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-   -   Teleflex Steering connection help (https://www.rib.net/forum/f8/teleflex-steering-connection-help-32365.html)

redxpuser 22 September 2009 20:39

Teleflex Steering connection help
 
Hi everyone,
I am trying to install teleflex steering to a Flatacraft force 3 rib.
I have an elderly Mercury 200 blueband 2o hp outboard that has never had remote steering before. The tiller arm has been removed, but it still leaves a large cast piece stiking out from below the powerhead which i dont seem to be able to find out how to remove.
I have fitted the teleflex cable ' through the tube', but the return section of the steering cable doesn't seem to fit anywhere !
Any suggestions welcomed, as I am a complete novice.
Andy

Downhilldai 22 September 2009 22:05

Can you post a picture of the current set-up?

9D280 23 September 2009 09:12

I don't know exactly which engine you are talking about, but based on a few assorted engines i've rebuilt, the tiller "lump" will probably be integral to the bottom of the engine, and so the best thing is to find / make a blanking plate for it. I have a Suzi 25 (early 90s vintage) and a late 60s / early 70s Johnson 25 both of which have that arrangement.

As for the connection to the link rod, there are two possibilities:
1)have a look in from the front under the cowling. you may find a cast lump with two holes facing forwards. That is where you bolt the other casting that forms the "tiller " and will poke out slighty ahead of the cowl. I haven't checked any microfiches, but I'll guess if it has that arrangement, the same tiller casting was probably used on numerous different engines of the time. You'll need to find or fabricate one to bolt on.
2)There may also be a slotted hole in the middle of the "carrying handle". Back then wire steering was more common, and so there were attatchements that bolted on there to which you attatched the wires. A bit like this: https://www.old-omc.de/e_1970/seite_12.jpg This conveniently shows what you could do in that situation - but bolt an angle to it which you can then bolt the link arm to the horizontal plate.

redxpuser 23 September 2009 12:09

3 Attachment(s)
Thanks for the replies, I have added a couple of pictures to see if they will be any help,
regards, Andy

9D280 24 September 2009 09:11

Yep, it's the "bolt on" version.

https://www.ishopmarine.com/ishop/jsp...=&eCatSupFldr=

Looks like it bolts to the underside of the powerhead, so may be more of a PITA to get at. On the plus side as it appears to be a bit of glorified flat plate, oyou may be able to fabricate something if you can't find a donor engine. At risk of being a pain, can you get the camera up underneath the front of the powerhead?

The tiller lump looks like it's only held on with three screws, however it's a big -ish looking lump so may also hold other things on. If it doesnlt, then should be easy to remove, however you will end up with a gaping hole in the casing!

redxpuser 24 September 2009 21:31

Tiller bracket removal
 
Hi, thanks again for the messages and the link. With this help I think I can remove the offending bracket. Would I be correct in assuming the steering return arm HAS to be mounted to the centre of the engine to operate correctly ?
Eagerly awaiting your reply, will try to get some more pictures.

Downhilldai 24 September 2009 22:33

Yes, it needs to be in the middle, or your link arm (which connects the end of the cable to the motor) would be too short/long and restrict the amount of steering motion you have in one direction.

Incidentally, the link arm shown in your photo has the rose joint missing from the end which connects to the motor. :thumbs:

9D280 25 September 2009 07:53

.....unless you fabricate your own "bespoke" link arm.

redxpuser 25 September 2009 08:52

Mercury 200 steering
 
I have the rose joint, it's just not attatched, as I am not sure how it goes together !!!
Can anyone do me a drawing please ?

bigbadbob 28 September 2009 14:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by redxpuser (Post 317653)
Hi, thanks again for the messages and the link. With this help I think I can remove the offending bracket. Would I be correct in assuming the steering return arm HAS to be mounted to the centre of the engine to operate correctly ?
Eagerly awaiting your reply, will try to get some more pictures.

It may have to be off centre to stop it hitting the engine at full port lock. depends on the shape and length of the link arm.

Nos4r2 28 September 2009 15:14

That engine looks familiar. Has it got an SN postcode engraved on the leg?

redxpuser 28 September 2009 16:42

familiar engine ?
 
Hi, where abouts on the leg should I be looking, and why would it look familiar ?
Regards, Andy

Nos4r2 28 September 2009 16:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by redxpuser (Post 318104)
Hi, where abouts on the leg should I be looking, and why would it look familiar ?
Regards, Andy

Just under the lower cowl, and some of the marks on it makes it look like one I sold 18 months ago.

Downhilldai 28 September 2009 17:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nos4r2 (Post 318107)
Just under the lower cowl, and some of the marks on it makes it look like one I sold 18 months ago.

Was that when you closed down the museum, NoS? :D

redxpuser 28 September 2009 18:30

re mercury 200
 
Hi Nos, can't find any marks on it, but I recently bought it in Bristol, which isn't far away.
Is there something I ought to know - apart from the fact it is very old, and other people seem to find that funny. I do not have lots of money at my disposal, and am just trying to do the best i can with the money I have.
regards, Andy

Downhilldai 28 September 2009 18:48

I think it's great to see these old outboards being put into use. Good on you. :thumbs:

Nos4r2 28 September 2009 21:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by redxpuser (Post 318126)
Hi Nos, can't find any marks on it, but I recently bought it in Bristol, which isn't far away.
Is there something I ought to know - apart from the fact it is very old, and other people seem to find that funny. I do not have lots of money at my disposal, and am just trying to do the best i can with the money I have.
regards, Andy

No-they aren't bad lumps at all. If it's the one I sold it was a cracking motor-started 2nd pull every time.

The only 3 things to watch on them is the ignition,powerhead to leg gasket if it's not been renewed since new and the wiring.
Make sure the whole dizzy is sprayed with ignition sealer to prevent water ingress-they were supposed to be sealed units but now they are old the cream coloured bakelite type casings can crack.
Make sure the wiring isn't crumbling-old Merc wiring does.

If it starts cutting out and the pee stream becomes inconsistent,look for exhaust smoke under the cowl. If you find it,take the powerhead off and check the powerhead/leg gasket. I've changed a couple of them where there was still casting sand left in blind parts of the casing which got damp over the years and the pressure blew out the gasket.

Nos4r2 28 September 2009 21:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by Downhilldai (Post 318114)
Was that when you closed down the museum, NoS? :D

Pretty much-I gave up buying lots of boats when I realised I'd never use more than one enough to justify owning it...

Downhilldai 28 September 2009 22:01

I'm accumulating a bit of a collection myself at the moment :crazy:

9D280 29 September 2009 08:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by redxpuser (Post 318126)
apart from the fact it is very old, and other people seem to find that funny.

My first engine cost 100 - a '72 Vintage Johnson 25 which took about another 100 odd of parts, and is still running 36 years after it left the factory.

The most modern engine I have ever had was a '93 Auto mixing Suz. Why did it stop? Sensors. Every time the thing went to limp home mode, a sensor had packed in. I do believe that on the water, simple is better - less to go wrong, and if it does, you stand half a chance of fixing it. My current lump is an '81 (ish) vintage Merc, which ironically has it's origns back at the time yours was built. How many modern 60 horse engines weigh in at 80 odd KG? :)

Yes, older engines are generally noisier, yes they have less whistles & bells, yes, they drink a bit more fuel & oil themselves up if you sit at idle all day, but they also have a lot of advantages too. :thumbs: big up the museums! :thumbs:


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