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Old 25 April 2012, 07:15   #1
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Country: UK - England
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Engine: 1966 9.5HP Sportwin
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1966 Evinrude 9.5HP Sportwin

Hi There

I've recently bought the above engine and a similarly ancient SIB (1977) as a cheap way to get out and about on my local rivers this summer. The engine runs well apparently but there's some rust in the tank i need to get out before I try it myself.

It's the first time I've owned a boat or marine engine and so despite being reasonably handy with 4 stroke mototcycle engines, all this 2 stroke gubbins is new to me. I've taken out a book from my local library on outboard maintenance and one of the things they recommend is running a decarbonising fluid through the engine. However, given how rubber seals can go hard over time I'm wondering if doing this will create more problems then it'll solve. I also think I read on here about a chap who decarbed his engine only to end up with piston slap.

I'd really appreciate any thoughts especially from people who have experience of engines of this age.

Thanks very much!

Adie
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Old 25 April 2012, 19:01   #2
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Problem with old worn a bit engines especially 2 strokes is that its the carbon build up around the piston that sometimes gives it it's compression seal, I have seen loads of people removing the head then scraping off all the carbon off the top of the piston only then to find out it won't start,, i always scrape the centre but never right to the edge .
Also as you said about the rubber pipes after 40 or so years old they may start breaking down and bits start getting into the fuel filters and carb so don't think it's a bad idea to perhaps put some newer stuff on and a new water pump impeller,
Crank shaft seals may have gone hard too as well as the fuel pump diaphragm though petrol may soften up a bit ,
.
Also usually it's the plastic bushes and rollers on the throttle/advance/retard linkages that may have some excessive wear on them that can cause problems better to check the linkage for wear first that start adjusting other stuff,

Not a bad idea to Blob some grease or oil onto the flywheel cam where the shoe on the points runs around otherwise if it's gone dry or rusty the shoe will wear down after a while and close the gap on the points ,
Who knows it may be old but it may have had very little use I bought a couple of 1968 Perkins outboards one had only about 30hours running from new .
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Old 26 April 2012, 04:10   #3
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I had one of those motors about 20 years ago and even then the advice I was given was not to dismantle it under any circumstances.

You may get lucky, but with something like this you are likely to find that you have a rather frustrating start to your boating career. Take paddles!

If you're on a tight budget and will only be going on rivers with speed limits then you could be better to get a smaller more recent motor. You can do plenty with 3-4hp.

Whatever you do, let us know how it goes.
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Old 26 April 2012, 05:47   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adriatic305 View Post
I'd really appreciate any thoughts especially from people who have experience of engines of this age.

Thanks very much!

Adie
Currently fixing a Evinrude 4hp from 1982. All parts available new, except castings.

I get parts, and all the parts diagrams from boats.net, or iboats.com. Both US sites.

Some Sierra repair kits are available on Amazon.com - which is great as they prepay the VAT before shipping - so you don't incur the 10 Royal Mail charge for this.
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Old 26 April 2012, 10:57   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobnob

Currently fixing a Evinrude 4hp from 1982. All parts available new, except castings.

I get parts, and all the parts diagrams from boats.net, or iboats.com. Both US sites.

Some Sierra repair kits are available on Amazon.com - which is great as they prepay the VAT before shipping - so you don't incur the 10 Royal Mail charge for this.
Think biggest problem with that model which was exactly identical to the Johnson or OMC was the plastic water pump housing bursting through salt build up and the odd faulty condenser,,,,,,oh and when people thought that the screw on top undid the top cover only to find then they had ,unscrewed the recoil spring
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Old 26 April 2012, 11:30   #6
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Yeah. Take heed the spring on the top! Most owners of that vintage of omc have found that out the hard way...

Other thing to check is the cam follower roller. They were held on with an O-ring and had a habit of dropping off...

As said, if you start to dismantle, expect the worst and you won't be surprised.
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Old 01 May 2012, 16:21   #7
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Wow, thanks for the responses guys (I'm assuming you're all guys, not that it matters). I really appreciate it and I think given the suggestions, apart from maybe taking the flywheel off to blob some oil on the flywheel cam as suggested, I'm not going to touch it until it stops working.

I know I could have gone for a smaller engine but went for as large as I could on the basis that it would be quieter and more relaxing to have a larger engine running at lower revs, than a small one running flat out.

I found this link written by Nos and kinda wish I'd come across it before I bought by current gear: Buying Used Outboard Guide- World Sea Fishing Forums | Sea Angling and Sea Fishing Online | Fishing Reports

However I have it now so am trying to make the best of it. I love the fact that I have a retro engine, I just hope its not so retro that it doesn't work. It's a lottery but you can be sure I'll take some photo's and post them later in the year.

I will definitely be taking oars and paddles.

Thanks again

Adie
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Old 01 May 2012, 18:39   #8
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Nowt wrong with retro engines... The main down side is that repairs tend to fall at extremes of the scary / price spectrum!
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