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Old 01 January 2015, 17:35   #11
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Buy a one piece and buy the best you can afford. Mullion have a good name. Fladen are cheap but leak on a rainy day and in driven spray. I know - I have one. Wear layers under it and avoid cotton (jeans, etc.) If you get wet, hiking fabrics are the best underclothes.
I have a Mullion1 piece breathable flotation suit & a diving membrane drysuit, most of the time I opt for the drysuit. It's starting to show its age & I'll replace it this year with a surface drysuit, probably a Typhoon. The type of ribbing you do will have a bearing on your choice. If you keep the boat afloat or drystack & never have to get wet, then a flotation will do. If, like us you trail your boat, you will invariably find yourself in the water at some point, either launching, recovering or wading ashore, you'll be glad you spent the extra dosh on a drysuit, trust me.
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Old 01 January 2015, 17:38   #12
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I've got an ntech floatation suit and is fine for keeping you warm but does leak. I used it on a cruise to France little over a year ago. Got completely soaked but kept me warm. Very uncomfortable sitting in wet clothes though and will be investing in a floatation suit with boots and neoprene coller and cuffs in the future.
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Old 01 January 2015, 17:53   #13
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Originally Posted by Disschord View Post
Hi I am looking for my first floatation suit.

Does anyone have any buying advice or recommendations ?

Hi

I have a 'Penn Waveblaster' flotation suit which ive used for a couple of winter's and been toasty warm and dry. Its a little restrictive for movement due to it being a quality piece of kit, if you want thinner material then you will be cold and wet.
Ok its not a drysuit but it is certainly fit for purpose.

I would suggest you try before you buy. Whatever you choose based on requirements and budget try it on in store.

Be safe
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Old 02 January 2015, 04:46   #14
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Drysuit always. But if you buy a surface Drysuit the first thing to do is get the stupid latex socks cut off and get wellies attached the same as diving dry suits ,latex socks are crap,and so easy to puncture ,and they are always s too big ,one size fits all!!!, like wearing a bin bag


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Old 02 January 2015, 04:50   #15
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If you go for a dry suit, make sure and get good thermal gear for underneath, that makes all the difference.
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Old 02 January 2015, 05:02   #16
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Originally Posted by ian parr View Post
Drysuit always. But if you buy a surface Drysuit the first thing to do is get the stupid latex socks cut off and get wellies attached the same as diving dry suits ,latex socks are crap,and so easy to puncture ,and they are always s too big ,one size fits all!!!, like wearing a bin bag


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+1 that's why I'm going for the Typhoon. Their socks are the same material as the suit. My missus has had one for 3 years now & is still like new. She wears a pair of thick socks( heat holders) & wellies.


.....sh1t happens.......
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Old 02 January 2015, 06:08   #17
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I've had and used both one and two piece Floatation suits mainly when I used to go winter Charter Boat fishing....thinking being,if you need a warm waterproof coat and leggings why not have some built in Bouyancey as well...and they worked ok.
Although I never tried one in the water,with no seals and big gaps (especially in the two piece) youd certainly have instant water ingress and feel the cold!
Considering the forum ie Ribbing,I'd agree with Kerny a decent dry suit may be a better buy,and ultimately more useful,and potentially life saving....even if a bit more expensive.
Sounds like you've made two mistakes then... 1. Getting a crap float suit - both the ones I've worn had soft "seals" on the calves etc, to limit the rate of water ingress, and having actually used in water they work both to reduce the shock of immersion and keep you relatively warm like a wetsuit. They don't keep you dry (although mind sounds more rain / spray proof than willks)
2. Assuming that everyone on ribnet uses their boat in the same way. Some people NEED suspension seat, gecko helmets, dry suits etc. I've met ribnetters who's default clothing is shorts. But of course others think nothing of flipping their rib. The only time (including *that* almost IoM trip) I've thought a dry suit would be useful, is as Pikey Dave says for *some* launch / recovery stuff but I've mostly mastered that without getting wet above the knee. Plenty of people here use a float suit (or oilies) so they can't be totally inappropriate. For "crew" I think there is even less of an argument, especially if you have a range of sizes to accommodate.

The one downside nobody has mentioned is that once full of water you are very heavy and recovery is harder. It would be worth practicing different methods in a safe area, especially if your usual crew are slightly built!
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Old 02 January 2015, 06:40   #18
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I've met ribnetters who's default clothing is shorts.
Too right! An 'off the shoulder' shortie wetsuit and flip flops cover me for 90% of my ribbing.

IMV, if you're left in the water long enough for an immersion/flotation suit to become necessary, you're in big trouble. If I go in unplanned, it has happened a couple of times, I get the hell out asap.

Keeping warm and dry without going in the drink is another story. A drysuit would be good with winter seas breaking over one's bonce, I'd imagine.
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Old 02 January 2015, 08:14   #19
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Had a Typhoon surface dry suit for four years,fantastic,I wear technical undergarments and decent wading boots,very comfortable can wear them all day
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Old 02 January 2015, 10:43   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poly View Post
Sounds like you've made two mistakes then... 1. Getting a crap float suit - both the ones I've worn had soft "seals" on the calves etc, to limit the rate of water ingress, and having actually used in water they work both to reduce the shock of immersion and keep you relatively warm like a wetsuit. They don't keep you dry (although mind sounds more rain / spray proof than willks)
2. Assuming that everyone on ribnet uses their boat in the same way. Some people NEED suspension seat, gecko helmets, dry suits etc. I've met ribnetters who's default clothing is shorts. But of course others think nothing of flipping their rib. The only time (including *that* almost IoM trip) I've thought a dry suit would be useful, is as Pikey Dave says for *some* launch / recovery stuff but I've mostly mastered that without getting wet above the knee. Plenty of people here use a float suit (or oilies) so they can't be totally inappropriate. For "crew" I think there is even less of an argument, especially if you have a range of sizes to accommodate.

The one downside nobody has mentioned is that once full of water you are very heavy and recovery is harder. It would be worth practicing different methods in a safe area, especially if your usual crew are slightly built!
Indeed it Sounds like Floatation suits may have moved on a bit, with seals ect...which can only be a good thing!
Of course the best scenario is to have plenty options with all Kit....including what you wear to suit conditions,and type/length of journey ect....this is what most of us do I'm certain.
For me it's a good thing to be ready for most circumstances...from the lazy hazy days to the more demanding stuff!
I would say however if it were an either or decision...I'd plump for the Dry suit personally as already said with the right under garments a dry suit (with th provision of a decent Lifejacket) will do everything a floatation will do....not I think the other way round.
I also note the OP is from Shetland!!Not too many flip flop days in that neck of the woods
But hey...like all things You pays Yer money and takes yer choice!
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