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Old 02 February 2007, 22:10   #11
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Has anybody any experience of using a traction kite from their rib ?

We carried two of different sizes on our trip to La Turballe last summer (where we were asked to leave an empty beach by a traffic warden lifeguard. She walked about 3/4 of a mile across uninhabited sand just to tell us off )

I kept saying that we should experiment with one of them from the boat to see what kind of course, if any, we could make across the wind but we never quite got around to trying it.

I think it would be possible to launch it with two people and some industrial gloves to prevent burns while paying out the lines. You could carry a small one ( 1.5 metres ?) for use in strong winds. I proposed to fly it from the locker seat in front of the consol, with the operator wedged in behind the special handrail we had. Unless you're built like Arnie, I would think that 5-10 minutes would be as much as you could stand before it pulled your arms from their sockets.

The kite might also attract attention from other boat users ?

Anyone ever tried anything like this ?
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Old 03 February 2007, 02:56   #12
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Originally Posted by Whiteshoes View Post
it.

I think it would be possible to launch it with two people and some industrial gloves to prevent burns while paying out the lines. You could carry a small one ( 1.5 metres ?) for use in strong winds. I proposed to fly it from the locker seat in front of the consol, with the operator wedged in behind the special handrail we had. Unless you're built like Arnie, I would think that 5-10 minutes would be as much as you could stand before it pulled your arms from their sockets.

The kite might also attract attention from other boat users ?

Anyone ever tried anything like this ?
You could use what the kite surfing boys use. A pulley wheel conected to the boat. You simply wrap the connecting line between your handles around it. Takes the force instead of your hands.
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Old 03 February 2007, 03:02   #13
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I MUST fit my aux and keep it running when leaving/entering the harbour in dodgy conditions!!!

I have an idea... Why not fit an electric start and a remote operated damper so you can drop the aux and start it from the console?

How does your aux fit? On a bracket or straight to the transom?
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Old 03 February 2007, 07:10   #14
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The average depth where I was is 15 meters. Over 20 miles out and you get an average of 40 meters.
Around my home port, there are many areas where the water depth approaches 500' within a mile of shore, so anchoring sometimes isn't practical. Also, we don't have anywhere near the boat traffic that it seems like you have in the UK... but probably more than Stephen has.

On the upside, you can reach the Coast Guard from anywhere. I carry two VHFs, and a cell (which isn't much use), as well as two GPS'. I'd love to fit an aux. on my boat, but there just isn't room...

When all else fails, I'll chuck the Missus over the side with the bow line in her teeth. She does a mean dog-paddle and eventually we'd get to terra-firma!

It's funny listening to you guys, since we routinely head 20 - 30 miles out and I never gave it a second thought... until now!
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Old 03 February 2007, 07:23   #15
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Around my home port, there are many areas where the water depth approaches 500' within a mile of shore, so anchoring sometimes isn't practical. Also, we don't have anywhere near the boat traffic that it seems like you have in the UK... but probably more than Stephen has.


It's funny listening to you guys, since we routinely head 20 - 30 miles out and I never gave it a second thought... until now!
My first ever trip was 90odd miles - didn't bother me either.

Having said that our waters can be really dangerous - the Atlantic gives us quite a battering.

British waters are very shallow which makes things worse most of the time. On the West coast I would have to go over 300 miles to find water over 300' deep - Scotland has deep water though and the West coast of Ireland is pretty close to the Atlantic deeps.

It seems to me boats are really only in trouble when they meet the land!!!
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Old 03 February 2007, 09:56   #16
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It seems to me boats are really only in trouble when they meet the land!!!
Or when they have no power and end up side on to the waves and capsize...
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Old 03 February 2007, 11:35   #17
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It seems to me boats are really only in trouble when they meet the land!!!
Kind of like falling from a roof... It's not the fall that hurts, it's the sudden stop at the bottom!

I didn't realize the water there was so shallow. Combined with the North Atlantic weather, that explains the miserable conditions you folks must face at times... and the large number of RIBS.
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Old 03 February 2007, 13:10   #18
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Sea drogue

I dont think its possible to carry and pay out the amount of rope that would be required for any sort of depth. If the anchour does not have the ncessary "lay on the chain" it will not work.
Furthermore, If you have a heavy amount of anchour out, it may stop the bot from Bobbing with teh waves causing very uncomfortable jerking and possible swamping.

A sea Anchour (of the right size for the boat, normally they are too small for the boat) and on the correct length of "light but strong enough line" is the ideal choice to bide you time. The length of pay out is important to be able to adjust given different sea conditions. If used incorrectly (such as Rope tightening as the boat is about to rise up steep crest can cause swamping), the sea anchour can cause swamping, if used correctly it is an excellent and light (also folds away) way of stopping drift (especially lee shore).

my 2p worth..
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Old 03 February 2007, 13:41   #19
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A sea Anchour (of the right size for the boat, normally they are too small for the boat) and on the correct length of "light but strong enough line" is the ideal choice to bide you time. The length of pay out is important to be able to adjust given different sea conditions. If used incorrectly (such as Rope tightening as the boat is about to rise up steep crest can cause swamping), the sea anchour can cause swamping, if used correctly it is an excellent and light (also folds away) way of stopping drift (especially lee shore).
I know very little about sea anchors and I am thinking about getting one.

What would you say was the right size sea anchor for your boat.
How long would the line need to be ?
What sort of breaking strain is needed ?

Sorry, but I am just asking questions to learn.

Thanks

Tim
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Old 03 February 2007, 14:13   #20
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biggest you can get usually does the trick - within reason!!! The largest size conventional one is great as they all fold up so small. The most important thing is to have plenty of rope - say 300' or so - otherwise they just pull out of the waves - you often have to fine tune the length depending on conditions. Remember they can also be streamed astern as a drogue.
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