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Old 01 March 2014, 10:20   #11
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If you are rebuilding or maintaining any outboard simply brush some waterproof marine grease on every bolt (except crankcase) and you will never suffer a seized bolt again. If everyone did this the outboard would last much longer and be easier to maintain when bought second hand. It's a shame the manufacturers don't consider the owners when making them.
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Old 01 March 2014, 10:59   #12
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Got to agree with RIB-Teccie, thats what I used to do when I was working around the country, it saved me a lot of time , I got into the pub sooner and tried differant ales around the U.K.
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Old 01 March 2014, 11:37   #13
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I use the blue BRP marine grease on the engines. I'm sure that there's an off the shelf equivalent, but for the amount you use, it's not worth the hassle of finding one.
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Old 01 March 2014, 13:25   #14
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There is a copper derived grease you can use. It's Rocal anti-seize compound. It's expensive and messy though. I still preferred the marine grease though.
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Old 01 March 2014, 13:32   #15
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Anti-sieze compound that is silverish in color is okay to use, but MOST people put way to much on. You do not need to coat the threads at all, but just an amount about the equivalent of a match head will do an entire plug. Put it near the thread tips, smear it a little and put the plug in. Personally I remove my spark plugs too much to need to do so, but I have a two stroke.

For brake parts Sil-Glyde is all we use, for both lubing the sliders, and on the back of the brake pads. With a two year warranty on all repairs, and long term customers, we find this is the best solution.

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Old 02 March 2014, 01:23   #16
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If your old school engineering ; ) "Graphite " dust or flake is another non grease dry lubricant ,, good for spark plug threads as its electrically conductive unlike normal oil based grease , it stands a load of heat as it doesn't melt & it wont freeze .
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