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Old 18 July 2012, 10:08   #11
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Originally Posted by Ribochet View Post
The following link contains some good info

RIB First Aid
I've got one of those first aid kits, and it lives in the kitchen cupboard where it makes an excellent home first aid kit.

It's exactly the sort of first aid kit I wouldn't have on a RIB though, because you end up with the contents all over the place when you most need them!
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Old 18 July 2012, 10:11   #12
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Gaffer tape antiseptic and space blankets - most of the stuff in those little boxes are useless on a boat, especially one that wet and rocking about.
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Old 18 July 2012, 10:18   #13
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forget the space blankets - buy a couple of thermal protection Aids aka TPA - 10 each roughly

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Old 18 July 2012, 10:35   #14
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first aid

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Start with a decent pouch with two or more compartments so you can organise the contents. Knowing what is in your kit, and where to find it, makes a difference when you actually come to use it. If you want an off the shelf kit then I would spend a bit more and get something like one of the Mountain Systems kits which are really well designed.

Think about what you are likely to need. Most cheap kits are full of stuff that probably won't be a lot of use for dealing with day to day first aid. Mostly you're likely to be patching up cuts and grazes of varying sizes, so that's what I would focus on. A separate "patch and go" pack with antiseptic wipes and plasters is handy to avoid digging around too much in the first aid kit for something trivial.

For anything bigger, then first aid dressings (sterile dressing and bandage combined) are great. Have several. At a pinch they can also double up as a regular bandage to immobilise a fracture etc. I like to separate out things like plasters, wipes, dressings etc into ziplock bags to keep them organised and easy to see.

My most carried first aid kit is in an old Lifesystems "Mountain" first aid pouch, although there's not much of the original contents left. This is what's in it:

"patch and go" pack
antiseptic wipes
antiseptic wound wash sparay
Elastoplast spray plaster
various plasters
low adherent dressings
gauze swabs
large first aid dressing
medium first aid dressings
triangular bandage
crepe bandage
micropore tape
Tuf Cut shears
tweezers
ibuprofen
antacid
immodium
steristrips
chapstick
nitrile gloves
disposable CPR face shield
first aid leaflet

I've got a smaller one that lives in the Peli case for the SIB. This is in an Eclipse 200 pouch (bought from a pound shop with out of date contents that I mostly binned)

antiseptic wipes
medium & large plasters
low adherent dressings
gauze swabs
large first aid dressing
medium first aid dressing
micropore tape
small scissors
ibuprofen
chapstick
nitrile gloves
first aid leaflet

Other first aid kit in the Peli case is CPR face shield with one way valve, a large trauma dressing and a space blanket.

I got my last lot of bits and pieces from SP Services who had a good range at decent prices. Their first aid dressings came in tough waterproof wraps which is handy (although looking at their web site I'm not sure if they still do, so might be worth checking).

Anyway, this has turned into enough of a ramble. Hope it helps!
Very helpful, makes me think i've got most things covered. Don't want to do open heart surgery on the rib but want to have enough basics. Whilst duct tape and a plastic bag/cling film can be very useful, and have their place in emergency situations, i'd rather have it in an organised bag/box. Spent 20 years on tankers and offshore and had to do my fair share of patching up. Ships master's medical certificate covered appendix removal under local in those days but fortunately (for everyone) never had to put it into practice although Sti treatment was much in demand on far east runs!
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Old 18 July 2012, 10:39   #15
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What about the dental kit?

http://www.force4.co.uk/307/Force-4-...-Aid-Kit-.html
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Old 18 July 2012, 10:43   #16
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i was trying to find space for a defibrillator, the're nearly affordable! (may not be that crazy, someone i know went out for the day from port solent, had a heart attack and didn't make it back. He was only about 50, makes you wonder.)
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Old 18 July 2012, 10:57   #17
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i was trying to find space for a defibrillator, the're nearly affordable! (may not be that crazy, someone i know went out for the day from port solent, had a heart attack and didn't make it back. He was only about 50, makes you wonder.)
Certainly sounds a good idea, but........

High voltage electricity, seawater all around, and no good if you are alone (unless you are james bond like in Casino Royale!)

But as you say they are certainly lifesavers.
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Old 18 July 2012, 11:01   #18
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A bit of oxygen wouldn't go a miss Oxyfit - Oxygen cans, oxygen therapy, oxygen canisters, oxygen bottles
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Old 18 July 2012, 11:05   #19
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ox

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we must think alike, i've just invested in these:

OXYGEN | eBay
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Old 18 July 2012, 11:06   #20
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I been told no issue using defib in a wet environment , but was told they don't particularly work well on ribs - hence the RNLI don't carry them , was told London boats might have them but for use on land rather at sea.

The waves & movement affect the them analysing the causality proper...

They are life savers , carry one by all means but I think get ashore ASAP to use it is best bet...

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