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Old 10 June 2013, 10:56   #21
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- Whoever spots such a tiny sib at that distance from land is obliged to change its way and rescue it.
- Sibs are used as safety boats, but when used so it is mandatory to take a satellite GPS distress signal SOLAS radio. And many other things.
- Thousands of africans a year die crossing the Mediterranean to reach Europe in that way. They risk for a better life. You just do it for fun. Good.
- I bet there are currents in there. You do not need big waves, any big ship will not spot you in its way and may capsize your boat. You may even face fog. Too many dangers. You can drive as pissed as a fart and you can skip your small sib 15 miles from land. It is a matter of time to face your disgrace or what's worse, others'.
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Old 11 June 2013, 10:43   #22
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Crappy seamanship all around.
I think that's a little harsh.

Certainly one should venture out with an eye on conditions, but the OP said he was caught out in 4 foot seas, not that he went out in them. I'll give him a pass on that. I've had conditions deteriorate while I was out, and had to come back through stuff I wouldn't have started a trip in; I'm guessing most on here have as well. (Then again, I've also gone out in stuff I probably shouldn't have. Oh, well...)

That said, short period swell or really choppy water is about the worst you can try to push a SIB through. Not that the boat generally won't handle it, but any kind of speed will beat the crap out of people on board. About the best you can do is to either slow down and try to mitigate the pounding, or if it's primarily an organized swell you're fighting, change the angle of attack to essentially lengthen the period you're dealing with. Often the fastest way back is a tacking maneuver that lets you run at a bit of speed. Doesn't do a whole lot for chop though.

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Old 11 June 2013, 11:13   #23
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I think that's a little harsh.
I wasn't responding to the OP but to this:

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Originally Posted by Nick Hearne View Post
When Zurk says open seas
I think you have to remember where he is!
Not saying it is right or wrong but he is in a capable little sib which will remain afloat bar the total air loss!
Where is your spirit of adventure you knockers?
I don't think "not sinking" is the barometer of a good vs bad day lol. Or that we should be encouraging people to cross the Strait of Georgia in 10ft SIBs. 4ft seas would be pretty normal there on most winter days and most summer afternoons too. Summer mornings are frequently flat (probably to the point of boring some folks here).
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Old 11 June 2013, 16:46   #24
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Been watching this tread as I am a new to all this but have wondered what the best way to deal with unexpected conditions. I know the weather can be unpredictable even if you are only a mile from the coast. This dudes got some to be out that far!

I only go a mile or so from the coast in my 3.8m sib, so is the advice you guys are offering here:

go fast and hold on? Or is it it best to take it steady and go with the waves or cut across them?
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Old 11 June 2013, 23:28   #25
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When you see a weather change coming but can still plane, make haste toward shelter. That does not mean to go as fast as the boat will go but as fast as the seas allow.

Once the bad stuff hits, reduce speed but still maintain steerage. Speed is adjusted to match what the waves are doing and sometimes a course change is needed. Someone mentioned tacking to help ease the pitch of the boat. That is not unusual at all.

Sometimes you need to change trim by mechanical means or weight shifting. Heading into the seas or having a following sea running in the direction you want to go requires different trim. Don't try to jump over waves in a following sea as the face of the waves are steeper than the backside. You could pitch pole (flip end over end). Also, don't let the waves hit you from the side as you may capsize.

The best teacher is experience. If you have the chance, ride with an experienced skipper and pay attention to what he does. Just as seas vary, so does the manner in which you control the boat. Books have been written on this subject and are helpful, but you go by the seat of your pants and feel at times. Sounds trite, but keep the top side up and you will be okay. If it gets too rough, just maintain steerage and do not try to make too much headway.
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Old 12 June 2013, 04:18   #26
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When you see a weather change coming but can still plane, make haste toward shelter. That does not mean to go as fast as the boat will go but as fast as the seas allow.

Once the bad stuff hits, reduce speed but still maintain steerage. Speed is adjusted to match what the waves are doing and sometimes a course change is needed. Someone mentioned tacking to help ease the pitch of the boat. That is not unusual at all.

Sometimes you need to change trim by mechanical means or weight shifting. Heading into the seas or having a following sea running in the direction you want to go requires different trim. Don't try to jump over waves in a following sea as the face of the waves are steeper than the backside. You could pitch pole (flip end over end). Also, don't let the waves hit you from the side as you may capsize.

The best teacher is experience. If you have the chance, ride with an experienced skipper and pay attention to what he does. Just as seas vary, so does the manner in which you control the boat. Books have been written on this subject and are helpful, but you go by the seat of your pants and feel at times. Sounds trite, but keep the top side up and you will be okay. If it gets too rough, just maintain steerage and do not try to make too much headway.
Very well said.

There is a further point to my previous statement that if you are on a stretch where the distance across a strait is 30 miles, that you are never more than 15 miles from shore. The point being that if along that same stretch you are 25 miles from the destination shore, you are only 5 miles from shore.

If you are on the water and the conditions really go down the toilet, find the nearest shelter, rather than pushing through to your originally intended destination.
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Old 12 June 2013, 10:48   #27
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Originally Posted by captnjack View Post
I wasn't responding to the OP but to this:
Sorry, Jack.


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I don't think "not sinking" is the barometer of a good vs bad day lol.
Perhaps not, but not sinking will be a better day than sinking.


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Or that we should be encouraging people to cross the Strait of Georgia in 10ft SIBs.
Well, yeah; I thought the OP was a little extreme in the 1st post, but cut him a little slack as he survived. Long way to go in rough water.

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Old 12 June 2013, 10:54   #28
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It should also be noted that there are times it is better to be off shore than very near to shore. The natural way of thinking is that near shore is safe off shore is dangerous.

Near shore (lea) is very dangerous. You should give a lea shore a wide berth. Also the wave lenght may be kinder in deep water usually found off shore where as inshore the water may have a more severe chop which may be more troublesome to a small boart either SIB or RIB

TSM
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Old 12 June 2013, 11:31   #29
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Perhaps not, but not sinking will be a better day than sinking.



jky[/QUOTE]
Unless you're diving, that is.
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Old 19 June 2013, 05:57   #30
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Originally Posted by captnjack View Post
I know exactly where he is, my RIB is 15.5 ft long (33% bigger) and I don't go out in the Strait of Georgia with 4ft seas. Mostly because 4ft seas can turn into 8ft (or 12ft) seas, often with a 5 second period especially if the wind opposes the tide - they are punishing to the boat and me.

He may not be able to actually sink, but if the boat fully swamps (or flips) his gas will be water contaminated, his engine will stall and stop, and he'll be adrift in heavy seas with at best a handheld VHF to call someone to bail out his butt. And he'll be sitting in 50F water getting hypothermia.

Crappy seamanship all around.
Have to agree especially with regard to the water temperature, you won't last long in cold water mate. If you're going to push the envelope do it somewhere closer to the equator at least.
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