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Old 03 September 2014, 12:52   #11
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I'd reinforce the idea of solid foam for children of that age - providing you can get the right size - there's a max weight for most of them & doesn't always relate to the age range quoted so that is worth checking.

My two now 10 & 11 moved onto auto-jackets last year.

Some of it may depend on your boating, if you spend much of your time pootling around in rivers at low speed one could argue that the need for an auto is less. Others amy disagree

As others have said crotch straps essential for any LJ child or adult
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Old 03 September 2014, 20:50   #12
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Johnny,
Definitely Auto. If someone hits the water at high speed they're going to be dazed if not unconscious so unable to pull an inflation cord.
Follow RNLI link advice as regards buoyancy, more is always better (but might be un-necessary depending on the conditions you go out in) provided the jacket can still be made to fit the wearer snugly.
For the kids, I don't have an issue with them wearing auto-gas (mine do) - it is very unusual for them to fail to inflate. The foam ones do however keep them warmer and are cheaper if they're growing fast. Please don't however confuse a foam bouyancy aid for a life-jacket.
All jackets should have crotch-straps fitted and always be fitted properly & snugly.
I'd recommend considering also the following:-
  • Carrying one spare lifejacket
  • Carry a spare killcord incase the helmsman goes overboard.
  • Assuming you're typically at the helm, consider how your family would recover you if you went overboard.
  • Make sure the family all know what to do in an MOB situation. Practice with a fender / bucket, but never with a person, other than stationary and moored, to practice getting someone back on board.

don't mean to make this sound over-dramatic but a bit of preparation can prevent a simple slip developing into a proper disaster.
Happy boating.
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Old 04 September 2014, 02:45   #13
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Originally Posted by Jon Tallis View Post
Johnny,

Definitely Auto. If someone hits the water at high speed they're going to be dazed if not unconscious so unable to pull an inflation cord.

Follow RNLI link advice as regards buoyancy, more is always better (but might be un-necessary depending on the conditions you go out in) provided the jacket can still be made to fit the wearer snugly.

For the kids, I don't have an issue with them wearing auto-gas (mine do) - it is very unusual for them to fail to inflate. The foam ones do however keep them warmer and are cheaper if they're growing fast. Please don't however confuse a foam bouyancy aid for a life-jacket.

All jackets should have crotch-straps fitted and always be fitted properly & snugly.

I'd recommend considering also the following:-
  • Carrying one spare lifejacket
  • Carry a spare killcord incase the helmsman goes overboard.
  • Assuming you're typically at the helm, consider how your family would recover you if you went overboard.
  • Make sure the family all know what to do in an MOB situation. Practice with a fender / bucket, but never with a person, other than stationary and moored, to practice getting someone back on board.



don't mean to make this sound over-dramatic but a bit of preparation can prevent a simple slip developing into a proper disaster.

Happy boating.

Hi John,

Thanks for the comprehensive advice I will go full harness/leg strap automatic, probably for my eldest daughter too, but keep the little one in foam for a while longer. Good advice on the kill cord, I'll make sure I carry two at all times and agree it would be good to practise MOB procedures with a bouy. As you say preparing well can prevent a simple accident, especially at speed.

Thanks everyone for their time in responding I think I'm sorted.
Cheers

Johnny
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Old 04 September 2014, 02:50   #14
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I'm new to ribbing and wondered if there was any advice on the type of lifejacket for rib cruising? Automatic, self inflating it's a minefield. Also what best for children aged 6 and 8?? Any thoughts much appreciated.
Any recommendations??
Welcome to rib.net - beware the question that generates 20 answers none of which answer your question just tell you what they do for their boating.

So I'm not going to answer just ask more questions:

What risks have you identified? And other than life jackets what have you done to control those risks?

What do you mean by rib cruising? What is your cruising ground? What is your worst cruising conditions you'd plan to be out in? How sure are you conditions wouldn't deteriorate?

What gear are you wearing? Shorts & t shirt, wet suit, oilskins dry suit?

If you go for a swim who can rescue you?

Do u cruise alone?

What distress alerting kit do you carry?

What do you do alongside cruising... Ringos , skiing etc? Swimming? Launch procedure or marina?

Probability of night rescue or fog rescue?
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Old 04 September 2014, 04:24   #15
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Welcome to rib.net - beware the question that generates 20 answers none of which answer your question just tell you what they do for their boating.
Or beware the question that even though it has been answered comprehensively by several people all agreeing (auto for you, foam buoyancy for the kids) still generates 20 questions from someone else!
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Old 04 September 2014, 06:33   #16
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Or beware the question that even though it has been answered comprehensively by several people all agreeing (auto for you, foam buoyancy for the kids) still generates 20 questions from someone else!
+ 1
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Old 06 September 2014, 08:40   #17
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Or beware the question that even though it has been answered comprehensively by several people all agreeing (auto for you, foam buoyancy for the kids) still generates 20 questions from someone else!
It was only 15 :-p

Completely agree 'auto for you' but there could be other acceptable answers. But then the hanmar vs normal auto question arises and the 150 vs 275N. Not sure all that was written about 275 was true. Well fitted to a light weight person I can't see why it would rise up. But I also suspect that in a family cruising situation a 275 should never be necessary, but if he is thinking of boating alone in wilder places it might have a role.

Also agree 'foam for kids'. But the OP has taken the decision to get his 8 year old an auto... ...presumably based on what was posted here. 99% of the time that'll be fine. The 1% it fails to auto I hope she remembers and has the strength to tug the handle. Only ever tugged one once and it was old and possibly crusty but it took a big pull. I wasn't wearing it at the time... May be easier worn. When the army capsized a boat with kids on a few years ago there were issues with lifejackets being switched to manual (not a choice on most consumer LJs) and people not remembering to pull the handle in the chaos. Of course my child is a child genius so he would remember... ...wouldn't he?

willk made a good point the other day about visitor LJs and people giving the scruffy one to the guest. There is something to be said for the person in charge taking the last effective device, but also bear in mind those not in charge could be rescued by the person in charge the reverse may not apply. But actually provided they notice I've gone over, pressing the Red Button on my already kill cord stopped boat would probably be enough. And me wearing a less able life jacket might mean I take less chances...
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Old 09 September 2014, 00:27   #18
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It was only 15 :-p

Completely agree 'auto for you' but there could be other acceptable answers. But then the hanmar vs normal auto question arises and the 150 vs 275N. Not sure all that was written about 275 was true. Well fitted to a light weight person I can't see why it would rise up. But I also suspect that in a family cruising situation a 275 should never be necessary, but if he is thinking of boating alone in wilder places it might have a role.

Also agree 'foam for kids'. But the OP has taken the decision to get his 8 year old an auto... ...presumably based on what was posted here. 99% of the time that'll be fine. The 1% it fails to auto I hope she remembers and has the strength to tug the handle. Only ever tugged one once and it was old and possibly crusty but it took a big pull. I wasn't wearing it at the time... May be easier worn. When the army capsized a boat with kids on a few years ago there were issues with lifejackets being switched to manual (not a choice on most consumer LJs) and people not remembering to pull the handle in the chaos. Of course my child is a child genius so he would remember... ...wouldn't he?

willk made a good point the other day about visitor LJs and people giving the scruffy one to the guest. There is something to be said for the person in charge taking the last effective device, but also bear in mind those not in charge could be rescued by the person in charge the reverse may not apply. But actually provided they notice I've gone over, pressing the Red Button on my already kill cord stopped boat would probably be enough. And me wearing a less able life jacket might mean I take less chances...

More good points and agree that foam is probably best for the kids as they are fool proof and will also provide insulation to a certain extent. I'm looking for a set of 4/6auto life jackets which will be useful for guests and spares on board.
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Old 09 September 2014, 01:54   #19
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Any thoughts on harness or no harness with life jackets?? Thanks
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Old 09 September 2014, 02:20   #20
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Any thoughts on harness or no harness with life jackets?? Thanks
If you mean a tether to the boat, then no. I wear an auto lifejacket, obligatory crotch strap over a 2-piece offshore waterproof suit. I normally helm so I'm wearing the kill cord too. Last thing I'd want - would be to be connected to the boat if I fell out.

Different story for those that are on yachts miles from anywhere, and possibly taking turns in rough weather. This is a useful link, sobering reading, for the dangers of using them.

How your harness could kill you | Yachting World
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