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Old 24 October 2010, 17:31   #11
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yes, on a rib of the size you are considering you should be able to mount an auxiliary engine without too much fuss.
If enough room is available on the transom either side of the main outboard then you may be able to mount an 'off the shelf' bracket. Failing this the option of a custom made bracket may be required.
On both our current and previous rib, custom made brackets had to be used. Both worked very well though. We had/have the auxy outboards secured with a stailess 'safety' cable (mormally used to stop the outboard falling into the oggen ) but was attached with a stainless steel padlock for when the boat was left on a berth/mooring.
depending on the size of the auxy outboard, you may need to carry a seperate fuel tank to supply it. You may find this an inconvenience hovever i see it as a small price to pay for a reasonable degree of redundancy.

To be honest, even if i had opted to buy the inboard powered diesel rib as previously mentioned, i would of still made it a priority to fit an auxiliary engine.
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Old 24 October 2010, 17:41   #12
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Mine sits next to the main engine and is a small yam 2s, which seems to work well although I don't always put it on, it all depends on where I am going. Many rib users use an aux engine and if it doesn't fit on the transom directly fit it on an ob bracket.

It just gives piece of mind.

dj
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Old 24 October 2010, 18:41   #13
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Originally Posted by davej View Post
Mine sits next to the main engine and is a small yam 2s, which seems to work well although I don't always put it on, it all depends on where I am going. Many rib users use an aux engine and if it doesn't fit on the transom directly fit it on an ob bracket.

It just gives piece of mind.

dj
I'm not sure many rib owners do use auxilliaries actually; not many here do anyway. I don't even take a tool kit to sea anymore as I have no chance of fixing the engine if it went wrong. Have you seen how complex an E-Tec is under the bonnet? You need a computer telemetry link just to change the oil from one type to another. If I'm off to MStM or there abouts I always carry a spare prop and the means to change it but that's about all.

Going back to the debate about diesels for a minute, I used to have one in my previous boat (a big Orkney). They're ok insofar as they burn less fuel than outboards but they have their own specific problems as well such as belt failures, impellor failures, corrosion, weight, general complexity (what is it with all that metal piping?) sensitivity to fuel impurities and smell (bletch). I also agree that a diesel in a 6m rib will take up alot of deck space and will make the boat a bit heavy in the stern.

I stick by what I said earlier: a Ribcraft 5.85 with a 120 four stroke will more than meet your needs, it will be easy to tow and won't break the bank as they're readily available second hand for less than 20K.
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Old 25 October 2010, 03:22   #14
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"If I'm off to MStM or there abouts"

Good choice of destination!!! but then i suppose i am biased!


Simon
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Old 25 October 2010, 03:50   #15
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Interesting stuff. RIBs of the size that I am considering are obviously designed for one engine.
Not necessarily - e.g. Willk's Redbay is in your size range but has twin outboards - and whilst less common twin can be found on most sizes of RIB. They certainly wouldn't be out of place on a 6m rib, IF you need that level of redundancy. You'll find hours of reading on the twins v's single+aux debate using the search tool.

Quote:
Do RIBs of this size have the capacity to mount an auxilliary even if you can find a place to store one?
aux brackets, storage and need for auxilliaries has been debated much in the past. Theres even just enough space to squeeze a tiny aux on my 4m boat - so there is "always a way". It will be more useful if it is sitting in place ready to deploy - but a rib transom is not usually the most gentle place for bits of metal which weren't designed to bounce around.

Whilst I believe an aux is a good idea, its not something that every rib carries. If you were cruising on the south coast then a longer than "normal" anchor and membership of SeaStart may be just as appropriate. If your longer cruises are going to be in company then it may not be necessary either - but if you are planning crossing the Irish Sea alone then I'd certainly want an aux (and a toolkit!). For a boat the size you are looking at something around 6 HP should get you back to shore eventually - bear in mind that if shore is 20 miles away this might take five or six hours to do, and longer if the wind/tide are not favourable.
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Old 25 October 2010, 04:43   #16
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I dont want to drag this thread away from its origins but i'm quite a strong advocate of auxy outboards....

True, we do use our rib to venture somewhat further afield then the average rib user but never the less, even if we stayed in the sheltered coastal waters near where we live, we would still use one.

An auxy outboard will give you more than just the option of getting back to port, it can be used to assist in various other situations.

I have lost count of how many times the inshore lifeboat gets called out simply to recover a pleasure boat that suffered engine failure. On many an occasion, i have seen pleasure craft drift into busy shipping lanes (West Brambles in the Solent) causing a real headache for commercial traffic. If they were equipped with an auxy, then at least they could have cleared themselves from the path of oncommong container ships, tankers etc...
If (god forbid) we suffer engine failure when far from the coast then i know that, even if i can't get myself back to port, at least i can put the nose into the swell and stay 'comfortable' while waiting for help to arrive.

We also use our auxy for 'quiet' navigation through canals, rivers etc....its nice sometimes to be able to hear the vildlife around you while gently meandering along at 3knts....quite theraputic actually (i must be getting old! )


'Seastart' is good, i just wish more people would use them but i appreciate its an extra cost to what can already be considered a 'costly' passtime??.

Incidentally, over here in France, if the lifeboat goes out simply to recover a driffting pleasure boater then the owner of the boat gets charged for the service (i believe its a minimum of 80 euro's). If the RNLI adopted this philosophy then maybe people would use either the likes of 'Seastart' more often or make sure they were better equipped to go to sea. (people STILL going out with no VHF or flares etc...)

Simon
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Old 25 October 2010, 05:02   #17
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Also if you are in tehe 6-ish M category & want redundancy, twins of the smaller (and I use that word in the loosest sense) Hp will usually have an emergency pull start under the hood, and will not require a battery to run, only to crank the starter.

Net result is that you could possibly compromise on the "double everything" theory as discussed in the many twin / single discussions, because in a worst case of your battery dying, you lift the lid(s), wrap the rope round the flywheel & pull. I have pull started 55 & 60 horse engines with ease.

There is a lot to look at to optimise a twin setup, but as I have said dozens of times before, when you take an aux into account, you would be surprised just how often twins are lighter.


......and welcome to Ribnet!
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Old 25 October 2010, 05:41   #18
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On the subject of aux engines, as one who does all my boating on the waters of the west of scotland I never leave without mine and has helped me on one occassion in the sound of jura to get home! if you need more convincing just check Alysra's thread last year re his 'smell' as it illustrates the need for one. It gets you to land and gives piece of mind.
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Old 25 October 2010, 06:16   #19
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Thank you all for the contributions so far, there is clearly a great deal of reading for me to do on various threads within the forum..

The single/twin debate and the opinions with regard to the need for auxilliary power is an interesting one. I would suggest that the need is just as great when close to the shore as you are by definition that much nearer big solid things! I guess a great deal depends upon which part of the coast you are enjoying.

With regard to the original question, I know that the answers are going to to skewed by brand loyalty etc, but as I see it you tend to be loyal to a brand because it is good? With the exception of the Ribcraft there have been no specific suggestions as to what might suit me. Being based in the North an obvious choice would seem to be Humber, especially now that they have embraced the leisure market a little more. Any thoughts?

Cheers
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Old 25 October 2010, 06:36   #20
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AS a Ribcraft owner I am loyal to them because of their performance and finish. But I do have three mates who all have Humbers of varying lengths and all are good boats and as they say do what it says on the tin!!

J
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