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Old 31 August 2008, 16:28   #21
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It does not look like the glue has come apart at the front you can see from the bbc footage that it actually tore free at the front which then caused the bow to peel back.

I can't believe how little meat there is at the front for the tube to attach to. I remember Rogue Wave telling me this was a weak spot with Ribcraft now I can see why
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Old 01 September 2008, 13:13   #22
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Originally Posted by wavelength View Post

or a Humber for that matter?
No the tubes just fall to bits at the other end instead
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Old 01 September 2008, 13:40   #23
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Given the number of humbers knocking about around the world, and the age of a lot of them, used and abused by various dive clubs and commercial operators, they do not seem to figure in the "tube ripping off from the bow due to stuffing into a wave" scenarios, or indeed any detubing situations. I've used them of all ages and all sizes, all over the world, including the Falklands and I have never had a prob with tubes coming unstuck from the front, back or indeed the middle .
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Old 01 September 2008, 14:42   #24
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Given the number of humbers knocking about around the world, and the age of a lot of them, used and abused by various dive clubs and commercial operators, they do not seem to figure in the "tube ripping off from the bow due to stuffing into a wave" scenarios, or indeed any detubing situations. I've used them of all ages and all sizes, all over the world, including the Falklands and I have never had a prob with tubes coming unstuck from the front, back or indeed the middle .
Phew! That's a relief. Thought for a while I'd got something else to worry about. Now I can concentrate on thinking that my engine block might be turning into a colander.
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Old 01 September 2008, 16:11   #25
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Phew! That's a relief. Thought for a while I'd got something else to worry about. Now I can concentrate on thinking that my engine block might be turning into a colander.
I hope not-we still have one of our humbers from 2001 with that same model engine! The boat has been as good as gold but it had three engines in the first year due to problems. Keep it in regular use -the best combined maintainance plan for both the outboard and its owner
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Old 01 September 2008, 16:21   #26
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There was one incident when a tube ripped off a Humber all on one side that I can remember. It was a few years ago in the Clyde on a RIB used by a diving club that shall remain nameless to protect the guilty. The boat lost one whole sides worth of Tube from the bow right back.
I think it may have been caused ever so slightly by abuse though, probably hitting the channel bouy in the dark at 25-30 knts may just have been a contributing factor
This thread is really giving me a nice warm glow despite my concern for the folk involved in the various incidents, I very near bought a Ribcraft instead of the Humber, mainly because it was supposed to be of a higher build quality. I hadn't realised it wasn't unknown for them to self destruct!
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Old 02 September 2008, 03:31   #27
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I hadn't realised it wasn't unknown for them to self destruct!
Shoking isn't it, well the only solution then is that ribs have a fibreglass nose cone to help keep the tubes on

It may be possible to retro-fit so feel free to chat to Leeway as I gave him a GRP nose cone moulding.


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Old 02 September 2008, 05:49   #28
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they do not seem to figure in the "tube ripping off from the bow due to stuffing into a wave" scenarios, or indeed any detubing situations.
IMHO it depends how badly they have been used and in what conditions, every craft has a weak point, just that some people have more luck in finding it The forces involved must be very high, try and push an inflated football underwater then imagine 20+ times the boyancy hitting a wall of water at 20 knotts, the pressure on the front bow of the tubes would surely be very high.
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Old 02 September 2008, 07:21   #29
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IMHO it depends how badly they have been used and in what conditions, every craft has a weak point, just that some people have more luck in finding it The forces involved must be very high, try and push an inflated football underwater then imagine 20+ times the boyancy hitting a wall of water at 20 knotts, the pressure on the front bow of the tubes would surely be very high.
but isnt that what a tough rib is supposed to or should be capable of doing! done it a couple of times by accident and watched the tube take the strain but it held beautifully - like it should!
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Old 02 September 2008, 09:55   #30
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I while I can easily see how this can happen to a RIB when being used commercially as a lifeboat (going full throttle into very heavy seas day after day), it is completely unacceptable that it does happen. If a manufacturer is going to build a RIB, they should do it right. People choose RIBs because of their supposed ability to handle conditions that a hard boat can't.

Codprawn asked a good question about whether anyone has heard of this happening on an Avon. I haven't heard of this happening to a Hurricane, Polaris or a Titan Rib. All of which get continuous use as CG and Rescue boats in extremely severe sea conditions in North America. Sure they all may eventually may need retubing after alot of heavy use, but a a catastrophic separation of the tubes at the bow from a hard stuffing?

For a brand such as Ribcraft (which I thought was supposed to be a premier British brand) to have this happen even once, let alone several times (based on all the other accounts I've read of in this thread) is absolutely brutal. They clearly need to redesign, and re-evaluate their construction methods.

Have RIBs become a victim of their own success in the UK? By that I mean, has their popularity drawn so many outfits to get into the manufacturing of Ribs, that alot of them really don't know (or care) about how to build it properly? It seems that RIB evaluations in magazines (particularly that one dedicated to RIBs with the beautiful glossy photos and the very poorly written articles), always talk about the dryness of the ride, lay out of the deck, whether the cupholders are ergonomically located etc..., but I never see anything written about what really matters, which is long term durablity after continuous severe use.

What advantage does a RIB that falls apart and sinks when used in severe conditions have over a hardboat that gets swamped and sinks when used in severe conditions? May as well save the money and get the hardboat, or better still, eliminate the middle man and just have someone throw you overboard while you are a passenger on a boat that does float.
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