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Old 29 September 2013, 13:32   #41
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It's a great idea to wear life jackets. Good modern ones are comfy, light and of course keep you safe. So not everyone has worn them every time in the past. Wear them I the future though, they are a good thing :-)
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Old 29 September 2013, 13:42   #42
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It's a great idea to wear life jackets. Good modern ones are comfy, light and of course keep you safe.
And a great fashion statement for some...
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Old 29 September 2013, 13:53   #43
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can someone point to to other treads on this one (subject)
i can see all your points and accept i may be pig ignorant , but willing to learn etc
i see it like wearing a helmet, safety belt walking down the street in case a car hits me, a fooking good idea but not real
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Old 29 September 2013, 13:54   #44
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What the OP may not know is that MustRib (Andy) has a little experience of going for an accidental swim. Yes that was in rougher water not a harbour. But numerous other RIBs made exactly the same journey as Andy an hour before him and didn't send any of their occupants for a swim. Based on that information Andy should have taken off his lifejacket and said "no need - there is a low risk of going for a swim" - Had he done that I doubt he'd be here to post today...

Pretty sure when he left Milford Haven that afternoon he didn't for one second think he was going to be pressing the "big red button" on his PLB, have a S&R operation involving a ferry, 2 lifeboats and a helicopter and then be pulled from the water by the chopper. However if he'd thought he wasn't going to need his PLB he could have left it in the locker. He wouldn't have been able to grab it as he flipped over the side...

But I guess you are just as bad as the numerous cyclists I pass almost every night when I drive home in the dark who seem not to own lights, high vis or anthing else to stop me accidentally mowign them down...
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:07   #45
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i see it like wearing a helmet, safety belt walking down the street in case a car hits me, a fooking good idea but not real
More like wearing a helmet on a motorbike.
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:13   #46
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More like wearing a helmet on a motorbike.
or a condom!
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:20   #47
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I see the disconnect here, as a 4+ meter, 90 HP is listed as the boat of the one so concerned about wearing the PFD which is a rig of no use whatsoever for my purposes. I would wear one on that rig also, but a much smaller boat with much less HP is a different animal completely, especially when used in calm water.

We had Class 1 jackets on the offshore rigs, but Class 2 on the river boats. Inflatables and class 3 or 4 are used on kayaks. As 90-95 deg F is common much of the year here, all but the inflatables are very hot to wear. We do boat 12 months out of the year. Try throwing a cast net or shooting a shotgun with about any jacket and you will experience problems. Any but the inflatables restrict movement in addition to being hot to wear. That can get you in trouble.

The problem comes in when someone familiar with one set of conditions insists that his is the only way to look at a subject. That is not a reasonable position.

The only problem with the OP is that he did not have enough PFDs of the proper size for all on board. That is a big no-no, but not wearing them under slow, calm conditions is nothing to get concerned about.
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:35   #48
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As 90-95 deg F is common much of the year here, all but the inflatables are very hot to wear.
Presumably cold water shock isn't a big hazard where you boat. It is a major factor in UK waters though, and means that it is a good idea to wear a lifejacket even when the conditions appear to be benign.

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The problem comes in when someone familiar with one set of conditions insists that his is the only way to look at a subject. That is not a reasonable position.
Quote:
The only problem with the OP is that he did not have enough PFDs of the proper size for all on board. That is a big no-no, but not wearing them under slow, calm conditions is nothing to get concerned about.
I refer you to your previous comment!
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:38   #49
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can someone point to to other treads on this one (subject)
i can see all your points and accept i may be pig ignorant , but willing to learn etc
i see it like wearing a helmet, safety belt walking down the street in case a car hits me, a fooking good idea but not real
I wouldn't want to suggest that wearing a lifejacket and having fun on the water are mutually exclusive, and I dont have any expectation that you will take anything you read on here that seriously, but if as you say, your willing to learn , consider taking a PB level 2 course, and why not have a chat with the local RNLI sea safety bod. The course costs money but is well worth it. A chat with the RNLI sea safety guy for your area is free.
It may not seem like it to you - but the advice on here is well intentioned.
Take care and enjoy the boat.
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Old 29 September 2013, 14:42   #50
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I see the disconnect here, as a 4+ meter, 90 HP is listed as the boat of the one so concerned about wearing the PFD which is a rig of no use whatsoever for my purposes. I would wear one on that rig also, but a much smaller boat with much less HP is a different animal completely, especially when used in calm water.
Is there a difference? In the UK almost everyone uses either a Bouyancy Aid or an Inflating Lifejacket. I see pics from the States with big bulky orange things. In the UK those are almost exclusively reserved for donning only in an emergency. US Classes don't mean much to me but I've never found either a bouyancy aid or an inflatable lifejacket obtrusive.

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As 90-95 deg F is common much of the year here, all but the inflatables are very hot to wear. We do boat 12 months out of the year. Try throwing a cast net or shooting a shotgun with about any jacket and you will experience problems.
Its <60F in the air today in most of the UK. Water temp is more like 12-16C at the moment. As a WAFI who dinghy sails, I'd say on average I wear a dry suit 90% of the time I sail even though I very rarely accidentally end up in the water. The other 10% its too hot for a dry suit so I wear a wet suit. Only 1 day this year have I thought I should just have worn shorts and t-shirt...

I don't even want to know why you would think these guys would be shooting a shotgun in a tiny rubber tinghy with 2 kids on board...

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Any but the inflatables restrict movement in addition to being hot to wear. That can get you in trouble.
So wear an inflatable.

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The problem comes in when someone familiar with one set of conditions insists that his is the only way to look at a subject. That is not a reasonable position.
Almost all the posters are UK based, know what UK weather and water conditions are like. We may not know that particular harbour but we are saying we wouldn't change our rule for any water area... inland lake where I sail - 100% PFD use at all times. Canal I'd wear a PFD at all times on deck.
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The only problem with the OP is that he did not have enough PFDs of the proper size for all on board. That is a big no-no, but not wearing them under slow, calm conditions is nothing to get concerned about.
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Originally Posted by 57Aircooled View Post
Or the only problem could be those two kids get knocked over board by something unforeseen happening and the OP has to go pick them up... providing the unforeseen didn't also kock him over or disable the boat.

Quote:
Jazz & Tyler got stuck in the sinking mud before we even got in the boat.
Quote:
It all went wrong as we returned,the tide was coming in really fast and we grounded out,
Quote:
I fell off the launch jetty and then Tyler face planted the mud
Because all that sounds like the OP has a good track record of things going exactly to plan and so we should all take his recommendation about the way things should be done.
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