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Old 19 January 2010, 11:29   #11
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Interesting thread! Do you have videos from it S.?

I saw on youtube some videos of the RNLI who turned a sib... i think its more difficult to turn a rib back...
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Old 19 January 2010, 11:56   #12
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If I remember right, there's a thread somewhere on here where it was discussed at length.
I think in the end most experienced members agreed that righting an up turned RIB like you would a dinghy/SIB was near impossible.

Myself I couldn't comment as I've never tried it. I did it many years ago with a dinghy with out much fuss.
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Old 19 January 2010, 12:52   #13
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Interesting thread! Do you have videos from it S.?

I saw on youtube some videos of the RNLI who turned a sib... i think its more difficult to turn a rib back...
unfortunately nope it was about 9-10 years ago, but it was a 5.7 metre sea rider, with. 70 or 90 HP dead engine on back.

They took anybody With drysuit out to try it of the pontoons at port Edgar. They said it was there last outing due to h & s.

Do very similar the way the Rnli do there small boats, I don't know if the RNLI deflate one of the tubes at back first. When I saw the mod police do it was thinking clever the way the lowered the pivot point by deflating tubes so boat no longer is sitting level on water, hence aiding the righting.

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Old 19 January 2010, 13:26   #14
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I guess it was a 5.4 or a 6m Searider... Avon never made 5.7 seariders. Its a clever idea to deflate the tubes! Is there anyone with an SR5.4 who wants to try this :P ??
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Old 19 January 2010, 20:14   #15
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Interesting thread! Do you have videos from it S.?
There's a little clip here: http://www.ccga12.org/rhiot/ about halfway down the page.

I have a similar self-righting rig on my Hurricane. I have had this very discussion (could I start the boat etc post-capsize) with a couple of the local Coasties. They made the point that regardless of what was lost, or regardless of whether you can get underway or not, you are always going to be better off in an upright, swamped boat, than you are in the water, beside a flipped boat. Especially considering that our water is about 2C in April, and stays really cold until august before it starts cooling off again.

There are two big risks when using this sort of system: One is that the crew might get clobbered by the boat coming over, and secondly, when the boat starts to rise up before flipping, it will act like a sail (presumably it's howling out if you managed to flip the thing in the first place...) and unless the cres is tethered to the boat, it might very well drift away...

I'm happy to say that I have never had to use my self-righting gear!
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Old 20 January 2010, 01:21   #16
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There are two big risks when using this sort of system: One is that the crew might get clobbered by the boat coming over, and secondly, when the boat starts to rise up before flipping, it will act like a sail (presumably it's howling out if you managed to flip the thing in the first place...) and unless the cres is tethered to the boat, it might very well drift away...

I'm happy to say that I have never had to use my self-righting gear!
You have have a sea anchor fitted in the bow.
The righting system should be manually operated from the stern, this lets the crew deploy the sea anchor make their way to the stern and then activate the righting system.

D-class/ILB1 crews can right their boats without letting the tubes down.
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