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Old 30 December 2002, 08:57   #71
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The Cabin is Pretty Useless

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Originally posted by TIM
Brian has confirmed what I thought about small cabined boats , that the cabin is pretty useless...
Whoooaa, hold on there, Tim. Brian will be the first to admit, I feel sure, that his view on cabins is a pretty personal thing. My view, also pretty personal, is that the cabin is pretty much essential.

I am attaching two pics and you will see how I've arranged mine.

In the forward cabin I have 2 pilot berths. These are rigged up with a mini block and tackle arrangement to the ceiling. On passage they are hauled up and make excellent storage space. Kit does not get chucked about the cabin and the floor is totally clear. If it gets wet, no sweat.

In harbour you lower the bunk and it makes an excellent, well ventilated sleeping berth.

In the main cabin I also have a long berth with a bridge on it. One of the two seats is mounted on the frame. This bunk is very comfortable when under way and the person not driving - usually me - can enjoy a cosy doze well wrapped in a sleeping bag. I can promise you that a run back over the Channel after a lunchtime bottle of wine passes very pleasantly as Mrs Garside gets us home.

If you are considering a cabin RIB do not ignore the space for berths. In my book they're a must.
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Old 30 December 2002, 09:01   #72
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Re: The Cabin is Pretty Useless

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Originally posted by Mike Garside
In the main cabin I also have a long berth with a bridge on it. One of the two seats is mounted on the frame. This bunk is very comfortable when under way...
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Old 30 December 2002, 09:12   #73
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I think,

What Brian was saying is that he personaly doesnt use his for sleeping in when in port
Nobody is suggesting that you can indeed sleep when a boat is under way in a front Cabin of any Power vessel, and I for one can say even in a big yacht it is difficult if not impossible in a bit of a swell.

The front Cabin on any cabin rib is a great place for a kip in port,but not at 20knts.

We have a double on the left with fold down table as you walk in through the Watertight door.On the right is cooker fridge sink.Then Open hatch in the middle for acsess to double berth on port side,and acsess to shower,toilet,sink starboard side.

Two Shock absorber seats one either side of front hatchway in wheelhouse.

Crazyhorse
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Old 30 December 2002, 10:40   #74
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Yes Tim,
I am not saying cabins are useless, just that I don't use mine like/as much as I thought I would do when I ordered it. The nature of my type of ribing difers from Mike's-that's all. I think Mike has a brilliant setup (not to mention his "understanding" with Di about the driving!!). Mike's done enough of the roughty-toughty stuff and would like to be "indoors". I haven't done enough and prefer to be out of doors. But as you can see, if the weather were to be atrocious, I would prefer to be on Mike's boat. If it were to be a totally scorchio day-then maybe he would prefer to spend a little time in my outdoors Executive Club Smoking Lounge (i.e. the 4-seater wraparound, extremely comfortable back bench seat) on my boat.
I guess if we all had 45 foot ribs we could have both-but we haven't.
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Old 30 December 2002, 10:46   #75
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Well you can indeed do both in a cabin rib,as a 2nd steering position outside on the back of the wheelhouse,means you can sit in the sun and drive the boat or go below when its chilly.

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Old 30 December 2002, 12:03   #76
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Maybe my choice of words were a bit abrupt, I think that the Scorpion is a fine boat but the cabin is only of any real pratical use in port or flat sea. As you know we have great wet weather most of the year and in the scorpion, the cabin is in the wrong place, IMHO, that not to say I wouldnt like one !!!!

Mike, I think you rib is dam near perfect for what I eventualy want in a rib, The only draw back is that you will miss the sun on your face, on good days ( about 3 good ones a year). The Sleeping areas are good, and adjustable pipe cot bunks are great and comfartable. But only used in port. (also good storage)I find on any boat that sail/motor boat etc a pilot house bunk is the most used one on the boat....

No rib is perfect yet, ( maybe crazyhorse has the answer ) Mikes rib is great but, silghtly heavy with the large cabin. The Scoripion is open air, fast, but no rain protection, the Redbay has no sleeping area and limited storage.

So its down to personal choice, My opion is that Ribs are great fast crusing boats, and most ports are within 2-12 hours ( if you have the endurance for that long ) so you might as well go with a overnight bag and a credit card. Once you get there in comfert and saftey, and stay in a good bed and a meal, it leaves you in good form to do battle the next day.

PS I am not trying to insult anyones boat, Just adding MHO. Mabye when/if I have a cabin rib, I might be on better ground to talk.
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Old 30 December 2002, 14:40   #77
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Just to be a little accurate on this,

A twin Diesel boat open boat will weigh aproximately the same as a single Diesel Wheelhouse rib.

I havnt got all the answers Mike but Im going to give them Open Cabin Hard nose Ribs a run for there money.It will be fun.

Give us a call when you finished that project of yours.

Good luck
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Old 30 December 2002, 15:23   #78
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CABIN RIBs

I am reading this very interesting Thread and the various (usefull) points and views regarding cabins on RIBs.
However, what I think has missed is the question why a cabin is necessary on a RIB or why one would buy a RIB with a cabin (heavier, not so versatile as an open RIB, not very towable etc) instead of an open RIB.
As I see it the cabin on RIBs similar to the Scorpion (ie the wheel house outside and not that much room inside either, basic construction etc) is made purely to be use in the Med ie Spain, Portugal, SFrance, Italy, Greece, Australia, SAfrica etc where climate is mild with lost of sunshine. The RIB can be used for a long weekend or even a 7 day or more holiday excursion during the summer hot months where people (if they want to be prepared to sleep rough) can spend one/two or as many nights as they can stand on the boat (I've never seen anyone sleeping on a cabin RIB so far).
Similarly RIBs with enclosed wheel houses and larger and more confortable accomodation area like say the TITAN Boats, are made for the northern climates (ie UK, NFrance, NSpain, Holland, Poland, Canada etc) where the weather is harsh with lots of rain and cold summers. One can esily stay in the cabin and have his 'comfort' without too much of inconvenience.
All in all (I think) is what one wants the RIB for.
Where and for what this boat will be used for and for how long will it be used in a year? Would this RIB be used by all the family as a hotel or just to go around on long trips etc.
The expence of a proper (i.e. air con, confortable beds, water maker, heating, hot + cold water shower, micro wave, dishwasher, washing machine, cooker, beds NO BANKS etc etc) confortable cabin (RIB) depends on these (and MORE) parameters.
A line should be drawn however, as to how much one is prepared to spend for what is at the end of the day a CABIN ON A RIB (I know all about the safety aspects between a RIB and a cruiser but this is not the issue now).
By the way I hear prices of a 10 mtr cabin RIB to be in excess of £100,000 in the UK (and think that people must have lots of dosh to burn) where for that money one can buy a 38 ft sailing catamaran with PROPER accomodation for 10 people and lots and lots of space or indeed a large cruiser (may be up to 50 ft LOA 2nd hand) with all the comforts of life on it.
These are ONLY my views as a potential cabin RIB purchaser who is now reconsidering and has a re-think i.e. should I stay with the open RIB instead??
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Old 30 December 2002, 16:12   #79
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Cabin ribs

Manos

earlier on I posted 2 photos of a Parker 750 cabin rib. This rib is used by the inland water rescue WOPR in Poland in the Mazurian lake district. The inland water rescue service in Poland favour cabin ribs since a lot of patrolling is carried out and in different weather conditions. On the lakes which are huge there are no great waves like on the seas and the addition of a cabin does not have much affect on the speed and performance of the rib. The same rib with cabin would not be suitable or effective for off/ inshore rescue. Here the requirement is for open ribs .
The cabin is typical for commercial application, ie jockey seatings and space for navigation aids, no space for bunks or even a portable loo as these luxury items are not required.

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Old 30 December 2002, 16:15   #80
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Manos,

You Temptress you,
You are quite right,There seems to be some confusion over what is a Cabin Rib.
I think an open boat with a cabin on it has advantages in good weather in daylight.You can go offshore cruise to places pop in to the beach,stay overnight in the front Cabin whilst moored of the beach and genuinly enjoy yourself.Grate for weekends away for 2.
You can be home for tea on Sunday.

Now then,Im sorry if I upset anybody but,thats your lot for 125kplus?

If you want to use it at night it will be cold,maybe wet in any country you go to.You couldnt get 4 people and two dogs on there for sure.
This is proberbly one of my daftest statements so far,but we went for a 4 berth wheelhouse rib cruiser becouse we have two tiny little dogs and a my very annoying partners sister,who will be bumming a ride with a new boyfrend every 6 months.

I initially wanted a 2 berth but realised that for a familly it was inpractical and I expect more for a 100k+.

A rib with a wheelhouse is the most econimicl transport you can get and its versatility is exeptional,as your pushing fresh air.

Running costs are important to us as we going to retire and use the boat,so when red becomes £4.00 a gallon it will not be to much trouble.

Withought boreing you a true Cabin Rib canot be beat.Once you go over a certain size the benefits decrease.That size is dependant on hp and weight and economy.There is also an optimum speed,and Dag Pikes book inflatable boats goes into those.You cant do more than 10knts in real lumpy bad weather anyway.

When a boat is built to Loyds service craft rules check the small print in your manual it will say a vessel should be navigated at a reasonable speed for the conditions.I.E if you drive it like a mad man there is no warrantie,and the stucture/and design is based on those loads at there speed restrictions.You can be held responsible if you had a problem and over did it,and it might not be with the law,it could be with Mother nature herself?.All teck stuff.

See ya soon Manos.

Crazyhorse



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