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Old 17 September 2012, 10:54   #1
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Broaching

What is Broaching? is it the same as stuffing?

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Old 17 September 2012, 11:02   #2
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It's normally when a boat is in a following sea & the boat is picked up and starts to surf or run down the wave to a point when the bows dig in causing the stern to then get swung or pushed around then causing the boat to Broach or roll over on its side .
Towing a drouge or a long heavy rope ,tyre or a string of crab pots behind can help in most cases with a displacement boat .
Boats with a deep forefoot and flat stern or transom can be dodgy in a following sea such as the traditional Yorkshire coble .
Great boats going into waves but a bit hairy in a big following sea ,
Best way is if you slow down and try let the wave pass under and not let the boat surf or run away down the wave out of control .
Double Enders are better for this .
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Old 17 September 2012, 11:44   #3
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Great explanation - short version, turning sideways to the wave or surf.
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Old 17 September 2012, 11:55   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treerat View Post
Great explanation - short version, turning sideways to the wave or surf.

Not just because of wave action....

"Broaching" is used to define a vessel turning sideways (normally quite suddenly and violently) , not just because of sea conditions but actually through any external force.

ie: "the motor cruiser broached as a result of a collision with another vessel"

Or " The tugboat braoched due to excessive loads on its tow wire"



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Old 17 September 2012, 12:41   #5
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Originally Posted by m chappelow View Post
Best way is if you slow down and try let the wave pass under and not let the boat surf or run away down the wave out of control .
Or trim up a little and make sure that your speed is faster than the speed of the wave/swell. Surf it on your terms instead of the waves terms.
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Old 18 September 2012, 01:32   #6
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Coming from a sailing background we referred to a broach as a time when typically the sails were overpowered and the boat turned into the wind, as the helm lost control. Great feature for safety as the alternative is a knockdown.
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