you think Gavin ????
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Old 09 December 2005, 19:04   #49
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If you want to do South Wales I can help out as much as possible locally - 2 marinas on the haven so there shouldn't be too much berthing issues, plus a fair few free use slipways.
Accomodation is ok locally, both camping, B&B's, hotels etc... (the hotels aren't 5 star I don't think tho).

Only snag down here is weather which would work either to some peoples benefit (ie lots of fun) or others annoyance - get a good SW come in, and the wavelets in the solent will look like ripples

If the tides are right, and nice and high, it is possible to get up river as far as navigable to a couple of pubs in the evening. Even if really rough outside, there is still a good few miles of river to burn off some fuel on.

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Old 12 December 2005, 17:59   #50
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Nice calm water off Kip

Here, taken from my window at Toward Point (across Clyde from Kip), Isle of Bute in the foreground with Arran beyond. Know some great spots as this is quite lterally my backyard!

Whatever happened to tough hairy arsed ribbers then? Whats wrong with tents? A great camping spot with plenty safe mooring/anchoring at the Burnt Islands at the top of The Kyles of Bute.

Regards
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Old 12 December 2005, 18:52   #51
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Considering most Ribbers on here come from the south I would have thought SW Wales makes more sense.

Fuel is cheaper than Scotland for a start!!!

The Milford/Pembroke/Tenby area is great and very much geared up for tourists - loads of B+Bs - caravan parks and nice hotels.

There are some good slips to be had into the river and many pubs have their own pontoons etc.

Milford is considered to be one of the finest natural harbours in the World - the river is the deepest in Europe - and NO speed limits in most areas!!!

http://recreation.mhpa.co.uk/marinas.htm

Of course you can also venture out to sea - through the infamous Bitches and around Ramsay Island - a school of 2000 dolphins were spotted last year along with 6 fin whales.

Nothing against the West Coast of Scotland - probably the finest ribbing area in the world but really needs a 2 week holiday to do it justice!!!
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Old 12 December 2005, 19:13   #52
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Dont forget a visit to the loch fyne if in the clyde area. here is some pics.
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Old 12 December 2005, 19:26   #53
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Hate kippers though!!! And Haggis - never managed to catch either!!!
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Old 12 December 2005, 19:45   #54
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South wales is an interesting venue, especially around the Mumbles area. That would get my vote - lots to do in Swansea area, great pubs, bars and restaurants.
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Old 12 December 2005, 20:09   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
Hate kippers though!!! And Haggis - never managed to catch either!!!
Well, I did a bit of googling on your behalf, seeing as in the past you always helped me out, and hopefully this light hearted piece should aid you in catching a haggis!

A haggis is a small animal native to Scotland. Well when I say animal, actually it's a bird with vestigial wings - like the ostrich. Because the habitat of the haggis in exclusively mountainous, and because it is always found on the sides of Scottish mountains, it has evolved a rather strange gait. The poor thing has only three legs, and each leg is a different length - the result of this is that when hunting haggis, you must get them on to a flat plain - then they are very easy to catch - they can only run round in circles.

After catching your haggis, and dispatching it in time honoured fashion, it is cooked in boiling water for a period of time, then served with tatties and neeps (and before you ask, that's potatoes and turnips).

The haggis is considered a great delicacy in Scotland, and as many of your compatriots will tell you, it tastes great - many visitors from the US have been known to ask for second helpings of haggis!

The noise haggis make during the mating season gave rise to that other great Scottish invention, the bagpipes.

Many other countries have tried to establish breeding colonies of haggis, but to no avail - it's something about the air and water in Scotland, which once the haggis is removed from that environment, they just pine away.

A little known fact about the haggis is its aquatic ability - you would think that with three legs of differing lengths, the poor wee beastie wouldn't be very good at swimming, but as some of the Scottish hillsides have rather spectacular lakes on them, over the years, the haggis has learned to swim very well. When in water, it uses its vestigial wings to propel itself forward, and this it can do at a very reasonable speed.

Haggis are by nature very playful creatures, and when swimming, very often swim in a group - a bit like ducks - where the mother will swim ahead, and the youngsters follow in a line abreast. This is a very interesting phenomenon to watch, as it looks something like this :



__---

/ /

/ /

/-\ /-\ /-\ /-\ / /


The long neck of the mother keeping a watchful eye for predators.

This does however confuse some people, who, not knowing about the haggis, can confuse it with the other great indigenous Scottish inhabitant, the Loch Ness Monster, or Nessie as she's affectionately known, who looks more like this :



__---

/ /

/ /

\\ /-\ /-\ /-\ /-\ / /


From a distance, I'm sure you'll agree, the tourist can easily mistake a family of haggis out for their daily swim, as Nessie, this of course gives rise to many more false sightings, but is inherently very good for the tourist industry in Scotland.

The largest known recorded haggis (caught in 1893 by a crofter at the base of Ben Lomond), weighed 25 tons.

In the water, haggis have been known to reach speeds of up to 35 knots, and therfore coupled with their amazing agility in this environment, are extremely difficult to catch, however, if the hunter can predict where the haggis will land, a good tip is to wait in hiding on the shore, beacuse when they come out of the water, they will inevitably run round in circles to dry themselves off.

This process, especially with the larger haggis, gives rise to another phenomenon - circular indentations in the ground, and again, these have been mistaken by tourists as the landing sites of UFOs.

I hope this clears up some of the misconceptions about the Haggis, that rare and very beautiful beastie of the Scottish Highlands (and very tasty too).

I have included here as much factual material as possible, although there are many gaps in this subject, and some of the information has to be mere speculation.

No-one has as yet been able to ascertain the sex of captured Haggis, and partially because of this, scientists assume the haggis is hermophroditic.

This may also be a product of evolution, and does explain the logistic problems of bringing two haggis together - after all, sure footed though the beast is, if two were to mate on a Scottish hillside, it is a long fall down, and a slip at the wrong time may very well result in a reduction by two of the total haggis population.

What is known about Haggis breeding is that, several days prior to giving birth, the Haggis make a droning sound - very much like a beginner playing the bagpipes for the first time - giving rise to the speculation that the bagpipes were indeed invented in Scotland, simply to lure unsuspecting haggis into a trap. At the onset of this noise, all other wildlife for a five mile radius can be seen exiting the area at an extremely high rate of knots (wouldn't you if your neighbour had just started to play the bagpipes?). The second purpose of the noise seems to be to attract other Haggis to the scene, in order to lend help with the birth. This also gives rise to the assumption that Haggis are tone deaf.

Haggis normally give birth to two or more young Haggis, or "wee yins", as they are called in Scotland, and from birth, their eyes are open, and they are immediately able to run around in circles, just like their parent.

The wee yins are fiercely independant, and it is only a matter of weeks before they leave the parent, and go off foraging for food on their own, although it is perhaps a two or three year period before they are themselves mature enough to give birth.

Most Haggis hunters will leave the wee yins, due simply to their size, but when attacked by other predators, they are still able to emit the bagpipe like sound, which again has the effect of very quickly clearing the surrounding area of all predators, and attracting other Haggis to the scene. This results in a very low infant mortality rate, with most wee yins actually making it to adulthood.

The lifespan of the Haggis is again an unknown quantity, but from taggings done in the Victorian era, we know that some haggis live for well over 100 years.

Information provided by john@wilsonjo.demon.co.uk
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Old 12 December 2005, 20:10   #56
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South Wales gets my vote - Codders can organise and host it.

I bet you will get the highest turn out ever - purely out of people wanting to meet the elusive man himself...

I for one will definitely be attending if it is there...
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Old 12 December 2005, 20:12   #57
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Have to say we like the sound of S. Wales also. (Happy memories for us of a special holiday there ).

Would love to go to Tenby, and the Mumbles is beautiful. I remember Paul windsurfing in Barry in a gale

Sorry Andre, can't decide! S. Wales is a bit nearer for us but will go along with the majority vote.

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Old 12 December 2005, 20:50   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Jackeens

Sorry Andre, can't decide! S. Wales is a bit nearer for us but will go along with the majority vote.

missus
I have nothing against SW and agree that much closer then Inverkip for us from the South Coast and also like the idea. Have done ribbing in Scotland but not in SW

Would any Irish and Scottish members travel to SW?
Not forgetting Danish , that right Rene

The decision is with the majority

What is it to be?
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Old 12 December 2005, 22:03   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo
Well, I did a bit of googling on your behalf,.... The poor thing has only three legs, and each leg is a different length ...
This is not correct. The haggis has four legs but two on one side of its body are shorter than the two on the other. Most haggis are right handed in that they can only move along a hill in one direction so they need at least two entrances to their burrows, or rather, an exit and an entrance. However, there is a subspecies which is left handed and these obviously have the shorter legs on the other side of their body. They are sought after because they are said to taste better. I trust this clarifies the situation.
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Old 12 December 2005, 22:45   #60
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technical question

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalker
The haggis has four legs but two on one side of its body are shorter than the two on the other.
But are they counter-rotating??
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