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Old 28 May 2010, 02:47   #11
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Originally Posted by m chappelow View Post
perhaps the duty of care part is if you forgot to pick them all up after the dive and not to leave anyone behind in the water ,or blend one in the prop.
Interestingly, one thing that was mentioned when talking to PADI was use of prop guard.....my limited experience is that they ruin handling /manouverability, so extreme care it is!
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Old 06 June 2010, 12:50   #12
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The O2 course might not be a bad idea, do you carry O2 already? Most divers when chartering almost expect it now and there is always a seed of doubt planted when skippers say "no you'll need to bring your own" most BSAC clubs who have boats but might also charter may indeed bring their own.

Prop guard question is always a knotty one, the RNLI whose business it is to rescue people often in the water do not fit them, probably for a good reason, chewy might know this.

Carry on dude, proactive is good, hope business grows.
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Old 06 June 2010, 13:05   #13
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The O2 course might not be a bad idea, do you carry O2 already? Most divers when chartering almost expect it now and there is always a seed of doubt planted when skippers say "no you'll need to bring your own" most BSAC clubs who have boats but might also charter may indeed bring their own.

Prop guard question is always a knotty one, the RNLI whose business it is to rescue people often in the water do not fit them, probably for a good reason, chewy might know this.

Carry on dude, proactive is good, hope business grows.
Without sounding like a tw@t its probably because we're trained to a decent standard although accidents do happen.
Another reason could be if your doing surf work you want all the power you can get and a prop guard may hinder this?

o2 administration is covered on the RNLI's first aid course.
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Old 06 June 2010, 16:00   #14
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Cheers Simon....as Chewy say we are O2 admin trained via RNLI.....will still be jumping on a PADI course at some point though.

Agree with Chewys comments re prop guards....was very interested in the Australian investors Safe Prop thread on here....if it does what it says it is a no brainer!

Just had a great day out of Porthgain ....some very happy divers with getting on towards 18m (!!!) vis reported ....we could see them on the reef from the RIB...

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Old 07 June 2010, 09:54   #15
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i don't see how you can have a duty of care for the diver other than getting him safely to the site, you're not dropping him in, he's jumping in himself, it's his choice, the second matey is talking the talk, ask him for an explaination in writing and see what happens
I don't understand that view. A diver is not just jumping in when they feel like it, they are being dropped in. Every dive boat I have ever dived off (commercial and club) has the Coxswain issuing instructions to ALL the divers telling them exactly when to jump. It is the Coxswain's skill that determines exactly when to go. If they ain't happy that the correct conditions are met then the divers don't jump.

I would have said the duty of care is basically from getting them on at port to dropping them off at port again. However that duty of care is different at different times.

Apart from the normal ferrying duty of care (weather conditions etc) There is a duty of care once the diver jumps off the boat until they submerge. Then there is a duty of care to observe the situation until they come up again. (This has to be reasonable as sometimes they can catch you out by moving off the site with tide etc and that is why all Coxswains should insist on the Delayed SMB). Once they come to the surface where expected then there is a duty of care to get them out of the water safely.

If a diver does not then return to the buoy or use a DSMB then the Coxswain has a duty of care to inform the Coastguard of the situation.

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Old 27 February 2011, 16:26   #16
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May I add that possibly its common if only 1 person (skipper) remains on the boat then that person has a duty to log divers in and out of the water?

i.e. ensure that all divers are recovered to the boat.

It sounds so basic but IŽve heard several true cases where a diver or pair of divers have been left at sea by mistake for various reasons. It doesnŽt just happen in the movies!

I think PADI requirements may include a written role call of divers in and divers out.

I only take friends diving on my rib but I have a plastic slate and pencil on a bungy glued to the console with a proforma that includes divers initials, diver time in and time out of water and when my GPS is repaired I will continue to log drop in point and collection point.

Should any diver not return to surface or suffer illness following a dive IŽd like to think IŽd have some very useful information to pass on to the emergency services.

You donŽt have to be a qualified diver / instructor etc to keep a quick note of this basic informatiion. My slate is the size of an ice cream tube lid and I simply wipe it clean each time we start a new day diving.

Best of luck with your case
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