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Old 03 June 2009, 17:14   #21
RJH
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We launched our 2.3m sib from the boat and rowed to the beach for the first time on Sunday. Bit of an experiment to see how easy / difficult it would be and have to say all went well. Inflated, launched, rowed ashore, had lunch and then did it all in reverse. Have to say conditions were ideal though.
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Old 03 June 2009, 17:53   #22
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Country: UK - Channel Islands
Town: Jersey
Boat name: Archangel
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 6m +
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Using a dinghy with a RIB

Here in the Channel Islands using a dinghy is common place. I always keep mine on board and inflate it when I arrive. I would certainly invest in a small outboard as rowing more than 50 yards is tiring and nigh-on impossible against a strong tide. I remember a few years ago having to row from a mooring buoy at the end of the breakwater to the harbour in Alderney - God, never again. I bought a 2.2hp Honda as soon as I returned to Jersey. As for anchoring, I don't trust it myself. I hate leaving my boat anchored up and never let it out of my sight when forced to do so.


Ever thought of trying origami? Have a look at my Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gj0kyz
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Old 03 June 2009, 18:35   #23
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Country: UK - England
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Around the Scillies you often need to take your tender. I came up with the solution of having a line from the bow D ring that you atatch the achour to to a cleat on the side of my console. Tie it down tight and I can run at almost 30 knts with no probs (and I have flip up wheels on the tender). Just one option.

Ian
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Old 03 June 2009, 18:49   #24
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I think the Atlantic 85's can take an X-boat. Might be worth asking M Chappelow if he knows how they are fastened down?
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Old 04 June 2009, 02:31   #25
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Make: Ribeye
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Ribeye 650 + Quicksilver 270 Tender

Neilda,

With the same boat as yours we use the SIB/tender to get into beaches or to go up creeks or just for the kids to 'play' in or just use a swimming platfom when at anchor. Having watched quite a few boats try to go in close and end up going broadside. getting swamped, picnic going for a swim etc, I thinks it's unnecessary risky to do this in all but the calmest of days and wouldn't generally recommend it.

The tender in its valise fits nicely either to the right of the console or even better in between the console and the forward 'sunpad' where it acts as useful backrest for 2 kids on the sunpad bowrider-style. Inflated with a bravo electric pump, it only takes about 5 mins to get the thing inflated/rigged (all done forward of the console) and then gets lifted over the side. I also have a 5 hp outboard for it (which stows easily in the aft under-seat locker) which is brilliant for longer runs and not too difficult to rig (I always tie the o/b to the rib before lifting over the side to put it on the transom of the SIB!).

The other good thing about this combination is that I can fit the SIB (but not with the o/b fitted!) upside down in front of the console with the transom resting on the console seat 'arms' and the SIB bow exactly where the RIB fairlead and cleat are. Securing it is easy here (I get the kids to go underneath and secure it at the bow. Another rope from the one of the RIB's tube-mounted handrail ropes over the top and tied of to the other handrail rope secures it well enough for the configuration to be driven totally normally at all speeds up to 30 kts (I've just not needed to do more than that, but I'm sure it would be fine). On one journey of about 15 miles like this the kids went underneath the SIB and read their books in the shelter. It probably looks a bit odd, but it's the only way I'm ever going to afford a RIB with a cabin!!!! On getting to the destination there's two ropes to release, lift the boat into the water and that's it!


Been watching the evloution of your new purchase with interest - feel free to PM, we're Solent area ribsters too!
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Old 04 June 2009, 03:15   #26
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Pup,

That's an interesting solution.

I don't think I would ever get into having a tender with a motor - but I am nervous about getting close to a beach. In perfect flat harbour conditions I can slow manoeuvre like a pro, but I can just imagine a Mr Bean moment heading my way and being the laughing stock of a beach crowd as I fumble around trying to land my now embarrassed family!!

Much of this is technique and confidence. None of which I have. But as I'm quite happy driving ridiculously wide sports cars down narrow lanes, I'm sure I can master a RIB. Famous last words!

Despite this cocky attitude the phrase "the sea's a cruel mistress" is echoing in my mind!!

I'm out and about today as it happens with a couple of mates - going over to the Folly for lunch.... The beaches are safe, for the moment.....

Having read and re-read - this solution from Steve seems the most logical technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 250kts View Post
Neil

Agree with all before.

From experience we have used the following technique. If the wind is blowing onshore, drive the boat until the depth is such that you need to raise the engine, at the point turn the boat into wind and lower the anchor. Once it bites, kill the engine and raise then ease out the anchor line. The boat will drift towards the beach with the nose into any waves, until you can literally walk off the stern, into inches of water. Secure the line and enjoy the beach. If on a falling tide, once the family are off, pull the line in until at a safe depth, secure and leave the boat.

Reverse the process when you want to leave.

If the wind is not onshore you can still do it, but must use the engine to reverse towards the beach and have a second small anchor attached to the stern to keep the boat pointing into any surf.

Steve
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Old 04 June 2009, 06:01   #27
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Thats what I said, veer in. Just make sure you know what the tide is doing.
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