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Old 03 February 2007, 14:14   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
Or when they have no power and end up side on to the waves and capsize...
That's what a sea anchor or normal anchor is for.....
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Old 03 February 2007, 14:38   #22
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Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
I dont think its possible to carry and pay out the amount of rope that would be required for any sort of depth. If the anchour does not have the ncessary "lay on the chain" it will not work.
Furthermore, If you have a heavy amount of anchour out, it may stop the bot from Bobbing with teh waves causing very uncomfortable jerking and possible swamping.

A sea Anchour (of the right size for the boat, normally they are too small for the boat) and on the correct length of "light but strong enough line" is the ideal choice to bide you time. The length of pay out is important to be able to adjust given different sea conditions. If used incorrectly (such as Rope tightening as the boat is about to rise up steep crest can cause swamping), the sea anchour can cause swamping, if used correctly it is an excellent and light (also folds away) way of stopping drift (especially lee shore).

my 2p worth..
I agree, however even small drogues can be effective. Even a bucket on a rope can be enough to keep the bow to windward, hence reducing the wind's effect on the boat four fold. If you are being blown into trouble then every minute counts!

As an aside, with regard to anchor chain length I witnessed a large coaster anchored off Gibraltar (very deep anchorage in places) that had got stuck because it's windlass wasn't powerful enough to lift the length of suspended chain it had let out! It had to get assistance from a barge and crane!
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Old 03 February 2007, 14:44   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
biggest you can get usually does the trick - within reason!!! The largest size conventional one is great as they all fold up so small. The most important thing is to have plenty of rope - say 300' or so - otherwise they just pull out of the waves - you often have to fine tune the length depending on conditions. Remember they can also be streamed astern as a drogue.
Yep, Codders is right. They fold up real small (they open out to look like a funnel with the little end open to allow some flow thru to avoid it collapsing) Go have a look, we used a big one for a 52Ft yacht but it would work much better (bit like dragging a bucket which works too but will probably break giving you an example of the strain) The Rope used is important because here you need to guess the Jerking movement of the boat (Mass x velocity) a heavy yacht will snap a light line whilst the rib should be much less. Suffice to say that if it breaks, then it is no bloody use at all.

I have found that a Ski line is long enough and strong enough and elastic enough to increase the effective snapping strain. Again Codders is right taht 300 would be needed in Ocean but not on short Solent sea type. Ask local RNLI COX and you are likely to get it exact and true. He/ She will aslo guide you in its correct use. If you are dragging a drogue on bow and waves are breaking over it, I would believe you will need up to 1/4 of teh period of teh waves to allow tuning to avoid rope going taught whilst you are looking up roller, pay out nuf for rope to go taught just after top of surf, a bit of flex will help hugely like towing car...
Important if Bow atached that the rope is taken through lowest secure towing eye on outside of bow. If taken through gunnel height of bow, it will make having the wrong length worse by pulling bow down thus causing some swamping over bow.

I suggest practise makes perfect.
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Old 03 February 2007, 15:01   #24
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Thank you (both of you).

I'll just have to go and play with one, as it would be best to know what effect it has and if it will work before I really need it.

Tim
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Old 03 February 2007, 18:32   #25
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Yep, try it out, its very useful for fishing too etc.
Also mighty useful if sending out distess and Long and Lat.
RNLI will allow for currents so do advise if using one and distress sent.
It also buys time on lee shore.

If you need to use one in emergency and have none, any "drag" is useful.
Suggest that you use canvas boat cover, tie rope to corner (fold the corner over on itself and then Rolling Hitch with Half hitch elf locking) that will really drag, Sail is good too and Bucket but My experience is that the bucket will not take any jerking and you may need it for another purpose...
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Old 07 February 2007, 08:26   #26
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Anchor Dropping

On the subject of anchor dropping. I thought the wise action to take was always to drop your anchor if you lose power because even though you may be too deep for it to hit the bottom where you are you may eventually drift to shallower water where it will eventually stick and therby keep you from running aground and keep you in one spot so you can be found & rescued.

Is that right?
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Old 13 February 2009, 13:24   #27
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Wat to do!

I would probably send out a pan pan on the radio then do you Fraser said at the start of the post, swear a lot and kick the console ect then do all the plelimery checks ect.

I would also be carrying a two way radio where I could contact some-one on shore and ask for advice!

But all depends on the weather!!
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Old 14 February 2009, 14:37   #28
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No doubt about it, the first thing is to call a Pan Pan. What's the point of carrying a VHF if you're not going to use it for one of it's primary purposes.

I used to regularly travel between Jersey and Alderney on my own but would normally do my best to avoid anything over a F3. 35 miles between the islands and a good 10 miles from France for the whole trip doesn't instill confidence when the wind picks up. I would console myself in the knowledge that my equipment was always properly maintained.

However, you can't be complacent as on one occasion I did have engine problems. I was with my other half, and we were 3 miles off the Ecrehoes reef on a flat calm day but with the sun just setting. I didn't fancy drifitng on the tide through the reef in the dark, so called up the CG for help. They sent out the inshore lifeboat and towed us back. I'm quite certain I did the right thing. If the CG and RNLI are willing to assist, for a genuine reason I have no hesitation in asking for their help, and as it turns out, I wouldn't have been able to fix the engine problem out at sea anyway. Even the Suzuki dealer couldn't find the fault back on dry land!
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Old 14 February 2009, 15:13   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter J View Post
On the subject of anchor dropping. I thought the wise action to take was always to drop your anchor if you lose power because even though you may be too deep for it to hit the bottom where you are you may eventually drift to shallower water where it will eventually stick and therby keep you from running aground and keep you in one spot so you can be found & rescued.

Is that right?
Not sure about 'always' - but yes, I think your reasoning is sound. In the deeper water the anchor and cable will act as a drogue of sorts and may bring the boat head to wind. As you approach the lee shore it could well save the boat while you are bottom up trying to fix your engine - or being sick from the fuel fumes.

Hanging the anchor and cable over the bow won't 'pull the bow down'. It's usually stowed right up forrard anyway, and when it's in the water it won't weigh as much, so the bow may well be higher.

I would more than likely hang my anchor and cable over the bow too.
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Old 14 February 2009, 16:31   #30
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I don't what to discourage anyone from making a Pan Pan (Urgent Assistance) call, if you feel its necessary then that's fine - however..

10miles out in a force 4/5 with no engine - I would say your pretty safe in a RIB, no less safe than motoring with your engine. It's more a pain in the backside than dangerous.

Force 5 wave height is 2/2.5m which is about the same as the beam of most RIBs - so beam on capsize is unlikely. Even less likely with a drogue/anchor deployed.

I personally would do a routine call to the coastguard, let them know about the situation and that I'm attempting to repair the engine - and then take it from there. If its safe enough to wait for Sea Start then I don't think a pan pan is necessary.

My list for 10miles out in a force 4/5 with no engine
  1. Check obvious things - kill cord, volts, fuel, ropes around prop etc
  2. Deploy drogue/anchor if necessary
  3. Routine call to coastguard and apprise them of the situation
  4. More thorough diagnostics.
  5. Organise tow
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