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Old 02 July 2013, 05:02   #1
AJ.
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Beach anchoring

Hi guys,

I am off down to Pentewan Sands in a couple of weeks which is a great campsite in a shelterd bay (depending on wind direction) on the South side in Cornwall.

They have a tractor launch there and depending on the weather conditions I was debating about leaving the boat in the water overnight and that got me thinking about anchoring techniques.

I have a 5kg Bruce type anchor 6m chain and 60m of multiplait as the main anchor off the bow. Then was thinking about keeping the boat facing the waves so using my 5kg Danforth with 3 meters of chain and 40m of 3 strand on the stern.

My plan would only be to leave her in if it was dead calm otherwise I will pull her out every day.

What are people's thoughts on the anchor technique mentioned above as in a tidal area but will anchor out of the surf zone. And leaving her in overnight. I may probably get more sleep paying the extra money to pull her out every day
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Old 02 July 2013, 05:12   #2
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Hi we have stayed at pentewan many times & have seen the weather lovely in the evening & horrible next day I've also seen boats sunk on the beach due to the rollers comeing in

I personally wouldn't leave a boat at anchor off that beach regardless of anchor style

not worth the sleepless nights imho

enjoy the holiday though awesome spot!
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Old 02 July 2013, 05:14   #3
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Hi guys,

I was debating about leaving the boat in the water overnight and that got me thinking about anchoring techniques.
Dont.

Pentewan is exposed to Southerly conditions and you only have sand hold. It's just not worth the worry.

If you were in one of the rivers (Fowey, Fal etc.) maybe.
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Old 02 July 2013, 06:47   #4
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Cheers Beamishken and Mollers.

Yeah have been going to Pentewan for years and the weather can change quickly.

Appreciate the comments and local knowledge will take her out and tuck her up at the end of each day.

The 20 launch a day is not the issue just means you are a bit more tied to the tractor running hours and no evening runs unless you put her in Meva which is then a pain with vehicles as I am never doing that walk again it killed me when I was a teenager
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:01   #5
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Whenever I've left a boat at anchor overnight I've used both anchors off the bow . Make sure both are set , but with little or no 'pull' on the back up . One acts as back up incase the main one fails and gives the ones thats slipped a chance to set again naturally

I'd not want to anchor off the stern as its a sure fire way of flooding the boat if the bow anchor lets go. I know water just beads off your boat, but it wont bead off that much

Local advice trumps all however .....
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:20   #6
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I did it once on relatively sheltered Ullswater, the wind blew up in the middle of the night and I ended up sitting on the beach watching the boat for hours convinced it was sinking/dragging etc.

I would check your insurance as well, most policies exclude claims if the boat is left unoccupied at anchor.
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:21   #7
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With regards to anchoring techniques (as I have made my mind up not to leave the boat in overnight)

Had been doing some research and my OP idea i guess came from yachting techniques (using a kedge). I suppose for them they are going to be onboard overnight and also they don't have a low transom for water to enter should the main anchor fail and the boat spins sea on (hadn't thought of that).

Not that I ever plan to be in this position, but is using two anchors as you described Pete I suppose at 45 degrees the strongest way to hold a boat. Would this keep it facing rollers/waves if the wind is blowing in the opposite direction?
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:43   #8
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Yep, guess two at 90' (45'off line ahead) apart would give best hold.

If the boat would stay nose to sea I think would all be down to wind strength and size of waves!

You saw my everyday anchor technique on Sunday..so best ignore anything I say....(that was a how not to demo..but still held the three boats....when I'd actually managed to tie them all together anyway!)
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:46   #9
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I used to run an 88' motor yacht with a shallow V planning hull for a guy out of Canada and after dragging one night about 1/4 of a mile I always used both bow anchors from then on. Problem with the shallow V hull was that it used to 'sail' back and forth and snatch at the anchor when the wind picked up.

Used to set the anchors at 45 degrees off the bow with a scope of about 5 to 1 depending on the swinging room available. If there was plenty of room would stick out more chain equally on both anchors.

Using a kedge anchor on a sailing yacht can be a way of holding the bow into the wind / waves or to prevent a yacht swinging on the change of tide i.e. narrow river.
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Old 02 July 2013, 07:46   #10
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Yep, guess two at 90' (45'off line ahead) apart would give best hold.

If the boat would stay nose to sea I think would all be down to wind strength and size of waves!

You saw my everyday anchor technique on Sunday..so best ignore anything I say....(that was a how not to demo..but still held the three boats....when I'd actually managed to tie them all together anyway!)
Those poor Seahorses wouldn't have stood a chance at that anchor entry speed
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