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Old 13 November 2009, 03:31   #11
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great story, and very nice whitetail. im sure the venison will cook up a treat. looks like some awesome country you have there.

strange that people are okay with eating meat from the supermarket, seeing fishing photos, but object to game pictures?
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Old 13 November 2009, 08:06   #12
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what does wolf taste like?
I hazard a guess at "not great" . Although, at the heel of the hunt, they're dogs and as such, edible. The heart can't be good, the Chinese have an uncomplimentary expression "a wolf's heart and a dog's lungs" to describe anything/one that's completely useless - they think neither part can be consumed, even by deploying their renowned culinary genius .
_______

This hunting subject was well flogged on here last season and I don't think we arrived at any consensus - in fact, it may have placed the seeds of the "bilges" concept in Mr K's mind (I may have a little helped too ).

Telling rural folks that killing game and game predators is like telling Muslims they should have a beer and relax - it's not going to work! The argument will just get personal.

So Canucks, bring on the hunting/boating stuff, I think most of us are impressed and more than a little envious. It certainly has to stir the soul more than an expedition out to The Dreaded Needles on a blustery Sunday. Frankly though, although I actively defend your right to your sport and freedom to discuss it, the trophy photography leaves me cold.

Incidentally, removing "excess" predators does not "help the ecology" of a region, it skews the herbivore populations and allows less fit animals breed, larger herbivore populations effect vegetation growth and change the nature of forests/grasslands etc. What you are doing is more akin to "ranching" or running a "crop" species in an open environment.

Bet they're still tasty though
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Old 13 November 2009, 08:59   #13
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I hazard a guess at "not great" . Although, at the heel of the hunt, they're dogs and as such, edible. The heart can't be good, the Chinese have an uncomplimentary expression "a wolf's heart and a dog's lungs" to describe anything/one that's completely useless - they think neither part can be consumed, even by deploying their renowned culinary genius .
_______

This hunting subject was well flogged on here last season and I don't think we arrived at any consensus - in fact, it may have placed the seeds of the "bilges" concept in Mr K's mind (I may have a little helped too ).

Telling rural folks that killing game and game predators is like telling Muslims they should have a beer and relax - it's not going to work! The argument will just get personal.

So Canucks, bring on the hunting/boating stuff, I think most of us are impressed and more than a little envious. It certainly has to stir the soul more than an expedition out to The Dreaded Needles on a blustery Sunday. Frankly though, although I actively defend your right to your sport and freedom to discuss it, the trophy photography leaves me cold.

Incidentally, removing "excess" predators does not "help the ecology" of a region, it skews the herbivore populations and allows less fit animals breed, larger herbivore populations effect vegetation growth and change the nature of forests/grasslands etc. What you are doing is more akin to "ranching" or running a "crop" species in an open environment.

Bet they're still tasty though
Complete agree - the pictures cause me no offence - but they were posted here in the full knowledge that they would be controversial.
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Old 13 November 2009, 09:04   #14
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Complete agree - the pictures cause me no offence - but they were posted here in the full knowledge that they would be controversial.
Whaaat? You mean I might have known some people would object?
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Old 13 November 2009, 09:28   #15
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Complete agree - the pictures cause me no offence - but they were posted here in the full knowledge that they would be controversial.
Ah well, it is the Pan-Canadian Trolling Championships after all and ya can't Troll with out a supturating carcass, sorry, I mean Bait
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Sorry Polwart, the general discourse below the line was not specifically addressed at you.
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Old 13 November 2009, 10:32   #16
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Ah well, it is the Pan-Canadian Trolling Championships after all and ya can't Troll with out a supturating carcass, sorry, I mean Bait

Cool word (had to look that one up) but inaccurate in its' useage given that there was no pus to be found.

Definitions of suppuration on the Web:

festering: (medicine) the formation of morbific matter in an abscess or a vesicle and the discharge of pus
pus: a fluid product of inflammation
wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

Pus is a whitish-yellow, yellow or yellow-brown substance produced during inflammatory pyogenic bacterial infections. An accumulation of pus in an enclosed tissue space is known as an abscess. ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suppuration

Decay in tissue producing pus, or the pus itself
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/suppuration

The production of pus.
pearlspad.net.nz/Medical.htm

the formation of, conversion into, or process of discharging pus
http://www.history.navy.mil/library/...enza_terms.htm
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Old 13 November 2009, 11:49   #17
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Cool word (had to look that one up) but inaccurate in its' usage
Patently, as at the ambient temperature in situ there could be no supturation after such a short duration. Wouldn't stop me using it though, the mental imagery suiting my purposes precisely

As Big Chris can confirm, I'm not known on Ribnet for the accuracy of my information. In other ways, I rarely miss....
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Old 13 November 2009, 12:46   #18
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... Annual PanCanadian Trolling Championships begin again
dat nobbur jonno tels mee dat hee wud lyke too av sum innput inntoo dis thred butt heez bizzy avin anuvver gow att fesant shewtin butt dis tyme wiv a shottgun.

hee sed dat hee fownd a .50cal a bitt too much gunn larst tyme

gArF
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Old 13 November 2009, 13:03   #19
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Wow…. Prairie tuber I really like that trapezoid shaped gear box in the front of your SIB. Who makes it, and were can I get my hands on one!

That looks like it was a great hunt and adventure! I am very envious about your road access to huntable areas…..

I can also appreciate the ice concerns but as our primary seasons open in August, it is generally not a concern south of the arctic circle and at lower elevations. But you never know what Mother Nature is going to throw your way, and I do have two acquaintances that spend two full days and one night playing ice breaker on lake Aleknagik (Google Earth, search for Dillingham AK, and it’s the first lake in the chain of four about 30 miles east of Dillingham) a few years back. They had been moose hunting way up on the third lake but on the return trip, when they popped out of the last agulowak they found that Aleknagik lake was completely iced over with about an inch of good clear ice. Not enough to walk on, and too much to plow thru with their 18’ flat bottom aluminum skiff….. they were about 15 miles from the village and took turns kneeling in the bow and busting a channel thru the ice with a spud bar…. For TWO DAYS… when they finally dragged their now pummeled, smashed and dented skiff ashore they were totally exhausted and extremely relieved to be out of the elements and off the lake!
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Old 13 November 2009, 13:12   #20
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"Incidentally, removing "excess" predators does not "help the ecology" of a region, it skews the herbivore populations and allows less fit animals breed, larger herbivore populations effect vegetation growth and change the nature of forests/grasslands etc. What you are doing is more akin to "ranching" or running a "crop" species in an open environment."



Willk, you are partially accurate on that one.

And I agree that it is indeed akin to ranching or running a crop species, albeit on a huge scale. There is no such thing as balance in nature, with huge cyclic swings in prey/predator populations being the “natural” way of the world. As much as we hate to admit it here in the great “wild” Alaska, there are no big game species, and few small game species that are left un-managed to fend for themselves. Native and Non-native subsistence hunting and fishing, commercial fishing, sport hunting and fishing, tourism, wildlife viewing and other groups all have a vested interest both philosophically and financially in the management of our fish and game species, with the goal of a “maximum sustainable yield”, healthy populations and optimum prey versus predator ratios…. The idea being to flatten the curve and do away with the natural cyclic swings. No it isn’t perfect, and there are many conflicting viewpoints and political pressure from both sides that skews things back and forth, but overall the system works fairly well.

While this may seem like a new way for man to meddle with mother nature, I can assure you that it has been actively practiced for more than 10,000 years. Even ice age cave men were smart enough to recognize that the predatory critters of their era could quickly decimate the numbers of prey animals that were available to feed the tiny bands of humans in any given area. You can bet that they skillfully and judiciously did all within there ability to control predator populations and limit the predication on their food supply.

Wolves, when over populated are simply a menace to everything they encounter. Part of the problem with the general publics’ perception of wolves is the pathetic rubbish that has been taught to us and our children for decades about how wolves only kill off the sick and old and that unlike humans they never kill for sport. Nothing could be farther from the truth…. Wolves do in fact kill without consuming the animals that they have brought down, although to say it was for sport would be unjustly applying human characteristics to an animal that does not in all likelihood posses them, so I wont go that far, but that fact is that they can and do kill a great number of prey animals without consuming them. Current theory seems to be that this is a skill building or training kind of activity…. But I will leave that for the “experts”. The taking of only the sick and old is also a big pile of hooey…. Wolves predominantly pray on pregnant cows (caribou, dear, moose, etc.) as they are generally slower and more vulnerable than the remainder of the heard, they also prefer young calf’s to mature animals and will take them whenever they are able.

But by far the biggest problem with public perception and wolves is that the dang things are such beautiful and majestic creatures…. Their dog like characteristics and mannerisms remind us of our own faithful canine pets at home, and their stunning appearance and graceful movements leave us in awe and wonderment in regards to these great creatures. That being said…. If they looked like a giant sewer rat or warthog there would likely be little if any public scrutiny or outcry when they were properly managed and their numbers kept in check thru hunting pressure…. So gentle reader… try to get past the beautiful façade and except the animal for what they are. A deadly efficient predator, and you will be just a little bit closer to understanding our viewpoint on wolves and game management.
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