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Old 11 May 2004, 19:27   #11
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Sorry, this is a bit off topic, but on the Petrol Alpha there's an interuptor switch to briefly kill the engine as forward and reversre are engaged since it doesn't have clutches. How does it work on the diesel version since you don;t have the ign?
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Old 12 May 2004, 02:06   #12
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"We often set nets (bow on) from the foreshore and these require a fine degree of control with the engine generally trimmed up quite high (just below the surface and pulling) running astern so that we can pull the boat and the net away from, the shore"

I think that this guy is a salmon poacher...

Keith Hart
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Old 12 May 2004, 03:09   #13
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As an alternative to an trim / angle indicator this bit of kit works surprisingly well for something that looks cheap (and is only £20), might be more appropriate for an existing boat as opposed to a new build. Des
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Old 12 May 2004, 03:40   #14
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T, think you will find the stern drive a delight to use. One major advantage is that you are likely to have a higher transom in the boat so when going backwards you won't have all that water slopping into the boat as you do with an outboard.

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Old 12 May 2004, 04:30   #15
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Have you got any more details about that Rulan thing?
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Old 12 May 2004, 04:42   #16
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Madmat

www.force4.co.uk sell it(do a search for rudder), just stick it in the middle of your wheel and off it goes. Don't know about its long term performance but so far so good

Des
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Old 12 May 2004, 05:07   #17
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I think Mat was after a trim indicator rather than the rudder angle indicator. One of the things I have noticed with Hydraulic steering is a certain amount of creep during a long passage, probably due to the torque from the prop going one way. The rudder indicator requires steering to always return to the same position (cable steering) so may not work with hydraulics.

The two types of trim indicator I know of are a cable device and sliding gauge or modify the Merc/Mariner "mercury tilt switch" and use wires to a gauge.

Alternatively just trim the boat until its comfortable and feels right.

Pete
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Old 12 May 2004, 05:42   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete7
I think Mat was after a trim indicator rather than the rudder angle indicator. One of the things I have noticed with Hydraulic steering is a certain amount of creep during a long passage, probably due to the torque from the prop going one way. The rudder indicator requires steering to always return to the same position (cable steering) so may not work with hydraulics.

The two types of trim indicator I know of are a cable device and sliding gauge or modify the Merc/Mariner "mercury tilt switch" and use wires to a gauge.

Alternatively just trim the boat until its comfortable and feels right.

Pete
Pete
Yes sorry should have said rudder indicator. I had a trim indicator on a previous boat and didn’t like it, wasn’t accurate enough and you always ended up doing what you said ‘trim until comfortable….’. I find the rudder indicator useful when manoeuvring at slow speeds and so far have not suffered from steering creep but this might be due to having all new steering in 2002, I will keep an eye on it. Des
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Old 12 May 2004, 06:43   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hart
[I][B]
I think that this guy is a salmon poacher...

Keith Hart
That crossed my mind too.
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Old 12 May 2004, 10:00   #20
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I don't mind so much what the trim angle is, more just want to make sure both drives are trimmed about the same amount.
I've actually got a decent fully sealed microswitch which I was thinking about mounting on the drives at some 'max trim' point. Thereby using the trim circuit up to that point and then the trailer circuit beyond for drying out etc. This would at least enable me to ensure both drives are synchronised fully in & at max running trim, to keep them both vaguely aligned. I'm really only concerned about having 1 up a lot further than the other without realising it, thereby hugely straining the steering couplers, or over trimming 1 out and killing a UJ. And boy are the cable indicators expensive, plus my drives don't have the merc standard sensors in them. Other than that, agree with Pete, trim for the conditions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete7
I think Mat was after a trim indicator rather than the rudder angle indicator. One of the things I have noticed with Hydraulic steering is a certain amount of creep during a long passage, probably due to the torque from the prop going one way. The rudder indicator requires steering to always return to the same position (cable steering) so may not work with hydraulics.

The two types of trim indicator I know of are a cable device and sliding gauge or modify the Merc/Mariner "mercury tilt switch" and use wires to a gauge.

Alternatively just trim the boat until its comfortable and feels right.

Pete
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