Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 04 September 2009, 09:50   #1
CJS
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Warsash
Make: Honwave T 3.8 ie
Length: 3m +
Engine: Honda 20 HP
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 49
Engine start difficulty

I purchased my Honda 20 HP brand new - just coming up for first service at the end of this month.

The first few times it started practically on first or second pull from cold. The last couple of times it seems to have become more stubborn - from cold - and the last time I spent at least 10 or 15 minutes trying to get it started.

Someone with an all powerful RIB at the launch site took a look for me and managed to get it going.

We checked the plug and it was secure the gap is correct/ fuel is coming through the line/ the lanyard was connected/ it was in neutral/ choke was out/ Oil level is normal and when engine starts the green light comes on - all the natural things to check.

Perhaps it is the way I am pulling the cord.....the chap who sold me the outboard recommended to pull the cord until resistance then release and pull through....whereas the RIB owner gently pulled the cord to resitance then pulled straight through.

I was wondering that once everything is coupled and I have pumped the fuel through the line to engine that maybe I should - without the choke engaged pull through a couple of times first?

Any thoughts?
__________________

__________________
CJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 11:12   #2
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Oakland CA
Length: 3m +
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,653
Manual choke, or auto?

If manual, set it closed (cold start position), pull a couple of times, then open it up again. [You may need to adjust the open position to partially open - experiment and find out what works for you.] My Honda 40 didn't like cold starts, and this was the procedure that caused the least grief (was electric start, though.)

jky
__________________

__________________
jyasaki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 11:39   #3
CJS
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Warsash
Make: Honwave T 3.8 ie
Length: 3m +
Engine: Honda 20 HP
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 49
Hi Jyasaki

Its a manual choke - yes that is what I thought, perhaps it requires a couple of light pre primer pulls first without the choke engaged.

Can one easily add an electric start to a manual engine like mine - what would I require to do this?
__________________
CJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 11:46   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,611
Each engine will have it's own quirky method of starting. My Evenrude 2 Hp needs to run with the choke half out for about 4 or 5 mins otherwise it just dies when you throttle back. Once it has warmed up, it only needs a half hearted pull with no choke to get it going. The merc on the other hand will just sit there and refuse to go if I open the throttle on a cold start - it will start on choke alone at min throttle. Then when it;s warmed up, it's the other way round! (no choke but needs the fast idle)

As Jyaski says, have a play with it and after a bit of frustration you'll find something that will work. It's probably best to start on the "no choke" end of the scale, Otherwise you'll just flood it. If you see fuel in the water when you are experimenting, push the choke in, open the throttle all the way & heave the cord until it coughs. Keep your hand on the throttle 'coz once it's cleared if you're at wide open throttle.....

I do agree wth the "pull gently until resistance is felt" theory. Mostly because if the cord snaps when you are expecting some resistance the resuults at best will be embarrassing!


It's not something obvious like you forgot the deadman / opened the tank vent? (we've all done it.....)
__________________
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 11:50   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: Wildheart
Make: Humber/Delta Seasafe
Length: 5m +
Engine: Merc 60 Clamshell
MMSI: 235068449
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,611
Quote:
Can one easily add an electric start to a manual engine like mine - what would I require to do this?
Usually not too difficult - you'll need a starter motor, battery, choke coil, some extra wiring and something to work them with. Not sure if you're on tiller or remote control, but if you are on tiller you'll need to fgure out a way of mounting the starter & choke switches. Suzuki used to do the DT25/30 with the switch in a recess on the front of the case.
__________________
9D280 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 12:16   #6
CJS
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Warsash
Make: Honwave T 3.8 ie
Length: 3m +
Engine: Honda 20 HP
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 49
"It's not something obvious like you forgot the deadman / opened the tank vent? (we've all done it.....)"

At first I wondered what the hell a "deadman" was LOL - then I googled it and realized you were talking about the Lanyard.

Yes the deadman was on and the tank vent was closed - although I have a confession the second time I started this engine I left the deadman/ lanyard off but fortunately realized when it wasn't starting.

I think you are right it really is just a matter that these outboards start differently due to variations. I suppose I have just got used to the idea of getting into a car, turn the ignition and hey presto.

This is why I went for a new outboard because the thought of being "out there" trying to get the damned thing started wasn't an appealing concept!

BTW Thanks for the tips on the electric start I think I will be looking more closely into this.
__________________
CJS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 12:56   #7
Member
 
m chappelow's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: yorkshire
Boat name: little vicky
Make: avon ex RNLI
Length: 3m +
Engine: tohatsu
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,310
i too recently started having starting problems with a 20 hours use engine, on stopping to fish about 2miles from shore it wouldent start ,, both plugs had a strong spark , gaps ok. but one plug was a bit sooty ,changed to the spare set of plugs and engine started staight away and ran fine , back home on closer inspection of the sooty plug ,the ceramic tip on the electrode could be slid up and down slightly,so it would spark but not in the right place ,,,the replacement plugs even though they are of the same make and number the new ones seem a bit better quality than the ones that came with the new engine ,,,just made me wonder if some factorys put a cheaper lower quality plug in ,,,,,lol,, some of my other outboards never had a plug change in 5 / 6 years and i had no problems ,,
__________________
m chappelow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 13:14   #8
Member
 
Cypman's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Isle of Man
Town: Douglas
Length: no boat
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 337
Is your petrol very old? This can often be a problem, especially with hi-tech modern 4-strokes.
__________________
Cypman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 14:56   #9
Member
 
m chappelow's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: yorkshire
Boat name: little vicky
Make: avon ex RNLI
Length: 3m +
Engine: tohatsu
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cypman View Post
Is your petrol very old? This can often be a problem, especially with hi-tech modern 4-strokes.
yes i agree with that ,even though i fill up with fresh petrol every time, what i have noticed is that if there is any fuel left in the fuel pipe/bulb it will have been there since i last used the engine ,perhaps a few weeks ,and that can cause starting problems with the residue left in the pipe ,,,what i do now is push a plastic golf tee in the end and let it drain out so it gets fresh petrol straight away into the carb if been stood a while ,
__________________
m chappelow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04 September 2009, 15:05   #10
DGR
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Barmouth
Boat name: Blue Marlin
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 7m +
Engine: Yanmar 315/Bravo 2X
MMSI: 235020218
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 827
Does the Golf T method empty the carb bowl?

That's where I had problems with mine - old fuel goes gunky and gets into the jets......
__________________

__________________
DGR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 23:07.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.