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Old 09 July 2006, 11:36   #1
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Another Boating Accident

Man looses 2 legs in accident in Hythe marina, Southampton.

HERE
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Old 09 July 2006, 11:46   #2
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Sad ...

Does anyone know what sort of time this happened because i was on the hythe ferry at about 11.10am and i saw about 5 jet-skies playing around
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Old 09 July 2006, 11:51   #3
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Says coastguard arrived shortly after 1600 in THIS news link
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Old 09 July 2006, 15:07   #4
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This kind of accident simply shouldnt happen. Someone wasnt watching what was going on in the immediate vacinity of their boat. - Anyone know what kind of boat it was ?
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Old 09 July 2006, 16:50   #5
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Tragic - nasty things props - maybe the jetskis aren't so dangerous after all???

Maybe the person driving the boat didn't realise it was still in gear??? Who knows - more lives ruined though!!!
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Old 09 July 2006, 17:34   #6
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The person was climbing into the boat at the stern, in gear trousers got caught in prop. They lifted the boat today with his trousers still wrapped round the prop.
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Old 09 July 2006, 18:03   #7
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The person was climbing into the boat at the stern, in gear trousers got caught in prop. They lifted the boat today with his trousers still wrapped round the prop.

Very sad, these types of accidents do not need to happen.
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Old 10 July 2006, 13:26   #8
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Did any of these guys have any powerboat training?
Engine always in neutral, if not even switched off when recovering a MOB.
Nick.
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Old 10 July 2006, 13:41   #9
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Engine always in neutral, if not even switched off when recovering a MOB.
Sorry Nik, have to disagree there. Engine ALWAYS SWITCHED OFF when recovering MOB.

(no bricks throght me windows please )

Very tragic but best await the MAIB report.
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Old 10 July 2006, 14:24   #10
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Originally Posted by nik
Did any of these guys have any powerboat training?
Engine always in neutral, if not even switched off when recovering a MOB.
Nick.
Do you REALLY need training to know how dangerous a spinning prop is??? And it is NOT only the bloke in the boat - I don't think I would approach the back of a boat with the engine running!!!
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Old 10 July 2006, 15:08   #11
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Do you REALLY need training to know how dangerous a spinning prop is??? And it is NOT only the bloke in the boat - I don't think I would approach the back of a boat with the engine running!!!
seemingly not.
I can remember doing my PBII course and having the kill cord and engine off stressed so many times that I thought it was maybe a bit of overkill.
But having read about so many deaths over the last few years, I can appreciate how important these things are.
I have thought maybe a resume of accident reports should be included into PB courses in order to stress the fact that these horrors do actually happen and it is not just a theory.
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Old 10 July 2006, 16:06   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribald
Sorry Nik, have to disagree there. Engine ALWAYS SWITCHED OFF when recovering MOB.

(no bricks throght me windows please )

Very tragic but best await the MAIB report.
I agree 100%. Engine ALWAYS OFF when recovering MOB. I even always cut out my diesel when recovering MOB and we all know diesels don't like to be stopped and started
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Old 10 July 2006, 18:04   #13
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I agree 100%. Engine ALWAYS OFF when recovering MOB. I even always cut out my diesel when recovering MOB and we all know diesels don't like to be stopped and started
It all depends on the conditions - I don't think engine off is a good idea in a force 8 when the wind is blowing you onto the rocks!!!
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Old 11 July 2006, 03:41   #14
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It all depends on the conditions - I don't think engine off is a good idea in a force 8 when the wind is blowing you onto the rocks!!!
One could possibly question the skipper's wisdom being near a rocky lee shore in a F8. You could always deploy the anchor and veer down to the MOB.
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Old 11 July 2006, 04:56   #15
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Do people apply this "engine off for MOBs" rule to approaching anyone in or on the water e.g. wakeboarders, donut riders?
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Old 11 July 2006, 05:08   #16
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if approaching someone in the water then i think it is best to have engine off asap, just imagine if you were in the water and a boat was coming towards you, terrifying to say the least.......as for climbing on the boat from the back with the engine running........i cant imagine what they were thinking of, very tragic indeed.

common sense must prevail.
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Old 11 July 2006, 05:37   #17
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In my pb2, we were taught that you drift up to the mob either against the wind or tide BOW FIRST, in doing so killing the engine with the kill cord when you are a couple of boat lengths away. Doing the PB2 for this advice alone is more than worth it! Did this driver reverse up to the mob, because nobody in their right mind would swim up to a stern with a moving prop. My thoughts are with the fellow and his family.
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Old 11 July 2006, 05:42   #18
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Do people apply this "engine off for MOBs" rule to approaching anyone in or on the water
Rarely turn the engine off to pick up divers, and that includes over the stern of the Pacific. Nor do many of the chater boat skippers we dive with. Its a personal choice but in 20 years of diving I can't remember having a problem.

I agree with Codders, I want the engine running but will make sure the gearbox is in neutral. If its choppy the boat will drift faster than a person in the water so you may have to use brief touches of forward to stay alongside.

Vince, killing the engine with the killcord a couple of boat lengths from a person in the water would mean you have no drive and very little steering just as your making the final aproach. I am not going to say its wrong, but I would not teach that on a PB2 course. I perfer to stop the boat dead in the water a couple of boat lengths away and then move the boat next to the diver. I encourage students to "think, plan then act" at this point and go round again if they are not happy. This ensures you don't over run by miss-judging the speed. I agree with the approach into wind if its a sensible option.

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Old 11 July 2006, 06:54   #19
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One could possibly question the skipper's wisdom being near a rocky lee shore in a F8. You could always deploy the anchor and veer down to the MOB.
I was on about a rescue type situation which many MOBs tend to be - the experts(RNLI) don't kill their engines as far as I am aware.
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Old 11 July 2006, 07:50   #20
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Vince, killing the engine with the killcord a couple of boat lengths from a person in the water would mean you have no drive and very little steering just as your making the final aproach. I am not going to say its wrong, but I would not teach that on a PB2 course. I perfer to stop the boat dead in the water a couple of boat lengths away and then move the boat next to the diver. I encourage students to "think, plan then act" at this point and go round again if they are not happy. This ensures you don't over run by miss-judging the speed. I agree with the approach into wind if its a sensible option.

Pete [/QUOTE]

I wonder if some rya courses teach differently? I can understand being taught if an inexperienced student, that safety is of paramount concern, and using the kill switch/turning off the engine comletley is the ONLY way to go about this.
But also the experience of the driver would come into play, as would the circumstances of the rescue. MOB might get panicky and start grabbing anything they could, might mean a more difficult rescue, and of course the weather.
I suppose the one thing the RYA cant teach is experience, that can only come with years of being in different situations.
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