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Old 18 August 2013, 16:54   #11
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prob not the one I had then...mine had same floor problem (and same stuff on edges to try and stop they leak)...and I was never going to get round to fixing it this year...but having also read nashers thread I thought it was fixable.

prep and patience I reckon will always win through on floor fixes...
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Old 18 August 2013, 17:53   #12
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Might try sealing of the other end somehow, filling the cavity with water, and using a really bright light to locate the air bubbles? Or maybe just fill it and feel for the bubbles? Be creative but it helps to know where to go before performing the surgery.

So is tht part of the floor in fact glued?
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Old 18 August 2013, 19:14   #13
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It looks like the floor in this area is glued to the central bit of fabric that holds the two floor sections together. I have attached a picture. If I could mark it's position, unglue it then reglue it after patching, I think that would be ideal. I have acetone and two part PVC glue so should manage to do a reasonable job of it (I hope!)

I have removed pretty much all of the yellow sealant gloop now, so we are back to bare plastic.

If I use a heat gun how likely am I to melt the floor? Would a hair dryer do the job?

Ill try and take pictures as I go along, in case anyone else ends up with a similar problem in future.
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Old 19 August 2013, 07:05   #14
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I'd say the previous owner has failed dismally at trying to solve the leaking problem by applying liberal amounts of epoxy. A definite no no.

A boat repairer would strip back the layers to locate the source of the leak. A heat gun is okay to use on this fabric, just don't over do it. Fabric at most should be very hot to touch. Pry the layers apart with a strong blunt tool. Take your time. Continue testing for leaks as the fabric layers are removed. Over time you will locate the exact point of the problem.
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Old 20 August 2013, 15:29   #15
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progress has been made. S4Simon - you were spot on about the heat gun. I bought an el-cheapo one from B+Q, put it on its lowest setting, and the glue just peeled away like lifting a post it note.

I have take it back perhaps 6 inches, then repeated the soapy water trick. as you can see, its leaking from perhaps the most awkward to patch spot I can imagine, right on an edge seam.

Its a tiny little hole to be honest, but definitely the culprit as it hisses and bubbles nicely. Its more of a crack.

Any ideas how I could approach this with a patch? Or should I use some proper PU sealant on it, like aquasure (I see scarlett Jester did this on his air floor and it worked well). I REALLY would rather it was patched, but it looks like its going to be a bit of a blighter to do given how its right on the edge. When inflated this area changes shape significantly, with the corner itself forming a ridge right next to the crack. I suppose as the area is very flat when deflated, I could just patch over it and hope the patch conforms to shape when I inflate it?
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Old 20 August 2013, 15:41   #16
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If you can get it flat when deflated you're laughing.

Prep it well and get a good sized patch over it.

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Old 20 August 2013, 19:52   #17
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Okay for this tricky repair I would apply a small amount of VLP to the affected area (covering a 10mm area - the hole and surrounds) Apply 2 coats - waiting 30 minutes between each coat. this adhesive is a liquid vinyl which will adhere and flex with the fabric.



Then apply a standard round patch over the area as per the pic below. The importance is to force the patch into the creases with a blunt implement.

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Old 21 August 2013, 18:07   #18
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Thanks S4Simon + Nasher.

I got on with the repair as soon as I saw Nashers reply, but I'm fairly pleased I did nearly exactly what you suggested simon, only with a rectangular patch rather than round. I worked the patch and adhesive with the back of a spoon to get any bubbles out, and to get the patch into all the nooks and crannies. I left some heavy bits and pieces on the area to flatten it whilst the glue is setting.

Out of interest, is there any advantage to using round patches rather than square, should I need to do any repairs in future?

We will see how it holds up when I inflate it once it has all cured properly. I'll use the soapy water again around the patch to be 100% there are no leaks. If the repair seems solid, I will stick down the fabric linking the other side again and leave it all to cure for a few more days. Fingers crossed, if all goes well I hope this will leave the deck good as new.
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Old 21 August 2013, 19:12   #19
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You can use square patches as long as the corners are rounded. Otherwise that's where they can get caught and start to peel away over time.
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Old 22 August 2013, 03:12   #20
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In the future always use rounded corners, as mentioned it helps keeps the corners from lifting. In this cse though the corners are covered by the next layer are they not? If so it is not of concern.
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