Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 24 June 2017, 00:43   #1
Member
 
cgf10's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Poole
Boat name: Superfly
Make: Shearwater 860
Length: 8m +
Engine: Verado
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 380
Best polisher for GRP

I've become slightly OCD about my fiberglass looking nice. I'm considering a cordless polisher - does anyone have a view on a particular type or brand that's a combination of affordable and effective ? Best size ?
__________________

__________________
cgf10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 01:23   #2
RIBnet supporter
 
Pikey Dave's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Yorks
Boat name: Black Pig
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140a
MMSI: 235111389
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 9,153
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgf10 View Post
I've become slightly OCD about my fiberglass looking nice. I'm considering a cordless polisher - does anyone have a view on a particular type or brand that's a combination of affordable and effective ? Best size ?


Careful or you won't have any gel coat left
__________________
Rule#2: Never argue with an idiot. He'll drag you down to his level & then beat you with experience.
Rule#3: Tha' can't educate pork.
Rule#4:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=unkIVvjZc9Y
Pikey Dave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 01:50   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 867
I use one professionally on car paint - for compounding after flatting back following repainting.
Mine is heavy, not random orbit & corded - a battery powered one would be of no use for my purposes.
You MUST keep it moving & follow the instructions on the polish/compound you are using. Water is often used as a lubricant & a hand spray of the B&Q bottle type for misting plants works well.
If you stay too long in one spot heat build-up due to friction is rapid & a lot of damage can happen very quickly - guess how I found that one out.
Bear in mind that compounds and most polishes are abrasive - compounds are available in several grades of cut - so each time you use it you are removing material & the firmer the mop the more it will remove.
Compounding & polishing mops are most commonly available in 150mm (6") diameter & I prefer those that come with a plastic backer glued on. Thread size M14.

To do the hull of my boat I use Farecla G10 on a medium mop for cleaning & a wax polish for final shine by hand with microfibre cloths
You might find this of interest: Ask an Expert | farecla
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 01:52   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset
Boat name: Seabadger
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: DF140
MMSI: -
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 568
After I removed the antifoul on my boat (gel hadn't been keyed thankfully) I found a cheap Silverline polisher with a lambswool bonnet, Faracela G3 paste and lots of water spray did a good job followed by sponging off all the mess and polishing with autoglym super resin polish on a sponge head and buffing off with a dry cloth.

Bit of effort and the silverline polisher isn't great but on setting 1 or 2 it did the job
__________________
diver 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 02:10   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Length: 5m +
Engine: 135hp Mercury
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 867
I use G3 liquid all the time for removing the scratches left by 1500/2000 wet&dry after flatting car paint to remove nibs and texture with the final polish using G10.
Bear in mind that G3 more aggressive than G10.

You'll find a lot on youtube discussing the relative merits of lambswool or foam & it really comes down to personal preference.

Notwithstanding the comments about acrylic windows on the link I do a lot of these on caravans for a trade customer & G3 with a medium foam does a perfect job - just be careful with heat build-up & keep it lubricated.
__________________
paintman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 02:40   #6
RIBnet admin team
 
Nos4r2's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: The wilds of Wiltshire
Boat name: Dominator
Make: SR5.4
Length: 7m +
Engine: Yam 85
MMSI: 235055163
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 12,814
RIBase
Farecla Profile 300 paste seems to be better than G3 for gelcoat in my experience.Takes out scratches from 1000 grit easily. Used a medium Farecla foam and a corded silverline polisher. Did the Ballistic with that setup and it did a nice job, just keep a water spray bottle available while using it to stop the surface drying out.
__________________
Need spares,consoles,consumables,hire,training or even a new boat?

Please click HERE and HERE and support our Trade Members.

Join up as a Trade member or Supporter HERE
Nos4r2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 08:51   #7
Member
 
cgf10's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Poole
Boat name: Superfly
Make: Shearwater 860
Length: 8m +
Engine: Verado
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 380
Thanks gents, very helpful.
__________________
cgf10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2017, 15:46   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: suffolk
Boat name: not yet
Make: Nautica/ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Yamaha 115 & 60 4str
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 459
maybe a little bit hill billy but far cheaper to get a 14mm nut and bolt ,screw a blue plastic backed farcela sponge mop onto the bolt and lock it with a nut ,cut the head off the bolt and use it in a battery drill, speeds are probhably all wrong but worked for me ,and a drill is far more manouverable than one of those 10" angle grinders ,enables you to place the mop far easier ,especially when you are working upside down under the boat ,you can get the same style sheepskin type mop to finish with
__________________
Orwell boy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 June 2017, 00:59   #9
Member
 
beerbelly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: teesside
Make: valiant v570
Length: 5m +
Engine: mercury 100
MMSI: 232012453
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,067
i also paint cars for a living and instead of using a spray bottle for the water I just dip the sponge pad that's on the polisher into a bucket of water .just the sponge not the polisher mind lol. flings a lot of water off when you start up but its easier and the way I was taught (mind back in the 70,s we used air powered polishers and lambs wool bonnets and no one had heard of hse)
__________________

__________________
beerbelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:30.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.