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Old 16 November 2015, 09:08   #11
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That looks like a great solution. Thanks for pictures - makes it easy to see just how neat this is. I like the idea of it being able to be dismantled. There are some good fabricators around here that I'm sure could do a good job of making something similar. What I might to is look at having a shoe type plate fixed across both A Frame uprights so that the ladder can then simply slot in. Well noted re your comment on the A Frame handle being a 'must' - I can see why. Does the ladder simply rest across the top of the tube and is that what stops it going under the boat?
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Old 16 November 2015, 09:26   #12
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Originally Posted by po2watch View Post
That looks like a great solution. Thanks for pictures - makes it easy to see just how neat this is. I like the idea of it being able to be dismantled. There are some good fabricators around here that I'm sure could do a good job of making something similar. What I might to is look at having a shoe type plate fixed across both A Frame uprights so that the ladder can then simply slot in. Well noted re your comment on the A Frame handle being a 'must' - I can see why. Does the ladder simply rest across the top of the tube and is that what stops it going under the boat?
the ladder upright presses onto the rubbing strake much stronger there, it does give a slight indentation of the strake but you can overcome that by having a spreader plate but mine hasn't been a problem make sure the ladder is long enough so you just swim up and put your feet on the bottom rungs without having to climb much easier in a swell then its a straight climb.
you could design it so as it locks before it touches the tube possibilities are endless it just gets more expensive the more complicated.

cheers
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Old 30 November 2015, 07:40   #13
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Originally Posted by Wightdiver View Post
We used to have a large buoy with a 4 inch stainless ring attached. Run the shot line through the ring, attach it firmly to the back of the boat and then gun it. As the buoy move away from the boat the it drags the shot upwards, you then need to quickly pull in the slack before the shot sinks again. I think our shot was only around 25kg.

We did have some success with an arrangement of 4 carabineers just above the shot with the mouths all facing different directions, the 4 inch ring would get caught in one and the shot would float, sometimes!!

Andy
A friend of mine uses a climbers "ascender" instead of the ring or carabiner. That way the shot line only goes one way and you don't need to pull in so quick.

Phil M
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Old 30 November 2015, 09:57   #14
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RIBase
It would be possible to fit a battery or small petrol winch onto the consolidation or some where up front where there is space, run the line over a roller on the nose and it'll run nicely.

A Google search brings up various options.
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Old 30 November 2015, 10:35   #15
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Re The Ladder
How about one of those with a just central vertical spine and horizontal bars going out to each side.
I have found these much easier to mount especially with fins on.
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Old 30 November 2015, 11:23   #16
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Originally Posted by Wightdiver View Post
We used to have a large buoy with a 4 inch stainless ring attached. Run the shot line through the ring, attach it firmly to the back of the boat and then gun it. As the buoy move away from the boat the it drags the shot upwards, you then need to quickly pull in the slack before the shot sinks again. I think our shot was only around 25kg.
I use a similar method for crab trap retrieval. A 12" or 14" (don't remember) Polyform ball buoy with a 6" ring goes on the trap line, then motor off about 45 degrees away from the trap direction (i.e. if the trap buoy is hanging due south, you head towards the traps, but 45 degrees off, so either a 045 or 315 heading.) The drag of water on the buoy will suck the buoy under, which will raise the trap (it does put a lot of stress on my wire traps, though; they're only like $29 though, so are replaceable to some degree.)

You can get a better explanation by searching "ball buoy anchor recovery" or similar.

jky
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Old 30 November 2015, 15:36   #17
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Here most of the scuba diving I do is shallow (<40m) so we just use a nice light shot weight about 10-15kg, but shaped like a large fishing weight so it sinks quickly and tied to some fairly thin rope so not too much tidal drag if shotting before slack. Never missed a target yet. Simply move it down tide of the wreck / obstructions when you hit seabed. The method for lifting heavy items off the seabed, alderney ring if you don't want to get wet or lift bag if using divers. Alderney ring works well with plain rope and a clogger as suggested or a short length of rubbish chain at the end of the rope, the chain links catch on the alderney ring and tend to stop the weight slipping back through in my experience.
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