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Old 11 September 2014, 15:12   #11
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Country: UK - England
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Marine spec brakes are standard issue on boat trailers in the USA, from riveted brake shoes to stainless fastners & galavanised parts throughout.

I'm fed up replacing basic parts every 6-12 months on a frequently sea dipped trailer!!! Don't even mention bearings.
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Old 11 September 2014, 17:08   #12
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I find it odd that in the UK you can't have hydraulic brakes on a trailer, yet you can on a vehicle. Build the brake system with redundancy if you must, but disk is far superior along with hydraulic in so many ways. Why take the braking system back to what we used in the 1920's, that today would be deemed unsafe.

The biggest benefit of the UK system is to have a parking brake, but even still wheel chocks are superior, and work on a hill going backwards.

As to reverse and cutting the brakes loose, our trailers here have a place to put a "coin" or the proper part which fits into the trailer tongue not allowing the brake to mechanically function.

cptsideways, to protect your bearings, have you ever tried giving each wheel a pump of grease right before launching? Gives it a positive pressure instead of a negative as the hot bearings hit the cold water.
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Old 11 September 2014, 17:41   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by treerat View Post
All

we are forever having issues with our dive club trailer. As we don't use it enough the breaks seize and drop the shoes with regular occurrence - and that's after a wash out after each use.
One of the guys has suggested disk breaks may help with this. Not something I've seen before.

Any suggestions on this as an idea please? It's a 4 wheel trailer with a 5.4 viking on top.

Ta

Andy
Do you leave it with the brakes on?? If you do try chocking the wheels instead first as that the cheapest option before going down the disc brake option.

Chris
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Old 13 September 2014, 14:26   #14
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Do you leave it with the brakes on?? If you do try chocking the wheels instead first as that the cheapest option before going down the disc brake option.

Chris
Hi - nope - but they still seem to be able to seize up.

So in short they aren't legal in the UK?

Is that just for sale or can one be built / retro fitted?
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Old 15 September 2014, 06:08   #15
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My Dixon Bate trailer has 2 axles with WAP disc brakes.

Not perfect but much less work than the previous standard drums on the old boat. Seems to be much easier to keep them working properly (mostly for show on the 5.5m - nice to feel them coming on the 7m)

All carbon steel but its easier to keep them flushed.

Also you can remove the discs and callipers without opening the bearings - no rust to drop in. 6 years old and still on same bearings. 2nd set of pads.

Auto reverse mechanism requires frequent strip downs to keep working but its a fairly easy job.
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Old 15 September 2014, 08:29   #16
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I have a reasonable <tow distance to # launches> ratio, and use the fresh water flush thing (sprays "clean" water around inside the hubs). Ihave only once ever had my brakes sieze - when I accidentally left them on one night after I arrived and forgot to drop the handbrake lever after I chocked it.... Granted with the flush I then usually tow for at least 40 mins with plenty of hiills to allow things to warm up & dry off on the overrun....

Friend kept his at a marina dry storage so was in & out the water every weekend with no chance of drying everything off. (but did flush) He took tyhe boat out a couple of times a year by road to go other places. All he did was remove all the brake gubbins when he got back as he reckoned he wasted less time re- installing the clean components before he left twice a year than fighting to un- sieze everything.
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Old 15 September 2014, 09:42   #17
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Some years back we had a trailer that had vacuum operated brakes that worked off the inlet manifold on the engine and had a good sized tank. It basically had a set of bellows that operated the trailer brakes. There was a hand control lever by the flasher stalk and you could use the trailer brake before applying the vehicles brakes, which made it very nice under under braking, far superior to the push me pull you nonsense we normally have to endure.
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Old 15 September 2014, 10:02   #18
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Originally Posted by Rokraider View Post
Some years back we had a trailer that had vacuum operated brakes that worked off the inlet manifold on the engine and had a good sized tank. It basically had a set of bellows that operated the trailer brakes. There was a hand control lever by the flasher stalk and you could use the trailer brake before applying the vehicles brakes, which made it very nice under under braking, far superior to the push me pull you nonsense we normally have to endure.
Back in the mid 90's I was looking to make use of a little known piece of legislation that allowed the LR Disco to tow 5000kg with coupled air brakes. A couple of firms quoted to build the trailer and I actually tried a 3.5T version from a firm somewhere near Southampton. Very very effective, load stopped easily and the trailer was rock solid even under a heavy right foot.

But there were lots of moving parts and all of the manufactures would only warranty the trailer if I didnt dip it, seemed a bit daft to have a trailer and use a crane all the time. Before I made a decision the 97 trailer regs came in and they killed the idea.
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Old 15 September 2014, 12:26   #19
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Are electric brakes common in the UK? They are used on every camping trailer/caravan trailer here in the USA, along with hauling trailers, and livestock trailers. We use a brake controller mounted under the dash which allows the driver to control the braking of the trailer.
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Old 15 September 2014, 12:46   #20
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Are electric brakes common in the UK? They are used on every camping trailer/caravan trailer here in the USA, along with hauling trailers, and livestock trailers. We use a brake controller mounted under the dash which allows the driver to control the braking of the trailer.
Nope, illegal in the Uk.Most of our trailers run on tech from the 50's
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