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Old 19 February 2007, 14:23   #11
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Crewsaver preferred, otherwise Sea Safe.

Don't bother with 150N - if you're wearing normal clothing, or anything vaguely related to heavy weather clothing, only a 275N will turn you face up quickly. Also spend a bit more and get a decent sprayhood and light.

Buying cheap is flase economy - the jacket may look similar, but most jackets fail around key wear points - not external ones, but internal material folds are a favourite wear point.

Best for ribs is a proper rib jacket (like the RNLI ILB type, made by Crewsaver) which I use pretty much everyday and gives great bump protection as well as a degree of thermal protection.

150N are really only much use when wearing a drysuit.

Simon
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Old 19 February 2007, 15:07   #12
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One of the companies I do some work with is an organisation called Remploy, turns out they make most of the lifejackets in the UK then various cos rebrand them and sell them on.

Safe to say I took the oppurtunity to buy half a dozen 150N the other day for 15 each. ;-)
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Old 19 February 2007, 17:23   #13
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As regards the loosening of CO2 bottles I have read it is a very common problem. What about a tiny bit of LOW strength threadlock - the loctite purple one for example. Just got to make sure it is just applied to the thread on the bottle and doesn't go anywhere else!!!
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Old 20 February 2007, 03:49   #14
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There was also research done a few years ago that highlighted the fact that if you used a 275N jacket and were not heavy enough it was more dangerous that the 150N.
I seem to remember it was due to the fact that you were higher out of the water thus less stable and more likely to be capsized by the wave action. You would also be more wind movement effected
If I find the report again I'll link it
Jelly
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Old 20 February 2007, 06:21   #15
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As others have posted on here before, a potential problem with 275N jackets can be MOB recovery when it's inflated. The bladder is obviously a lot larger and more obtrusive than a 150/175N.

A significant hidden difference between models is whether the bladder is part of the cover or a separate skin. This will often have an effect on price as well. There may be extra bulk with a separate bladder of course but should be longer lasting as not so subject to outer wear.

It's all horses for courses and you should buy appropriate to your sort of boating and conditions.
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Old 20 February 2007, 15:46   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
As regards the loosening of CO2 bottles I have read it is a very common problem. What about a tiny bit of LOW strength threadlock - the loctite purple one for example. Just got to make sure it is just applied to the thread on the bottle and doesn't go anywhere else!!!
Don't think it would be a good idea. Just check the bottle a couple of times a year. keep it simple!
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Old 22 February 2007, 09:29   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
As regards the loosening of CO2 bottles I have read it is a very common problem. What about a tiny bit of LOW strength threadlock - the loctite purple one for example. Just got to make sure it is just applied to the thread on the bottle and doesn't go anywhere else!!!
I have not been and looked but I seem to remember the CO2 screws into a hard plastic surround (?) if this is the case I would definitly not use any form of thread lock. I used some on brass threads incased in ABS not so long ago and it decayed the plastic causing it to break up. Just a thought....
I have used PTFE tape on plastic though to no detriment but I really agree with Cork Rib the more you keep an eye on your kit the better it will look after you!
Steve
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Old 22 February 2007, 18:34   #18
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Just seen an article that covers several life Jackets in Motor Boat Owner I think.

Anyone interested and I can dig it out.

It covers a few makes...

Aidan
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Old 23 February 2007, 08:40   #19
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There have been quite a few reports of larger jackets being so cumbersome that they cause all sorts of problems. A few people have drowned because they couldn't get out from a capsized vessel due to the bulk of their lifejackets.

Another factor nobody seems to mention is an individuals own buoyancy. Some divers need a load of lead to make them sink - others hardly any. A really skinny person will need a much more buoyant lifejacket than someone who has their own built in - Jordan for example probably wouldn't need anything and is bound to be self righting!!! They don't call life jackets Mae Wests for nothing!!!
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