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Old 20 October 2010, 06:53   #1
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Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Boat name: Vixen
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Boat Safety Briefing

Anyone got one of these in a written form rather than in skippers heads? I put one together for our boat but did not know if it was to wordy or not good enough; I'll post it below

DIVE BOAT BRIEFING
Prior to the start of each trip, time should be spent delivering a ‘Safety Briefing’ to all travelling on the boat.
The briefing is to be used to explain the safety aspects appertaining to that craft and the equipment carried
onboard. The Dive Marshal/Diver Coxswain should cover each of the following, indicating the location and relative, essential information. The contents of this safety briefing could form the basis of a safety checklist to be used by the Dive Marshal/Diver Coxswain.

SAFETY

• VHF radio and emergency use
Vixen has two VHF sets. The main radio is located on the port side of the console. If the crew have not already sent an automated distress on ch70 and if not already on, turn set on and select channel 16. Using the card above the set, send an emergency message. Remember to release the push to talk button. Listen for the reply.
There is a second VHF set in the grab bag, this is a handheld set, in the grab bag is also a handheld GPS

• First Aid kit

The First aid kit is located inside the console in a yellow plastic peli type case. Vixen has a designated casualty position, this will be demonstrated, if required your equipment will need to be moved in a hurry please bear this in mind.

• Oxygen Kit

The Oxygen kit is packed into a brown plastic cylinder. This is located at the front of the cylinder rack between the two seat pods.

• Flares

A full flare kit is located in the boat box marked “?” on the starboard side. If required select the correct flare and using the welding glove deploy the flare from the lee side of the boat, holding it out over the side. Instructions are printed on the flare for deployment.

• Kill cord

The kill cord should be in place to stop the engine, if the boathandler goes overboard, they will be wearing the killcord a spare is located in “?” this must be used to restart the engine. You must also check that the engine is in neutral or it will also not start. Start the engine and recover the embarrassed Helm.

• Extinguisher(s)

The boat has two fire extinguishers, they are located “?” pull out safety pin and aim at base of fire. They are powder extinguishers and will make a real mess.

• Any additional safety equipment specific to the craft

Anchors: There are two anchors stowed in the anchor locker at the front of the boat, this is a black hatch in the floor. It must be as accessible as is practicable. In the case of engine failure with an on shore wind ensure the anchor is deployed quickly.
Fog Horn: The foghorn is located in boat box marked “?”. If fog descends your only warning becomes sound. Although we have a radar reflector smaller vessels may not have radar. Sound the signal once every two minutes minimum.
EPIRB: Vixen has a registered EPIRB on board. It will automatically activate if it immersed in water out of it’s storage cradle. It can also be manually activated in it’s cradle by lifting the tab on the top all the way up. Once activated it will flash an LED and also flash a strobe light. Do not allow it to float away from you! The signal can take a minimum of 30 minutes to acted upon, so make ready other means of distress signal also.

OPERATION

• Tool kit and spares
There is a small tool kit and set of spares including fuses in boat box marked “?” located on the port side.

• Fuel isolation valve
The fuel isolation valve is inside the console and is coloured “?” and tagged “?”

• Stowage of diving equipment/kit for safe operation
Vixen is a large boat; however, when underway do not use the starboard side to move past the helm unless you are directed to do so. If sitting adjacent to the helm hold onto the grab rail. Do not grab the throttle or the wheel as this is dangerous. Please note, the throttle has a lock, however, do not depend upon it excessive force can damage it or bypass it.
The stowage of your equipment is up to you, clip it on with the webbing straps and please make tidy any goody bags etc. Inform the Helm and crew if you have a camera so they can show you a less risky place to stow it. In the event of rough weather the crew will add a ratchet strap to further secure diving gear.

• Planned route and times
The planned route has been left ashore with “?” it is also written on our passage plan. It will take approximately “X” minutes to dive site with “X” minutes for faff/kitting.

• Expected conditions
We will be diving the “X”/Site at “X” metres, it’s orientation is “X” degrees, slack is, should it start to run head, bag off/do not bag off. If it is a busy site we will use the following surface signal. Upon pick up the helm will direct you to one side or another or split a group down both sides. If a diver drifts off or the pick up is not close enough throwing ropes can be deployed, they float and are white.

Return/Catering
We will/will not be returning to shore for your surface interval, tea/coffee/soup is stowed in the console.

Note: Inform the Coastguard of the trip, including
Information about the number of divers onboard,
dive site(s) being used, expected return time back
at the departure point. Do not forget to inform
the Coastguard upon a safe return to that
departure point.
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Old 22 October 2010, 13:17   #2
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Lifejackets

No mention of lifejackets

And please don't say 'we have our buoyancy devices incorporated in our dive kit'

Regards
KarlT
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Old 22 October 2010, 13:41   #3
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Simon, I don't dive so I don't know if that is a "normal" safety briefing or not but it seems rather long to me. Most of it seems to assume the skipper is no longer there/able to do anything.
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Old 23 October 2010, 07:06   #4
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thorough but too long for the attention span of the average diver, esp if he has been on the boat before, and could get to be an embarresment for the helm to give all that esp if he is not happy with public speaking for want of a better phrase. Also at a busy slipway/harbour/ beach or whatever the helm may be too involved in getting away out of the surf or so as not to create a queue and avoiding others who are trying to push in. Perhaps the dive marshall should be delegated to the task? Handy to have the basic briefing points for the boat on a laminated sheet cos its easy to miss the important points when busy/under pressure.
our points also include nobody out on deck without a lifejacket when underway and only out there in twos, if someone is seasick he must have somebody out there with him in case he falls in or feels like throwing himself in! Location of emergency exits , where the liferaft is and above all save the teddy bear!
Our lot just want to know where the tea / coffee is and where we have hidden our secret stash of cake and bikkies.
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Old 23 October 2010, 23:10   #5
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working on ferries both large and small safety brief was done in a minute or less
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Old 24 October 2010, 13:59   #6
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Country: UK - England
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Boat name: Vixen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karlT View Post
No mention of lifejackets

And please don't say 'we have our buoyancy devices incorporated in our dive kit'

Regards
KarlT
Moot point as a club so far we have not gone down the lifejacket worn out to dive site, more faff for a faff intensive sport, though it needs discussing. Problem being we would have to buy the 275N models with auto inflate not cheap for up to 10 divers - £1600ish? Our helm and navigator both have similar.

I completely agree with the comments regarding length... I based it on some BSAC guidelines. I'll take a hatchet to it and post the results. Under a minute is the target and low on public speaking.

Ya'all check back later.
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Old 25 October 2010, 08:20   #7
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Country: UK - England
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ah for the days of a Fenzy ABLJ. They could all sit there happily with their horse collar lifejacket in place- pah to stab jackets!
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Old 25 October 2010, 09:03   #8
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ah for the days of a Fenzy ABLJ. They could all sit there happily with their horse collar lifejacket in place- pah to stab jackets!
"Stab Jackets".....that is soooooo recreational, we all have 'Wings' now.

(Which is actually an ABLJ sandwiched between the cylinder and the backpack )

This document might help a bit Simon:
http://www.bsac.com/core/core_picker...fety+checklist
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Old 25 October 2010, 10:39   #9
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but ya still can't ditch the tank and keep the lifejacket!
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Old 25 October 2010, 16:01   #10
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If they are all wearing Drybags then surely they have enough buoyancy for transit to dive site( dont want any arguements) but these lifejackets should be the ones which are part of the boats equipment no matter who is onboard and should be for use in emergency when it dont matter if you have a dry bag on and the skipper has instructed you to put it on..therefore is it necessary to pay silly money for them??
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